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Full text of "MOUND"

19G0 




90 



M( MD 1980 



FAIR-v- vARV 



ON THE COVER: The three 
F's represent "Fairmont's 
Friendly Flavor" — the 
unique spirit that sym- 
bolizes FSC. 



pag e-- CONTENTS 




Flavor - a taste of campus life 



page 

Faces - and the friendly ± O 
people behind them 





Fairmont - the community 
P£t2fC ^ ■ ■■ ■ and the college 



FAIRMONT STATE COLLEGE LIBRARY 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/mound1980fair 




1980 
MOUND 

Volume 70 

Fairmont State College 
Locust Avenue 
Fairmont, W. Va. 26554 

© 1980 by Fairmont State College 



-FAIRMONT STATE COLLEGE LIBRARY 



Fairmont's Flavor 



Come and taste the flavor of 
Fairmont where students are 
individuals, not statistics. 

The day may begin with a 
cold sweat over what papers 
are or are not due that day, 
and a near fatal coronary 
when the test at 10:30 pops 
into mind. The day's end will 
produce a feeling of gratitude 
from all the hard work — that 
learning has expanded and 
discoveries were made. 




FALCON BASKETBALLER Joe Riley 
and teammates proudly hold aloft the 
trophy won during the 1980 WVIAC 
basketball tournaments in Charleston. 

VICKI KERRIGAN adjusts her 
microscope before studying a blood 
sample in microbiology lab. 



LOIS LAUGHLIN pins the 
banner of Sweetheart Ball 
queen on Kelcie Smith who 
chose the correctly colored rose 
during the Sweetheart Ba 
sponsored by Inter-panhellenic 
Council. 

FANS OF THE 1979-80 
basketball team came in a 
sizes and ages as shown by this 
youngster attending a 
tournament game. 




2/Fairmont's Friendly Flavor 



KEVIN WARCO enjoys the bright 
THE SIDEWALK in front of the sunshine during "Stompin" 79," a 
cafeteria is often travelled by bluegrass festival held near 
residents of Pence Hall. Morgantown. 




STUDENTS CONVERSE while 
walking from classes in the. 
Language/Commerce Building. 



I 



i 3 



Fairmont's Friendly Flavor/3 



Then comes the part of 
learning not found in a text- 
book. Budgeting money and 
time, understanding profes- 
sors and meeting all the fas- 
cinating and sometimes 
"unusual" people are little 
extras that college life pro- 
vides — free. 



MARGARET GRASTY walks to 
class on a bright autumn day. 





EVEN A SOGGY DOWNPOUR did 
not deter these Falcon Football 
fans from turning out to cheer for 
their favorite team. 



4/Fairmont's Friendly Flavor 



GREEKS DANCE to the beat at 
February's Sweetheart Ball. 



Fairmont is friendly. 
To those who spend their 
time getting an education 
here, it becomes a large 
part of their lives . . . two 
or four years' worth. 

Fairmont Staters sup- 
port the community with 
rent, entertainment, shop- 
ping. The community in 



turn, uses the campus fa- 
cilities and resources to 
pursue their own inter- 
ests. 

So come on; it is time 
to go "on the hill." Do 
not be afraid of strangers 
because there are none. 
Why? This is Fairmont's 
friendly flavor. 




JAZZ TRUMPETER Maynard A FAVORITE GATHERING 
Ferguson entertained a capacity PLACE is the stone wall outside 
crowd in Wallman Hall. of the Student Center between 

classes. 



6/Fairmont's Friendly Flavor 




DENISE BENNETT enjoys spring 
sunshine while walking to class. 




Fairmont's Friendly Flavor/7 



L 





FLAVOR . 

a taste of campus life 



FALCON JOE RILEY dribbles 
downcourt during a Fairmont- 
Davis and Elkins game. 



PAT STANKWICH ALTERS a suit 
to fit Steve Warren for his role in 
"The Sound of Music." 



A backstage peek 



Twelve individuals inter- 
ested in theater added to six 
weeks of behind-the-scenes 
work equal the Masquers 
Resident Company. 

The company is selected 
each spring by speech and 
drama faculty to serve as 
the backbone of the sum- 
mer theater productions. 

Tasks include lighting, 
set, property and costume 
construction, promotion, 
and box office. 

In addition, Company 
members rehearse nightly 
for roles in one and some- 
times more of the summer 
productions. 



This year's Resident Com- 
pany included Debbie Al- 
lman, Tom Barton, John 
Hofbauer, Steve Jones, 
Vickie Jones, Donna 
McDowell, Barb Oliverio, 
Mark Oreskovich, Mary 
Riley, Brad Six, Pat Stankw- 
ich and Steve Warren. 




JOHN HOFBAUER PAINTS a base 
coat on a flat used in the "Mary, 
Mary" set. 

DEBBIE ALLMAN PREPARES 
tickets prior to the opening of the 
box office. 

STEVE JONES ARRANGES the 
lighting for the set of "Mary, 
Mary." 



10/Summer theater 




BOB MCKELLAWAY (Jack 
Hussey) explains his former rocky 
marriage to his young new fiancee, 
Tiffany Richard (Pat Stankwich). 

Season opener 



The Town and Gown 
players opened their 
twentieth summer season 
with the Jean Kerr Comedy 
"Mary, Mary." 

Originally on Broadway 
in 1961, "Mary, Mary" is the 
age-old story of the ugly 
duckling wife who blos- 
soms after her divorce into 
a stunningly attractive 
woman, giving her husband 
second thoughts about mar- 
rying a younger woman. 

Jennifer Current, who 




DIRK WINSTON (John Retton) 
reprimands Bob for not 
appreciating Mary's intrinsic 
qualities. 

THE MCKELLAWAYS ARE 
reunited and plan a "happy-ever- 
after" future. 



starred in the title role, is an 
FSC graduate and formerly 
taught at Fleming Elemen- 
tary school. She has long 
been associated withthe 
Players and is a popular ac- 
tress in the Morgantown 
and Fairmont area. 

In the role of Bob, Mary's 
husband, Jack Hussey, FSC 
professor, made a return ap- 
pearance with the Players. 
He was first seen in the 1977 
production of "You Can't 
Take It With You." 




MARY MCKELLAWAY (Jennifer 
Current) relates details of her 
"plain-jane" childhood. 



Summer theater/11 



SILENT MURPHY (Brad Six 
shows his muscle to team Manager 
Matty McGowan (Randy Wilson). 




FLORA WIGGINS (Debbie Booth) 
speculates what life would be like 
in the days of "Cleopatterer". 



THE BOYS PROFESS their 
admiration for the popular Jane, l-r: 
Carroll Little, Tom Barton, Bob 
Tinnell, Don Reed, Lindel Gum, 
Gina Ruggerio. 

STUBBY (Tom Stevick) and Bessie 
(Shelly Vilar) plan their married 
life together. 



12/Summer theater 





PROFESSOR WITHERSPOON 
(Steve Jones) joins the pre-game 
festivities by singing a song at the 
dance. 



'Leave it to Jane' 

Rah! Rah! 



A delightful musical com- 
edy, "Leave it to Jane," was 
the second Town and Gown 
production. 

The play centered around 
Jane Witherspoon, daughter 
of Atwater Colleges presi- 
dent and a favorite of the 
men of the school. 

Jane successfully cajoles a 
star football player — who 
happens to be the son of 
rival Bingham College's 
president — into joining the 
Atwater squad allowing 
them to win the Atwa- 



ter/Bingham contest. 

Playing the part of Jane, 
Gina Ruggeiro, FSC theater 
student appeared last sea- 
son in the Masquers' pro- 
duction of "Bus Stop." She 
is a Fairmont native and is 
this year's Homecoming 
queen. 

John Hofbauer played Bil- 
ly Bolton, the star halfback. 
He is also a theater student 
and has been active in Mas- 
quers and Town and Gown 
productions. 



SENATOR HICKS (Steve Warren) 
advises his shy son Bub (Damon 
Riley) to steer clear of College 
vices. 



THE ENTIRE ATWATER College 
crowd cheers victoriously after the 
last minute triumph over bitter 
rival, Bingham College. 




Summer theater/13 



THE VON TRAPP CHILDREN bid 
"So long, farewell" to party guests 
at the Von Trapp Ball. From top: 
Sharene Sindledecker, Bob Burns, 
Mimi Teahan, Eric Tucker, Jeanne 
Phillips. JoAnn Mallamo, Rebecca 
Thompson. 



'The Sound of Music' 

Do, Re, Mi 



"The Sound of Music" 
closed the summer season 
with rave reviews and six 
sold-out performances. 

The Rodgers and Ham- 
merstein musical is based 
on the true story of the Von 
Trapp family and the young 
girl that changes their lives. 

Patty Welch, a Wheeling 
native, played Maria, the girl 



that brought music back 
into the Von Trapp house- 
hold. A favorite with Town 
and Gown audiences, 
Welch debuted in 1976's 
"Ben franklin in Paris." 

In the role of Captain 
Von Trapp, Brent Dugan, lo- 
cal pastor, returned for an- 
other season with the Play- 
ers. 



THE NUNS OF NONNBERG 
ABBEY sing as Maria proceeds to 
the alter on the day of her wedding 
to Captain Von Trapp. 



MAX (John Teahan) and the 
baroness (Tracy Satterfield) extol 
the virtues of love to Captain Von 
Trapp (Brent Dugan). 





14/Summer theater 




ROLF (Steve Jones) and Leisl 
(Sharene Sindledecker) sing to the 
ups and downs of being "Sixteen 
going on Seventeen." 



MARIA GIVES ADVICE to Leisl 
(Cindy Gates) on love and life. 















i 


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MARIA TEACHES the Von Trapp 
children to sing. L-r. Patty Welch, 
Juli Teahan, Christy McVicker, 
Kate Enos, Mike Heffner, Cecelia 
Mallamo, Brad Ford, Cindy Gates. 

MOTHER SUPERIOR (Betty Bea 
Cox) urges Maria to "Climb Every 
Mountain." 



MARIA LEADS the children in 
song to calm them on a stormy 
night. 



Summer theater/15 




ERNEST KARL EXAMINES belts 
for sale in the visitors center at 
Prickett's Fort. The field trip was 
part of the Appalachian class. 

IN THE FORT, Elva and George 
Paugg look at the baskets made, 
there. 



'Sharp, lively people 
who refuse to get old' 



"In your town, people say 
hello," said Dorothy Smith 
of New Philadelphia, Ohio, 
visiting hosteler. 

The "hill" accommodated 
its third Elderhostel during 
summer school June 24-30, 
Aug. 5-11 and 12-18. To 
qualify, retirement and a 
minimum age sixty was re- 
quired. 

Elderhostel is a part of a 
national program that was 
offered in West Virginia at 
Glenville, Fairmont, West 
Liberty, Concord, Shepherd, 
Westt Virginia State, and 
Marshall University. 

Dr. Rober Bauer, associate 
professor of psychology, is 
the regional director for El- 
derhostel. 

Leon Scheinine, who has 
been retired for two years, 
attended Elderhostel for the 
first time. Besides finding 
the program informative, he 



said, "You don't feel you're 
wasting time . . . you keep 
the mind active." 

Classes were non-credit, 
college level and did not 
call for required reading or 
exams. 

Hostelers lived in the 
dorms, ate cafeteria food 
and enjoyed the same privi- 
leges as students. Classes in 
religion, Appalachian stud- 
ies and Middle East affairs 
were some of the courses 
offered. 

Herbert and Rosalie Wil- 
liams of Hallandale, Fla., 
came to Fairmont State's El- 
derhostel for the Appala- 
chian course. A retired 
guidance counselor from 
New York, Herbert now 
manages Rosalie's renewed 
singing profession. The Wil- 
liams enjoyed the planned 
evening activities. "The 
staff went out of their way 



to make us comfortable," 
said Williams. The majority 
of the attendants were from 
out of state. Orginally from 
Ottawa, Canada, Yetta 
Schenine chose West Vir- 
ginia because of the cool 
climate. The Delphi, Md. 
resident retired eight years 
ago from the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. 

Fritz Wolter, West Ches- 
ter Pa., reflected on the at- 
mosphere of the group. 
"They're sharp people who 
refuse to get old. You get to 
meet a good cross section of 
people." Fritz is a retired 
chemist for DuPont. 

Offered at low cost, the 
program was started by em- 
ployees at the University of 
New Hampshire at Durham, 
and now includes 250 col- 
leges in 39 states. 




16/Elderhostel 



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HOSTELER EXCHANGES 
PARTNERS during an evening 
sqaure dance. Planned evening 
activities were part of the agenda 
to keep participants active. 

IN PRICKETT'S FORT visitors 
center, Savannah Hodge studies the 
drawing of a woodland Indian. 

ESTHER KUPPERMAN JOINS in 
on the evening square dance. 




PARTICIPANTS LISTEN to Joanne lecture on Appalachia, one of 
VanHorn, associate professor, several courses offered. 



ROBERT MCCARTER AND Stephen Smigocki, associate 
LESTER CITRON work on professor, 
individual projects in art taught by 



Elderhostel/17 



FRESHMAN STUDENTS leave 
Feaster Center to go to their 
groups. 



Orientation 1979 



Paying fees and playing 
games were all part of 
Freshman Orientation. 

Wide-eyed freshman 
were greeted on Sunday 
Aug. 19, by a crew of coun- 
selors who helped them 
settle into their new sur- 
roundings. 

Throughout the three-day 
affair, frosh were asked to 
participate in a "gong 
show" and other games and 
activities. 

For entertainment, a pic- 
nic and a bluegrass concert 
were held. 



About 80 counselors were 
chosen to head up the 
groups and to act as general 
guides to the ways of col- 
lege life. 

Earlier in the summer, the 
counselors attended a week- 
long workshop at Jackson's 
Mill to learn group skills. 

After orientation, a din- 
ner for the counselors was 
held by President Hardway 
and hosted by Blair Mont- 
gomery and Michael Bel- 
mear, student affairs coun- 
selors and freshman ori- 
entation organizers. 



FRESHMEN MAKE a circular 
pyramid. 




IN MAKING A HUMAN TANK, 
freshman get to know each other 
by working together. 




18/Freshman orientation 




>^_ 



STUDENTS FORM A CHAIN for 
the snake chain relay. 

FRESHMAN COUNSELORS chat 
during the counselors dinner at 
President Hardway's home. 





FROSH DISPLAY SIGNS they had 
to wear in place of beanies. 



Freshman orientation/19 



'The Corn is Green' 

A hit performance 



"The Corn is Green", 
written by Emlyn Williams, 
was presented by the Mas- 
quers on Oct. 4-6. The play 
was directed by B. }. Sher- 
man, and featured Jo Ann 
Lough of the Speech Com- 
munication and Theater 
staff. 

Also performing was 
Christine Fazio, returning 
with the Masquers after 10 
years. 



The setting is a 19th cen- 
tury Welsh coal mining 
town. Miss Moffat, por- 
trayed by Lough, comes to 
the community and tries to 
start a school. 

Moffat finds Morgan 
Evans (Steve Jones) to be an 
intellegent young man. She 
works to give Morgan a 
good education and even- 
tually helps him to win a 
scholarship to college. 



THE MAID, MRS. Watty (Mary 
Riley) talks to Mr. Jones (John 
Retton) about her somewhat 
colorful past. 



BESSIE WATTY (Cathy O'Dell) 
tries to seduce a confused, drunken 
Morgan Evans (Steve Jones). 




DRESSED IN HIS coal mining 
attire, Evans listens to Miss Moffat 
explain why he should enroll in the 
school. 



20/Corn is Green 



AFTER MANY disagreements, Miss 
Moffat and the Squire (Mark 
Oreskovich) work together to send 
Morgan Evans to college. 




-*&*S!tt£tf 




THE POSTMISTRESS AND HER 
FATHER (Debbie Booth and Randy 
Wilson) discuss the possibility of 
Evans' scholarship. 



MR. JONES OFFERS to marry 
Bessie when she announces her 
pregnancy. 



Corn is Green/21 



Cross Country 

Victorious season » 



This year's cross country 
teams had outstanding sea- 
sons. 

The men's team, com- 
posed of nine runners, 
placed third in the West 
Virginia Conference, a dra- 
matic improvement over 
last year's seventh position. 

The team was undefeated 
in dual meets with a record 
of 3-0 and closed the season 
with a 5-1 mark. Rick Dye 
stood out as top individual 
finisher in the conference 
meet and was number one 
runner on the team. 

The entire men's team 
will be returning for next 
year's running season. 

At the present time, Fair- 
mont State has the only 
women's cross country team 



BRIAN HAMRICK, Elston Perry, 
and Rick Dye run for a three-way 
first place tie in the West Virginia 
Tech meet. 



in West Virginia. 

The team of eight women 
completed the season with a 
3-1 record. There is no con- 
ference for the women's 
team. 

Senior Mary Gerrard, a 
three-year letter person, set 
a college record for the 
10,000 meter run. 

Chris Harby, freshman, set 
a record for the 5,000 meter 
run and sophomore Carol- 
ine Toothman, a record for 
the five-mile run. 

Unfortunately, most of 
the women's team will be 
lost at graduation. 



ROBIN BENNETT keeps pace with 
the pack at the beginning of a meet. 



79 MEN'S TEAM: bottom row: 
Brian Hamrick, Bill Weekley, 
Elston Perry, Rich Dye; back row: 
John Snodgrass, Craig St. Pierre, 
Mike Williams, Harry Sanders, 
Tom Burns. 



x§ a 



o 






22/Cross country 





RICK DYE, the team's No. 1 
runner, leads teammate Brian 
Hamrick towards the finish. 

'79 WOMEN'S TEAM: bottom 
row: Chris Harby, Michele McKee, 
Brenda Farley, Donna Jones; back 
row: Caroline Toothman, Mary 
Gerrard, Cora Mick, Robin Bennett. 



Cross country/23 



The Main Event . . . Homecoming '79 



AT THE BEGINNING of the game, 
the team runs onto the field 
through a spirit sign made by the 
cheerleaders. 



The week of Oct. 22-27 
was no ordinary week. It 
was more than just a week 
of tradition, but a week of 
unity in Fairmont. 

MONDAY - Twenty or- 
ganizations sponsored can- 
didates for the title of 
Homecoming Queen. On 
this day, those women sat 
fidgeting in the art gallery 
while waiting to be inter- 
viewed by a panel of five 
judges in the Tower Room. 

The candidates were 
judged on personality, poise 
and accomplishments. Out 
of the 20, five would be 
chosen and named during 
the half-time of the game 
Saturday. The one selecting 
the yellow rose received the 
title. 

At 8:30 p.m., Freddie 
Wyatt, NFL official present- 
ed various team strategies 
and clips of Steeler games 
in the Student Center. 

TUESDAY - A coffee 
house was sponsored by 
Student Government, fea- 
turing Patty Welch, local 
singer, and her husband. 



CANDIDATES JEAN WILLIAMS, 
Gina Ruggerio, and Patricia Moss 
listen to the speaker at the 
candidate luncheon on Oct. 16. 

THE ALPHA XI DELTA float 
travels along Fairmont Avenue. 
Thirteen floats were featured in the 
parade. 




FLANKER MARK WASLO reaches 
for a long pass from the 
quarterback. 



24/Homecoming 






CANDIDATES VICKI HUGHES, 
Susan Keefover, Patricia Moss, and 
Josie Plachta prepare to go onto the 
field for halftime ceremonies. 



GINA RUGGERIO, junior oral Fairmont, reigned as the 1979 A SOLO IS SUNG by a member of 
communications major from Homecoming Queen. "Rare Experience" at the formal 

dance. 



Homecoming/25 



JAY FERGUSON and band perform 
"Thunder Island" at the Friday 
concert. 




26/Homecoming 



THE FRESHMAN CLASS features 
the mascot and Falcon flag in their 
Homecoming float. 

JOHN RETTON, junior speech 
communications major from 
Fairmont, takes a break from 
dancing at the disco. 





ALPHA XI DELTA candidate 
Cathy Figler and escort Roger Earle 
leave the field after the half-time 
ceremony. 



'The Main Event' 



(cont.) 





AFTER BEING NAMED 
Homecoming Queen Gina Ruggerio 



is congratulated by Wadie Blanks, 
Homecoming committee Chairman. 



WEDNESDAY - Student 
government sponsored a 
disco in the Nickel for the 
introduction of the court to 
the student body. The or- 
ganization did not sponsor a 
formal dance due to con- 
struction in the Ball Room. 

THURSDAY - Thursday 
morning began as a bright, 
clear day and the weather 
remained the same through- 
out the afternoon. Around 5 
p.m., one hour before the 
parade, clouds appeared 
and sprinkles of rain threat- 
ened a cancellation. But, the 
64 unit parade prevailed. 

The parade wound 
through downtown Fair- 
mont and ended in the Mid- 
City Parking Lot where a 
thuse was held for the col- 
lege and community. 

FRIDAY - Student gov- 
ernment sponsored a con- 
cert in the Feaster Center. 
For $1 for students and $3 
for non-students, the Fair- 
mont community heard fe- 
male singer Marshall Chap- 
man and male artist Jay Fer- 
guson in concert. A well- 
filled house received the 
artists with a warm wel- 
come. 



MARSHALL CHAPMAN and lead 
guitarist entertain the concert 
crowd. 



1C01 15 



Homecoming/27 



'The Main Event' 



(cont. 



KELLY CARR, Morrow Hall 
candidate, smiles at the parade 

crowd. 



SATURDAY - The win- 
ning football team faced 
Glenville, the Homecoming 
Queen was crowned, and a 
formal dance highlighted 
the day. 

Sunshine brought warmth 
to the fall day over the 
packed Rosier Field Sta- 
dium. The candidates and 
escorts sat together in the 
stands with 50-yardline 
seats. At halftime, the court 
lined up to go onto the field 
while the band played 
"What I Did For Love." 

After the court was on 
the field, five finalists were 
announced. Josie Plachta, 
Student Publications; Gina 
Ruggerio, Home Economics 
Club, Industrial Arts Club 
and Engineering Tech- 
nology Society; Denise 
Smith, sophomore class; 
Kim Summers, Tau Kappa 
Epsilon; and Jo Lynn White, 
senior class finalist stepped 
forward as their names 
were announced. Each 
chose a wrapped rose from 
a box. 

Gina Ruggerio selected 
the yellow rose and was 
crowned by President Wen- 
dell G. Hardway. 

The football team beat 
Glenville 32-7, gaining a 
first place tie with West 
Liberty in the W. Va. Con- 
ference Northern Division. 

The Homecoming festivi- 
ties came to a close that 
evening when the Black 
Student Union sponsored a 
formal dance in Colebank 
Building. The group "Rare 
Experience" entertained the 
crowd of 200. 

Homecoming was over 
for the year, but it was one 
which created more spirit 
and participation through- 
out the college and commu- 
nity than in previous years. 



— ^ — ^— ^— DRUMMER PORTER STILES, 

A COUPLE AT THE DISCO share senior Physical education major, 

. , , beats the rhythm to the "Fight 

in a quiet moment during a slow J b 

, Sons, 
dance. ° 




28/Homecoming 



QUARTERBACK FRANK 
ILACQUA gains a few yards before 
being tackled. 



LOCAL SINGER, Patty Welch, and 
her husband entertain the crowd at 
the Coffee House. 

TO THE TUNE of the "Fight 
Song," the band enters the stadium. 




Homecoming/29 




30/Football 



Football 79 



The 1979 Fighting Falcon 
football team ended its sea- 
son with a 9-1-1 record, the 
best performance the team 
has turned in since it won 
the NAIA National Cham- 
pionship in 1967. Second- 
year head coach Dave 
Ritchie saw his dreams of 
an undefeated season spoil- 
ed only by a last-second 16- 
10 loss to Salem College 
and a 6-6 tie with West Lib- 
erty State in the West Vir- 
ginia Intercollegiate Athlet- 
ic Conference champion- 
ship game. The Falcons set- 
tled for a tie with the Hill- 
toppers for the conference 
title. However, due to FSC's 



better win/loss record, the 
squad was chosen to repre- 
sent the Northern Division 
in the fourth annual Coal 
Bowl game, which it won 
14-13 over Southern Divi- 
sion champion West Vir- 
ginia State. 

Much credit for the al- 
most overnight return to re- 
spectability of the Falcon 
program must be given to 
Ritchie. In the two years 
since he returned to West 
Virginia from Massachu- 
setts, the Falcon mentor has 
turned a mediocre squad 
with a ten-year 54-41-1 
record into a nationally re- 
spected football power, Of 



the 123 teams in the NAIA, 
FSC had the fourth-best 
record in the nation, was 
ranked 9th nationally and 
first defensively. 

Much disatisfaction was 
expressed this year by 
coaches, players and fans 
over the fact that despite 
the final rankings and per- 
formances of teams in the 
Divison, FSC was not in- 
vited to the national NAIA 
playoffs. Especially dis- 
appointed was Coach Ritch- 
ie. "We would have liked to 
see where we are with our 
program right now," said 
Ritchie. "I think they did 
our kids an injustice. Al- 



though we were fourth 
ranked in the country, we 
never got a chance to prove 
that we were the fourth best 
team." 

The most outstanding as- 
pect of the Falcons efforts 
this year came defensively, 
as FSC was the number one 
team in the nation in scor- 
ing defense, allowing the 
opposition only slightly 
over seven points per game. 
The team allowed its oppo- 
nents a per-rush average of 
1.85 yards per carry. Several 
players had outstanding 
seasons. 




FRONT ROW (L-R): Gerry White 
Paul Kuzio, Gary McCutcheon, 
Head coach Dave Ritchie, Larry 
Hill, Bill Haddox, Duane Bias. 
ROW 2; Steve Cutright, Lou Geary, 
Kirk Christian, Jim Ashton, Bob 
Glod, Tim Underwood, Matt Mor- 
ris, Mark Viola, John Collins, Rick 
Coffman, Tim Moats. ROW 3: Lar- 
ry Gebert, Rick Conrad, Doug Ja- 
miel, Ron Moats, Jim Argenti, Ron 
Keith, Gerald Gardner, Don Rosser, 
Ed Greco, Clifford Wright, Kevin 
Radcliffe, Bill Kuroski. ROW 4: Ken 



Long, Chris Humphries, Dave Han- 
nah, Tim Viox, Dave Morgan, Ran- 
dy Jones, Jeff Lester, Randall Best, 
Joe Wirth, Frank Kleman, Luc Tou- 
signant, Mark Waslo, Bob Mas- 
sullo. ROW 5: Steve Stier, Tom 
Richards, Larry Farrel, Jim Mosby, 
Tim Byard, Joe Minarcin, Frank 
Cook, Bob Fulmer, Frank Ilacqua, 
Dave Manzo, Chuck Smith, Lenny 
Marshall, Pierre Lord. ROW 6: Bill 
Watt, Bob Myak, Dan Estes, Gene 
Duffield, Martin Dean, Dale Moran, 
Steve Rinehart, Mike Irvin, Ray 



Holton, Jeff Brooks, Jeff Crane, 
Fritz Loy, Mark Johnson. ROW 7: 
John Godshalk, Phil Chambers, 
Tim Myers, Wayne McKinney, Gor- 
dy Ball, Dale Slack, Dennis Feola, 
Leo Riley, Don Tavares, Dave Fai- 
son, Andrew Morgan, Phil Furman, 
Dub Stansberry. ROW 8: Ray Bon- 
net, Willie Wade, Roger Newsom, 
Andrew Turner, Bill Gallman, An- 
thony Carsone. ROW 9: Tony 
Drown, Mike Michaels, Steve 
Good, Brian Schwanenburger, Dan- 
ny Sprouse, Ray Thompson, Mark 



Wise, Doug Valentine, Tom 
McCluskey, Andy Modzik, Gary 
Farley, Bruce Murgo. ROW 10: Tim 
Ward, Dave Williams, Allen Stout, 
Terry Ice, Mark Kinser, Tim Ravn, 
Steve Berry, Andre Govine, Buddy 
Perry. ROW 11: Mike Rogers, Greg 
Bishop, Creedy Holden, Jim Tal- 
bott, Doug Arcure, Mark Marshall, 
Davey Ritchie, Brad Cameron, An- 
thony Cann. 



FIGHTING FALCONS rally about 
Coach Dave Ritchie in the Feaster 
Center before the Homecoming 
game. 



Football/31 



BRINGING SPIRIT to the game, 
Porter Stiles boasts the Falcon 
banner. 




DEFENSIVE MAN Mark Viola 
prepares to stop a West Virginia 
Wesleyan Bobcat back for a short 
gain. 



JUNIOR LENNY MARSHALL gains 
yardage for the Falcons. 

THE HOMECOMING GAME 
begins with the kickoff by John 
Gidshalk and assistant Jim Mosby. 

ANOTHER GAME ENDS for 
Lenny Marshall as he heads for the 
showers. 




SENIOR JIM ASHTON from 
Brownsville, Pa. watches for the 
snap. 



32/Football 




A GLENVILLE PIONEER finds 
resistance from Mark Wise. 



Football '79 



(cont. 



Tailback Ed Greco, who 
averaged 6.25 yards per car- 
ry, led the team in scoring 
with 44 points. Fullback 
Matt Morris, the team's 
leading ground gainer, rom- 
ped for 701 yards in the 11 
games. 

Flanker Lenny Marshall 
led the conference in punt 
returns with a 14.39 yard 
average. FSC's opponents 
only averaged 2.3 yards per 
return, leading the confer- 
ence in that department. 

Coach Ritchie is greatly 
optimistic about the Falcons 
in the future, with good rea- 
son. Ritchie says he has 
mailed over 7,000 recruiting 
letters so far this year and is 
getting definite responses 



from several outstanding 
players, including a tailback 
from Ft. Myers, Florida, 
who has speed to burn and 
gained 1,200 yards last year. 

"We told our players this 
year that, within two or 
three years, players will be 
fighting to get admitted 
here. In another year or so, 
we'll be able to take our 
pick of the litter, so to 
speak. If we continue along 
the lines we are now, we 
will be a good, winning 
football team forever and 
ever," said Ritchie. 

The way he has backed 
up his words in only two 
years here, who can doubt 
him? 




THE VIEW LOOKS GRIM from 
the sidelines, as shown by the 
expressions of Dale Slack and Jim 
Ashton, 



COACH RITCHIE, appalled by an 
referee's call, waits for the penalty. 



Football/33 



It's more than 
just practice 



A lot of preparation goes 
into a game. Long hours of 
practice and getting into 
condition are examples. But 
what happens on a Satur- 
day morning is most inter- 
esting. 

About 9:30 a.m., most of 
the football team are in the 
Dining Hall eating break- 
fast. Players Rick Coffman 
and Frank Cook say they 
try to eat well-blalanced 
meals as an aid to keep 
healthy. After eating, the 
players go to the Feaster 
Center until time for the 
game to start. While at the 
Feaster Center, they can 
watch a movie or go over 
game plans. Sometimes they 
listen to music from a ster- 



eo hooked up in the locker 
room. Before getting 
dressed, the players tape 
their wrists and ankles to 
protect them from injury. 
Larry Gebert says he does 
not tape because he has 
strong wrists and ankles 
which have not been in- 
jured. After taping, the 
players put on their uni- 
forms for the game. 

"Butterflies" is a common 
occurrence. John Collins, 
Frank Cook, Rick Coffman, 
and Larry Gebert say they 
all have "butterflies" which 
last until the first play of 
the game . . . then the play- 
ers settle down to concen- 
trate on the rest of the 
game. 



HAVING INJURED HIS leg before, FRANK COOK AND Ray Bonnett, 

Mark Waslo puts a bandage on his the oldest member of the team, go 

knee to protect it from further over plans for the game, 
damage. 




A HELMET RECEIVES new 
padding to protect a player's head 
during the game. 



34/Pre-game 




MARK VIOLA RELAXES with the JIM ARGENTI TAPES his wrist to 
p***" morning paper. protect it from injury. 




BILL KUROSKI TAKES a chew of 
tobacco, while John Collins gathers 
up his shoes and helmet for the 
game. 

LOU GEARY REACHES for part of 
his uniform to finish dressing. 



Pre-game/35 



Coal Bowl yes; playoffs no 



An impressive defensive 
performance and an in- 
spired second half offen- 
sively gave the Fighting Fal- 
cons a dramatic come-from- 
behind victory in the 4th 
annual Coal Bowl played 
Nov. 24 in Summersville. 

West Virginia State, the 
Southern Division Champs 
in the WVIAC, recovered 
an FSC fumble on the Fal- 
con 20 in the first quarter 
and three plays later, scored 
on a 20-yard TD pass when 
State QB Don Bolar hit 
teammate Terry Atkinson in 
the end zone. The point-af- 
ter attempt was blocked, 
though, and State led 6-0. 
With less than two minutes 
remaining in the half, Ellis 
Spann intercepted a Luc 
Tousignant pass in the end 
zone and raced 102 yards 
up the sidelines to paydirt. 
This time the kick was 
good, and State went into 
the locker room leading at 
the half, 13-0. 

FSC came out stormin' in 
the second half. Ed Greco 
broke into the State secon- 
dary and raced 27 yards for 
the Falcons' first score. Four 
plays later, Lenny Marshall 
took a State punt on his 



OFFENSIVE GUARD Lou Geary 
rests before going back into the 
game. 

LUC TOUSIGNANT avoids a sack 
by running the ball against W. Va. 
State. 

MATT MORRIS, a fullback from 
Mannington, struggles for more 
yardage in the Coal Bowl with W. 
Va. went on to win the game, 14-13. 



own 45 and waltzed 
through the entire State de- 
fense tp put the Falcons in 
the lead, 14-13. 

For his 143-yard perform- 
ance, Marshall was voted 
the Coal Bowl MVP. 

State was held to just 44 
yards on 39 carries by the 
FSC defense, while An- 
thony Weaver, State's pre- 
mier running back, picked 
up only 26 yards on 23 car- 
ries. The win ended FSC's 
season at 9-1-1. 



FSC 




Opp. 


9 


Edinboro State 





49 


Bluefield 





10 


Salem 


16 


12 


Wesleyan 


3 


14 


Concord 


7 


23 


W. Va. State 


6 


21 


W. Va. Tech 


9 


32 


Glenville 


7 


j 40 


Shepherd 


13 


6 


West Liberty 
Coal Bowl 


6 


14 


W. Va. State 


13 




36/Coal Bowl 



DUANE BIAS, coaching assistant, 
is concerned with the team's 
performance against State. 



FACED BY AN ONCOMING 
OPPONTENT, quarterback Luc 
Tousignant, from Quebec, Canada, 
runs to avoid a tackle. 








LENNY MARSHALL, a split end 
from White Sulpher Springs, 
salutes his teammates with his 
trophy. Marshall was voted 
outstanding offensive player of the 
Coal Bowl. 



Coal Bowl/37 



Volleyball team 
praised by coach 



"This year's team was a 
good group,'' said women's 
volleyball coach Marlyn 
Neptune. "They love to play 
volleyball." 

The team ended the regu- 
lar season with a 5-11 
record and came away with 
sixth place in the WVIAA 
Tournament at Concord 
College, Nov. 9-10. 

The team was hampered 
by lack of movement on the 
floor, said the mentor. Ex- 
perience in playing together 
will hopefully help the 
squad in that respect, she 
said. 

Neptune is looking for a 
better record next year. 
"We have some good fresh- 
men moving up that will 
have this one year of ex- 
perience." The nucleus for a 



good squad has been devel- 
oped in Christine Banvard, 
Vicky Shears, Cathy Stone 
and Linda Cross. "Of 
course, we'll be sad to lose 
our seniors (Sandy Gold- 
smith and Debbie 
McEldowney) with four 
years of experience," said 
Neptune. Goldsmith and 
McEldowney were the team 
captains this year. 

Neptune is also hoping to 
recruit more experienced 
players next year. She is ex- 
pecting to get two freshmen 
from out of state and some 
in-state players who have 
participated in women's 
volleyball in high school. 



VICKY SHEARS AND Christine 
Banvard (21) move to block the 
ball. 





COACH NEPTUNE DISCUSSES 
strategy with the team during a 
break. 



38/Volleyball 




VOLLEYBALL TEAM - Back Row: 
Beth McDermitt, manager, 
Christine Banvard, Cathy Stone, 
Vicky Shears, Adrienne Meikle, 
Coach Marlyn Neptune. Middle 
Row: Karen Canfield, Kay Boyce, 
Sue Johnson, Cathy Mitchell, 
Debbie McEldowney. Bottom Row: 
Karen Riggleman, Sandy 
Goldsmith, Linda Cross. 



KAREN RIGGLEMAN WARMS up 
for a match. 






SCORE BOARD 






Outcome 


Opponent 


Scores 




Lost 


Salem 


16-14, 


15-3 


Lost 


W. Va. Tech 


15-9, 


15-9 


Lost 


U. of Charleston 


15-8, 


15-2 


Lost 


Glenville 


15-2, 


15-10 


Won 


Alderson-Broaddus 


15-8, 


5-15 
15-3 


Lost 


U. of Charleston 


15-1, 


15-5 


Lost 


Salem 


15-2, 


15-2 
15-7 


Won 


Alderson-Broaddus 


15-7, 


15-10 


, Won 


West Liberty 


17-15, 


15-13 


! Lost 


U. of Charleston 


15-2, 


15-8 


i Won 


Glenville 


15-9, 


9-15 
18-16 


Lost 


Concord 


15-6, 


15-8 


Won 


Alderson-Broaddus 


15-3, 


15-2 


Lost 


Glenville 


15-10. 


12-15 
15-5 


Lost 


West Liberty 


15-3, 


15-5 


Lost 


Concord 

WVIAA Tournament 


15-0, 


15-1 


Won 


W.Va. Tech 


15-8, 


15-7 


Lost 


U. of Charleston 


15-7, 


15-6 


Lost 


Shepherd 


15-9, 


15-7 


Lost 


Salem 


15-7, 


15-3 



Volleyball/39 



Masquers present Shakespeare tragedy 



Directed by Ms. JoAnn 
Lough, with Steve Jones in 
the title role, the FSC Mas- 
quers staged William 
Shakespeare's "Hamlet" 
Nov. 15, 16, and 17 in Wall- 
man Hall. 

The ancient masterpiece 
represented a first of a sort 
for FSC. Through a West 
Virginia Arts and Humani- 
ties Council Grant and the 
Town & Gown Players, the 
four-week actor/teacher 
residency of Erik Fred- 
ricksen had been possible. 

As a result, Fredricksen 
was a player in "Hamlet," 
portraying Claudius, King of 
Denmark, and supplying the 
voice of King Hamlet. Fred- 
ricksen also directed and 
choreographed the duel be- 
tween Hamlet and Laertes. 

The play, as interpreted 
by Ms. Lough and the Mas- 
quers, was considered "an 
artistic, as well as an acting, 
success." 



ABOVE: HAMLET (Steve Jones) 
and Laertes (John Retton) duel in 
the climactic final act. 





>•* 


Mi" WL. 


• 






■ ■ ■ . y$0 

■:■■:■;:■:,':■' 




HAMLET (Steve Jones) chastises marrying so soon after his father's 

his mother (Cathy O'Dell) for re- death. 

CLAUDIUS, HAMLET'S UNCLE tries to pray, but is bothered by a 

and stepfather (Erik Fredricksen), troubled conscience. 




40/Hamlet 



HAMLET (Steve Jones) contemplates the end of his life. 



OPHELIA (Gina Ruggerio) explains Hamlet's madness to her father. 






{ 
% - 

*j.-J • 


Ste 


> • 



JOHN HOFBAUER, portraying the gravedigger, digs Ophelia's grave. 



WORDS OF WISDOM are offered 
to Ophelia (Gina Ruggerio) by her 
father (John Hofbauer). 



Hamlet/41 



JOHN FERONTI. leading scorer, 
passes to Scott Morton, despite the 
oncoming pressure from Joe 
Cushing. 



Polo: 

Sixth 
season 



The water polo club managed a 
winning season at 6-4 under the 
direction of Coach Steve Mahaney. 

John McMahon and John Feronti, 
also leading scorer, were returning 
standouts. Feronti averaged nine 
goals per game. 

Mahaney forsees the team 
staying at the club level. "Basically, 
it's a good conditioner for varsity 
swimming . . . and that's what we 
usually use it for." 

The Denison tourney gave the 
club a 3-2 record with wins over 
Denison, University of Miami, 
Bowling Green and two loses to 
Kenyon. 

Also returning were Joe Cushing, 
Mark Karash and Charlie Poluzzi. 

Women's water polo was 
discontinued because it was "too 
rough," said Mahaney. 





s 8^*** , wtr 




SCOTT MORTON toughens up 
against a persistant opponent. 



42/Water Polo 




OPPONENT 


OUTCOME 


Denison Tournament 


Second 


Indiana U. of Pa. 


Lost 


Slippery Rock 


Won 


Millersville, Pa. 


Won 


Indiana U. of Pa. 


Lost 


Alumni 


Lost 



MIKE KRAIZA waits for an open 
teammate. 




RICK MORRIS is surprised by 
another goal. 

COACH STEVE MAHANEY keeps 
time during a practice session. 





RICK MORRIS protects the ball 
from Charlie Savedge, who 
graduated in December. 



Water Polo/43 



New coach, new people 



"Starting Over," starring 
Burt Reynolds, may have ti- 
tled a hit movie for the 
year, but it could also de- 
scribe the women's tennis 
team. 

Given a losing record to 
think about, Barbara Nutter, 
assistant professor of Eng- 
lish, picked up the coaching 
position and began a fer- 
vent hunt for players. "All I 
had to offer them was a 
chance to play in a school 
with a good academic 
record." 

"We had a lot of prob- 
lems with the weather, 
which meant less chances 
to play. We needed the ex- 
perience." 

The season record was 
grim with only one win. 
"Yet, we won several events 
with each match." 



NUMBER ONE PLAYER Shari 
Reed returns the serve. 



' 1 




Coach Nutter capped the 
season as unique. "We were 
all new and we became 
pretty close." Pleased with 
the attitude and turnout, 
she added that a lot of the 
players were seeing college 
action for the first time. 

Fifth player Rhonda Kittle 



debuted this season and 
earned the title of Sports- 
person of the Month, spon- 
sored by THE COLUMNS. 
The freshman general stud- 
ies major reached semi-final 
action in singles and 
doubles in the WVIAA 
tourney with partner Karen 



Hosmeyer. Shari Reed took 
FSC's number one spot with 
Annette Allessio in second 
and Terri Cavallo in third. 

The tourney (WVIAA) 
handed the women an over- 
all seventh spot out of ten 
teams participating. 







'SS4 






.*'.*# 






* 



4 ' 



,**•**<- «** 



1 


7 W^J^B^ 




SHARI REED awaits a signal to MOVING up CLOSE , Terri 
begin the match. Cavallo, third position, volleys an 

awkward shot. 



Opponent 


Outcome 


Shepherd 


Lost 


W.Va. Wesleyan 


Lost 


Frostburg, Md. 


Lost 


W.Va. Wesleyan 


Rained out 


W.Va. State 


Won 


Davis and Elkins 


Lost j 


Marietta, Oh. 


Rained out 


Davis and Elkins 


Lost 


Concord 


Lost 


Frostburg, Md. 


Lost 


U. of Charleston 


Rained out 


West Liberty 


Rained out 


West Liberty 


Lost 


WVIAA Tourney 


Seventh 



44/Women's tennis 




SECOND PLAYER Annette 
Allessio runs to meet an oncoming 
shot. 

A TIRED TERRI CAVALLO returns 
to her original position. 




ASSISTANT PROFESSOR of 
English Barbara Nutter, the new 
coach, heads the women's team. 



FRONT ROW (L-R): Barbara 

Singley, Annette Allessio, Shari 

Reed, Terri Cavallo, Diane 

DeStefano. 

ROW 2: Lila Bassett, Karen 

Hosmeyer, Rhonda Kittle, Renee 

Post, Marianne Romaine, Jo Moore. 



Women's tennis/45 



The 70's: decade of change 



As FSC entered the 1969- 
70 academic year, and the 
decade, the country was go- 
ing through turmoil. The 
Vietnam War was at its hot- 
test, and college campuses 
all over America were 
caught up in a mass of anti- 
war protests and demon- 
strations. 

On Oct. 15, 1969, approxi- 
mately 125 FSC students 
and faculty members 
marched against the war in 
observance of Vietnam Mo- 
ratorium Day. 

Also, during that year, 
ground-breaking ceremonies 
were held for construction 
of Hunt-Haught Hall, a $3 
million science building, 
and privately owned Gar- 
den Lanes Apartment G was 
ready for occupancy. 

The Falcon football team, 
under the direction of Dea- 
con Duvall, went 8-1, in- 
cluding a 62-35 Home- 
coming win over Glenville. 
Joe Retton's cagers had a 25- 
4 season, advancing to the 
WVIAC Tournament. 

Jazz artist Dizzy Gillespie 
and his quintet performed 
at FSC, author George 
Plimpton spoke at Wallman 
Hall, and, in the world of 
fashion, it looked as though 
the mini-skirt was on the 
way out — to be replaced by 
the midi. 

As FSC entered the mid- 
70's, Dr. Wendell G. Hard- 
way became the new presi- 
dent of the college. Renova- 
tions were made on the Ad- 
ministration Building to 
provide additional class- 



room and office facilities. 

Clyde Ware, Hollywood 
writer, director, producer 
and a native of West Vir- 
ginia, was a special speaker 
on the FSC campus in 1973. 
Also during this time, the 
new "block" grading system 
was approved for students 
to be graded on a pass or 
fail basis. 

In 1975, a member of the 
Superbowl Champions, 
Rocky Bleier, running back 
for the Pittsburgh Steelers' 
football team, spoke at the 
annual scholarship banquet 
at FSC. 

Susi Turner was crowned 
1977 Homecoming Queen at 
Rosier Field while the Fal- 
cons won over Glenville, 
43-7. 

In 1978, the tempo of 
everyday living became 
more hectic, thus making 
the outlook for the future 
even more uncertain. 

At FSC, Dave Ritchie 
made his coaching debut as 
the Falcons met Edinboro at 
Rosier Field with a final 
score of 26-26. 

In 1979, FSC's wrestling 
team finished the season 
with a 7-4 record. The team 
then went on to the NAIA 
tournament, held in Wheel- 
ing. 

All in all, the 70's repre- 
sented a little bit of every- 
thing, both for FSC and the 
nation. So with a new dec- 
ade to muddle through, we 
look forward to the 1980 
elections, the result of the 
Iranian crisis, and life as 
usual at FSC. 



FRESHMAN STUDENTS arrive on 
campus to begin school and dorm 
life. 



INSTRUCTORS LEAD the 
graduating class of 1974 into the 



Fine Arts Building. 




46/The Seventies 




TWO COEDS bundle up to keep 
warm during a football game. 



The Seventies/47 



The 70's 



(cont. 



THE WORLD - After the 
time of the angry 60's, it 
was supposed to be a quiet 
time — a pause to reflect, 
regroup, and recover from 
too much of everything. In- 
stead, it turned out to be the 
70's — as testing and turbu- 
lent as any chapter in U.S. 
history. 

It was a time that marked 
the end of the nation's un- 
questioned dominance in 
the world. America left a 
war for the first time, 
weathered the disgrace and 
resignation of a President, 
watched helplessly as 
inflation eroded its dollar 
and the oil situation held 



the world to ransom. 

As the United States dis- 
covered the limits of its 
power, scenes outside 
shifted and flickered like 
disco dancers in strobe 
light; China joined the 
world; the Mideast flared; 
Africa simmered; Iran 
erupted; Cuba adventured. 
Terrorists bombed, hi- 
jacked, kidnapped, and 
murdered. And always 
there were the horrors of 
Indochina, from the Ameri- 
can bombing and evac- 
uation to the desperation of 
the "boat people" and the 
living death of Cambodia. 
In living Bangladesh, in the 



refugee camps of Thailand, 
children starved. 

The nation's mood 
reflected its change of for- 
tunes. Polls found uneasi- 
ness, and Jimmy Carter 
diagnosed it as a national 
malaise. But that was only 
part of the story: while they 
questioned the nation's 
course, most Americans 
were surprisingly content 
with their own lives, and 
the 70's were also a period 
of quiet enjoyment. 

There was a turning in- 
ward of the pleasures of 
self-improvement, jogging, 
"Joy of Sex" and movies 
with heroic, romantic 



themes. Spectacular sports 
prospered to the point 
where even the players 
could hold out for a bigger 
cut of the pie. 

The TV networks were 
overbooked with advertis- 
ing, and block-buster mov- 
ies came back. Even high 
culture enjoyed the com- 
mercial boom. Museums 
mounted lavish special 
shows, and peddled repro- 
ductions; theater and ballet 
flourished; grand opera was 
seen live on national tele- 
casts. Critics carped at the 
self-absorption and vulgari- 
zation of the "Me Decade." 




TWO MALE STUDENTS socialize 
between classes in the Nickel. 



A REGISTERED NURSE takes a 
student's blood pressure for a 
health day in the mid-70's. 

THE FALCON TEAM takes to the 
field after half-time in an evening 
game. The football team changed 
coaches in 1978. 



48/The Seventies 




TWO 1977 FRESHMAN COEDS 
decorate their room in Morrow 
Hall. 




DR. WENDELL HARDWAY 
presents his inaguration speech to 
faculty members in 1973. 



The Seventies/49 



The 70's 



(cont. 



AN FSC student uses the new facilities in the Feaster Center. 



Many groups were plead- 
ing special causes that the 
political system was in dan- 
ger of fragmentation. 
Women charged out of the 
kitchen to demand equal 
rights and responsibilities, 
and gays came out of the 
closet. On balance, blacks 
made solid gains in educa- 
tion, income, and social 
status. 

Rising crime rates, taxes, 
and inflation plagued the 
country, and there hadn't 
been as much scandal since 
Reconstruction Days. From 
Watergate and Wayne 
Hay's Congressional follies 
to Lockheed Aircraft and 
the Soap Box Derby, the 
country's leaders and in- 
stitutions showed up cor- 
rupt, venal and callous. 

The people responded 



with distrust — of big gov- 
ernment, of most in- 
stitutions, of politicians, and 
the very idea that public 
spending can solve prob- 
lems. A tax revolt rose in 
California, and the political 
mood turned cautious and 
conservative. There was 
new favor for pay-as-you- 
go, proficiency tests, govern- 
ment-spending limits, and 
even the death penalty. 

Where will that sort of 
thinking take the country in 
the decade ahead? The best 
that can be done is to try to 
identify the real issues that 
will shape the 80's, from the 
threat of nuclear disaster 
and problem of feeding the 
world to the social changes 
that will follow the new 
technology. 




THREE STUDENTS enjoy a get NEW FURNITURE was added to 
together in the Nickel. the Nickel after its reconstruction 

in 1976. 




50/The Seventies 



FRESHMAN COUNSELORS await 
the arrival of 1978 freshmen 
outside North Hall. 



A MEMBER of the Falcon football 
team relaxes between plays. 





THE FEASTER CENTER nears 1977. The facility was open in the 
completion during the winter of fall of 1978. 



The Seventies/51 



DEBBIE AYERS, No. 34, shoots for 
two in a game against Salem while 
Robin Bennett screens for her. 



New coach; 
better season 



The women's basketball 
team ended the season with 
a 4-15 record under the di- 
rection of first year Coach 
Frances Maloney. 

Falconettes did not have 
a winning season compared 
to most records, but looking 
back at only one win in the 
last three years, the record 
was a successful one. 

"Wins don't mean every- 
thing. We came close a few 
times," said Coach Maloney. 

Lack of talent was not a 
problem on the team; it was 
lack of height. "It's hard to 
play and win against a team 

79-'80 WOMEN'S TEAM: Front 
Row: Angie Falconi, Troi Brown, 
Becky Zirbs, Karen Canfield, Anne 
Marie Fanto, Debbie Ayers, Robin 
Bennett, Joanie Bokanovich. Back 
Row: Dr. Frances Maloney, 



that is taller than our play- 
ers," said Coach Maloney. 

Anne Marie Fanto lead 
the team's scoring with a 
12.7 average, followed by 
Kathy Walker, 7.9; and 
Sandy Davis, 7.5 

Top rebounders for the 
season were Donna Hop- 
kins, 8.2; Walker, 7.5; and 
Davis, 5.9. 

"I liked working with the 
women's team," explained 
Coach Maloney. "They 
were a good group of girls 
to work with and they have 
so much spirit and en- 
thusiasm. 

Caroline Toothman, Kathy Walker, 
Sandy Davis, Donna Hopkins, 
Vicki Sears, Lana Cole, Lisa 
Romano, Genny Raikes, Gill 
Heasley, sports information 
director. 





52/Women's Basketball 




SHOWING HER SKILL of 
jumpshots is Lisa Romano, No. 22. 

A WEST LIBERTY PLAYER 
attempts to keep Genny Raikes, No. 
14, from passing the ball to one of 
her teammates. 




SANDY DAVIS attempts to shoot 
while being guarded by a West 
Liberty player. 

WATCHING AS THEIR 
TEAMMATES play are Becky 
Zirbs, Donna Hopkins, Caroline 
Toothman, Lisa Romano, Kathy 
Walker, and Sandy Davis. 



Women's Basketball/53 



Swimmers maintain high standards 



DAVE CALABRO practices his 
diving form 

ROGER THORPE and Dave Miller 
use mini-gym exercises to build 
muscles, a must for swimmers. 



FRONT ROW - 
Audrey Russell, 
Annie Mitchell, 
captain, Melissa 
Sally Haddox, 
Connie Heaster, 
SECOND ROW - 



Anne Calabrase, 

Ann Pokoraski, 
Diane Simms, 

Woods, captain, 
Dawn Parish, 

Suzette Febllia. 

- Denise Loraine, 
manager, Todd Carey, Mark Etter, 
Karrasch, Jay Thorpe, Dr. David 
Bohnke, assistant coach. THIRD 
ROW - Coach Steve Mahaney, 
|ohn McMahon, Charlie Polizzi, Joe 
Hendershott, Joe Cushing, Scott 
Hernon, Charlie Savage, Ron 
Reiger, Dan Calabro, John Miller, 
Pat Gillhooly, Bill Rossiter, captain. 




54/Swimming 



CONTINUING THEIR 
TRADITION as being one 
of the outstanding teams in 
the nation, men's swimming 
produced four Ail-Ameri- 
cans and a 5-5 record in 
dual meets. Yet for the 
women, 1980 wasn't a mem- 
orable year. Despite a 1-6 
record, Coach Steve Ma- 



haney saw "a great deal of 
promise in the women's 
program and it may break 
through next year." 

Co-captain, Diane Simms 
was the team's standout, 
setting varsity records in 
the 200, 500, 1,000 and 1650 
freestyles, respectively. Sen- 
ior Melissa Woods, of New 




York, served as the other 
co-captain. 

A member of the Penn- 
Ohio conference, the men's 
team finished fourth and 
kept a spot (18th) in the top 
20 in the NAIA for the fifth 
consecutive year. Past rank- 
ings were 9th, 6th, 7th and 



SALLY HADDOX FALLS behind 
her opponent. 



4th. Seven men competed in 
the nationals with Don Mas- 
terson, Jay Thorpe, Mark 
Karrasch and Scott Hernon 
receiving All-American 
awards. The team boasts 27 
Ail-Americans in the past 
five years. 

Mahaney took over as 
president of the NAIA 
Swim Coaches Association 
for the next three years. 



WOMEN'S DUAL MEETS 






Indiana University of Pa. 


30-83 




Slippery Rock, Pa. 


45-73 




Bethany 


46-35 




Frostburg, Md 


42-69 




Duquesne, Pa. 


68-70 




Washington and Jefferson, Pa. 


48-78 




West Virginia University 


42-80 






MARK KARRASCH and Coach 
Mahaney discuss his previous time 
in the last race. 

ANN POKORASKI takes off for 
the 200 Individual medley. 



Swimming/55 



Swimmers 



(Cont. 



Mahaney was also appoint- 
ed assistant coach of the 
U.S. swim team that will 
compete in the World Stu- 
dent Games, held every oth- 
er year. 



Hernon set a new varsity 
record at 1:59.8 in the back 
stroke and heads the Penn- 
Ohio conference. Dave Mill- 
er also set varsity records 
against Clarion in diving. 



Working with the smal- 
lest team yet. Mahaney and 
the men's team set their 
goal for the top ten in the 
NAIA. 

"We're putting all our ef- 



fort toward continuing to 
improve these people as in- 
dividuals as well as swim- 
mers." 




ANN POKORSKI makes her way 
to the finish line in a tight race. 

DAN CALABRO warms up before 
a meet. 

CHARLIE POLIZZI returns to the 
Falcon bench after finishing the 
200. 






y 



I I 

ft? *r* 





56/Swimming 



SHOWING GOOD FORM is 
Melody Roupe, as she completes 
her dive. 



MEN'S DUAL MEETS 




Youngstown State, Oh. 


71-42 


Indiana University of Pa. 


44-69 


West Virginia University 


38-61 


Bethany 


81-31 


Westminister, Pa. 


46-67 


Edinboro, Pa. 


61-52 


Duquesne, Pa. 


63-38 


Slippery Rock, Pa. 


64-48 


Clarion, Pa. 


56-64 


Marshall University 


41-66 






DAVE MILLER, the top diver, takes 
off on a back dive. 

SCOTT HERNON and Bill Rossiter 
receive encouragement from Mark 
Karrasch and Scott Morton. 




Swimming/57 



THE LOWER DECK of the patio 
which now houses the study 
lounge. 




Student Center 
gets new look 



Construction on the Stu- 
dent Center to enclose the 
patio began in Mid-May 
1979. The renovation was 
necessary due to leaking 
that occurred on the patio 
just off the Ballroom, caus- 
ing damage to the entire 
building. 

The Ballroom was remo- 
deled, with the lower por- 
tion of the ceiling support- 
ing mirrors. A special type 
of wallpaper on the east 



wall doubles as a movie 
screen. 

To utilize a central loca- 
tion the kitchen was moved 
from the hallway to the 
storage room with an open- 
ing to both the Coral Room 
and the Ballroom, while the 
new study lounge features 
carpeting and study carrels. 

Cost of the renovation, 
completed in January 1980 
by the Mellon-Stuart Com- 
pany, was $600,000. 




WORKERS LAY BRICK on a warm 
summer day. 



STUDENT BODY PRESIDENT jim 
Scott and FSC President Wendell 
Hardway discuss the renovations 
at the open house held following 
completion of construction. 



FSC STUDENTS TAKE a look at 
the newly-installed mirrored 
ceiling. 



58/Student Center Renovation 



A WORKER ELEVATED by 
scaffolding installs electrical wiring 
in the ceiling. 




DANGER SIGNS BECAME a 
familiar sight on the doors of the 
Student Center. 



AN EXTERIOR VIEW of 
construction as enclosing of the 
patio begins. 





Student Center Renovation/59 



Greeks trade holly for hearts 'n lace 



ROBYN GIRONDO, Ken Schalmo, 
Kathy Boyles, Larry Gebert, Nancy 
Wiseman sit down and relax after 
the coronation. 



A candlelit atmosphere, 
lacy hearts, and cupids 
hanging from the ceiling set 
the mood for the Sweet- 
heart Ball, held Feb. 15 in 
the Ballroom. 

Greek organizations spon- 
sored eight candidates. 
They were Kelcie Smith, Al- 
pha Xi Delta; Robin Woody, 
Delta Zeta; Sylvia Morrel, 
Phi Mu; Lisa Painter, Sigma 
Sigma Sigma; Elaine Del- 
laMea, Sigma Pi; Stephanie 
Phillips, Tau Beta Iota; Nan- 
cy Wiseman, Tau Kappa 
Epsilon; and Terri Sterling, 
Theta Xi. 

Kelcie Smith selected the 
winning rose and reigned as 
queen. 

Freeport, a local band, 
provided a wide variety of 
music for the well-attended 
dance. 

Inter-Panhellenic Council 
sponsored the Sweetheart 
Ball in place of the annual 
Holly Ball, which could not 
be held due to reconstruc- 
tion of the Ballroom. 




CANDIDATES ELAINE 
DELLAMEA and Sylvia Morrel 
await the beginning of coronation. 



KELCIE SMITH, junior home 
economics major from Fairmont, 



smiles at the crowd after being 
named queen. 



60/Sweetheart Ball 



FREEPORT BAND members jam to 
"MacArthur's Park." 





COUPLES DANCE to the sound of 
Freeport after the coronation. 

SYLVIA MORREL, Terri Sterling, 
and Kelcie Smith work on last 
minute preparations before 
coronation. 



Sweetheart Ball/61 



"I never sang 
for my father" 



Wallman Hall underwent 
changes and was transformed 
into a "theater-in-the- 
round" during the Mas- 
quers' production of "I Nev- 
er Sang for my Father." 

The Feb. 21-23 production 
was about a widower, 
played by FSC junior psy- 
chology major John Retton, 
who has an elderly mother 
whom he loves and an 80- 
year-old father, whom he 
has never loved. 

Throughout the play, it 



was still not possible for the 
son to "sing" for his father 
— to understand and to be 
understood, to give the love 
he feels and to know it 
would be accepted. 

"Theater-in-the-round is 
something very unique for 
Wallman Hall because it 
has never been done there 
before," said Daniel Weber, 
director and FSC professor 
of speech communication 
and drama. 




EMOTIONAL CONFLICT between 
a father and son was the theme of 
the play. 



62/1 never sang for my father 



ALICE (Elaine Hellmen) returns for 
her mother's funeral, only to be 
chastised by her father. 




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JOHN RETTON as Gene Garrison 



BILL BROWN as Tom Garrison 




ALWAYS A LOVING SON, Gene 
aids his mother (B.J. Sherman) in 
walking through the garden. 




WHILE LUNCHING AT 
SCHRAFFT'S, the Garrison family 
discusses their recent trip to 
Florida. 



I never sang for my father/63 




COACH JOE RETTON gives last- 
minute details to the team during 
time out. 



64/Basketball 




FRESHMAN GUARD MIKE 
TURNER drives for a layup while 
being fouled. 



Basketball 



The Fairmont State Fight- 
ing Falcon basketball team 
ended the 1979-80 season 
with a sparkling 23-4 
record, the 17th consecutive 
year that the Maroon-and- 
White has passed the 20- 
win plateau, and the ninth 
time in the past ten years 
the team has taken the 
WVIAC title. 

The Falcons opened the 
season with a new look, 
both offensively and defen- 
sively. The addition of two 
junior college transfers and 
a choice recruit from Phila- 
delphia seemed to rejuve- 
nate the die-hard Falcon 
supporters with electrifying, 
dazzling precision basket- 
ball. 



The two transfers — .6-6 
Darryl Corley and 6-8 
Andre Allen — added a new 
look to the team's profile. 
Allen achieved fame as a 
defensive center while play- 
ing for a junior college in 
Baltimore, when he blocked 
23 shots in four games in 
the National Junior College 
Tournament last season. 
Here at FSC, he lived up to 
those billings in addition to 
making vast strides in im- 
proving his offensive per- 
formance. This season he 
averaged 11 points per game 
while finishing second in 
team rebounding. 




FIGHTING FALCONS: FRONT 
ROW: Mike Turner, Curtis Craft, 
Joe Riley, Kevin Beaford, Manny 
Jones, Fred Wright, Mike Stone. 



BACK ROW: Assistant Coach Dave 
Cooper, Leroy Loggins, Mike 
Collins, Andre Allen, Carl Lenoir, 
Chris Harrison, Darryl Corley, 



Bruce O'Neal, Dave Jasper, Danny 
Oliveto, manager; Head Coach Joe 
Retton. 



Basketball/65 



FSC STUDENTS COMPETE in a 
beer-case stacking contest during 
half-time at the Feaster Center. 




FSC 




Opp. 


94 


Mars Hill, N.C. 


52 


94 


Point Park 


75 


60 


W.Va. Wesleyan 


64 


62 


Wheeling College 


64 


99 


West Liberty 


71 


76 


Glenville 


49 


91 


W.Va. State 


77 


101 


Bowie State 


70 


92 


College of Stubenville 


59 


93 


Keene State 


59 


57 


University of Charleston 


48 


92 


Alderson-Broaddus 


71 


52 


W.Va. Tech 


73 


85 


Shepherd 


70 


74 


Concord 


69 i 


55 


Glenville 


44 


65 


Salem 


57 


54 


Davis & Elkins 


57 


79 


Wheeling College 


60 


87 


Bluefield State 


81 


97 


Alderson-Broaddus 


96 


66 


University of Charleston 


59 


98 


Coppin State 


47 


64 


W.Va. Wesleyan 


56 


75 


Salem 


64 


80 


Shepherd 


68 


103 


W.Va. State 


64 


84 


Davis & Elkins 


69 


71 


Wheeling College 


64 


65 


W.Va. State 


49 


82 


LeMoine-Owen 


84 




FRESHMAN CHRIS HARRISON 
of Akron, Ohio, awaits warm-up. 



DURING A GAME at the Feaster 
Center Andre Allen re-enters after 
a short break. 



66/Basketball 




Basketball 



(cont. 



Corley, transferring to 
FSC from Glouchester 
Comm. College in New Jer- 
sey, has proven himself the 
epitome of the power for- 
ward. The burly 240-pound- 
er has bulled his way 
through every defense in 
the state for a 12 point-per- 
game average while proving 
to be a force to be reckoned 
with in the backboards. 



DARYLL CORLEY powers his way 
up for two points. 



Flashy freshman point 
guard Kevin Beaford, after 
being named to the All-City 
team in Philadelphia, has 
found a new home here at 
FSC, where his precision 
passing and ball-handling 
abilities have delighted FSC 
fans, coaches and followers 
while totally frustrating op- 
posing teams. The 5-11 
speedster lead the WVIAC 
in assists this season while 
pouring in 15 points per 
game. 




KEVIN BEAFORD penetrates 
through the Salem defense. 



Basketball/67 



JUNIOR CENTER ANDRE ALLEN 
drives toward the basket. 



The two stalwarts from 
last year's squad again led 
the team this year. Leroy 
"Skinny" Loggins again led 
the team in scoring and 
finished third in the confer- 
ence (22.9 p.p.g.) while also 
leading in rebounds and 
blocked shots. 

Joe Riley finished his FSC 
career with a 13 point-per- 
game average while causing 
those in attendance at Fal- 
con games to gasp in dis- 
belief at his accuracy from 
20 feet away from the bas- 
ket. 

This was the tallest FSC 
team in history. Only one 
starter stood under 6-4, and 




"CAPTAIN CRAZY," Porter Stiles 
of Kingwood, throws miniature 
basketballs to the fans. 



Basketball < 



cont. 



the bench was blessed with 
the likes of 6-9 Carl Lenoir, 
6-8 Mike Collins and 6-9 
Chris Harrison. As a result 
the Falcons out-rebounded 
their opposition 44-33. 

And what is a team with- 
out a coach? Jo Jo Retton, 
FSC mentor since 1964, is 
still the winningest colle- 
giate coach in the country 
with a 435-78 record (.848 
per cent). 

Who can stop the maroon 
and white machine? 

Nobody, that's who. 

FORWARD JOE RILEY of Fort 
Ashby looks for an open man in an 
offensive play. 




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68/Basketball 



JUNIOR FORWARD Daryll Corley 
goes up for a shot against Salem. 




THE CROWD at the Feaster Center cheers the Falcons on to victory 



JOE RILEY leaves the opponent 
down the court on a fast break. 



Basketball/69 



JOE RILEY ATTEMPTS to block a 
shot made by a member of the 
W.Va. State squad. 



Basketball ( CO nto 
WVIAC Tournament 



The FSC basketball squad 
proved to all skeptics that 
their conference champion- 
ship was not a fluke as the 
team easily copped the 
WVIAC tournament, held 
Feb. 26 - Mar. 1. 

The Falcons downed 
Davis and Elkins with no 
trouble in the first game, 84- 
69. In the semi-final round, 
the maroon-and-white raced 
their way past Wheeling 
College, 71-64. 

The championship game 
found FSC dishing it out to 
West Virginia State, 65-49. 

Leroy Loggins led all FSC 



SENIOR LEROY LOGGINS of 
Baltimore, Md. goes up for an 
offensive rebound. 



scorers as the stellar senior 
poured in 65 points, a 21.7 
3-game average. The 6-5 for- 
ward later was named the 
Tournament Most Valuable 
Player. 






MIKE TURNER DRIVES down 
court accompanied by Leroy 
Loggins. 



LEROY LOGGINS GOES up for a 
jump-shot against W.Va. State. 




70/Basketball 




DARRYL CORLEY TRIES to block 
a shot by LeMoyne-Owen. 



NAIA Tournament 



Fairmont State ended the 
1979-80 basketball season 
with a loss to LeMoyne- 
Owen of Tennessee at the 
NAIA national tournament 
in Kansas City, Mo. 

Despite leads by FSC of 
up to 11 points, the game 
evened up near the end and 




went into overtime. With 
five seconds to go and the 
score tied at 82, LeMoyne- 
Owen called time-out. In 
the following play the op- 
ponent scored, winning 
them the game. 

Leroy Loggins led the 
scoring for the Falcons with 
29 points. Darryl Corley 
scored 19 points, while Joe 
Riley and Andre Allen 
brought the team 8 points 
each. 

The game brought the 
season record to 26-5, and 
wrapped up Seniors Leroy 
Loggins' and Joe Riley's col- 
legiate careers at FSC. 



THE FACE OF Andre Allen shows 
a look of worry as L-O scores. 



JUNIOR FORWARD DARRYL 
Corley attempts a rebound. 



BETWEEN QUARTERS OF the 
game, Coach Joe Retton advises the 
team. 



Basketball/71 



Learn by doing: Wood/Math workshop 



Amidst sawdust and 
woodshavings, FSC elemen- 
tary student teachers partic- 
ipated in math workshops 
in November and March. 

The biennial workshop is 
held at FSC and surround- 
ing colleges in cooperation 
with the W. Va. Department 
of Education. 



It is designed to empha- 
size participant construc- 
tion of inexpensive math- 
ematics manipulative aids 
with the use of hand and 
power tools, and involves 
applying the manipulative 
aids to mathematical activi- 
ties. 

"By using the Wood 'n 



Math method, student 
teachers learn skills in the 
construction and use of 
mathematical aids," said Dr. 
Glennis Cunningham, coor- 
dinator of elementary edu- 
cation. 

The aids are adapted to 
the metric system, the an- 
ticipated mathematical pro- 



cess of the future. "In this 
way children grow up with 
a broader knowledge of 
mathematical skills," said 
Cunningham. 

Some of the manipulative 
aids include a balance, an 
abacus, number puzzles, 
and geoboards. 




USING A JIGSAW, Vicky Utt saws 
wood to make a caliper to be used 
in measuring. 



JENNY WHITE and JOYCE 
DEHNER put finishing touches on 
wooden parts before assembling 
calipers. 




72/Wood 'n Math Workshop 



USING THE METRIC SYSTEM, SUSAN ELMER wields a handsaw 
Denise Spradling adds numbers to to cut wood blocks to be used in 
her caliper. number puzzles. 




BARBARA MANCINA carefully 
constructs a depth gauge. 



Wood 'n Math Workshop/73 



SENIOR DIANNE ADRIAN 
donates her singing talent to 
entertain the rockers and 
spectators. 



CSU Rock-a-thon 



A successful 24-hour 
Rock-a-thon, sponsored by 
Christian Student Union, 
was held March 7-8 in FSC 
ballroom to raise money for 
student summer mis- 
sionaries. 

Musical entertainment 
played a big part in the suc- 
cess of the Rock-a-thon. 
Dianne Adrian, FSC senior, 
sang in the first few hours 
of the event. 

"His Song," a group origi- 
nally from Tulsa, Okla., en- 
tertained not only the rock- 
ers but several spectators. 
The group, consisting of Mr. 
& Mrs. Dave Craton and Mr. 
& Mrs. R.J. Roberts, is a to- 



tal faith ministry group. 

To help wrap up the last 
few hours were the "Young 
Disciples" from Huntington. 

The rockers also provided 
their own entertainment by 
playing different games and 
inventing sports, such as 
"rocking badminton." 

FSC Christian Student 
Union is part of a nation- 
wide organization entitled 
Baptist Student Union. 

The groups on different 
campuses in W.Va. set a 
goal to raise money to send 
one or two students as mis- 
sionaries for a ten-week 
period during the summer. 





PHIL MORRIS RELAXES for a 
moment and enjoys the musical 
entertainment. 



KATHY SMITH, Kevin Kisner, 
Cheryl Carr, and Mary Jane 
Wilmoth help each other to stay 
awake. 



74/Rock-a-thon 



MIRROR CEILING SHOT of Kevin Jane Wilmoth, Phil Morris, Bill 
GEORGE DRENNEN blows his Kisher, Greg Lynch, Rustie Sherves, Jones, Bill Ellifritt, and Cheryl 
whistle to kick off the event. Roger Morgan, Kathy Smith, Mary Carr, in center. 




CENTER KEVIN KISNER and 
Carroll Little seem to be enjoying 
themselves while Kathy Smith 
reaches a little too far and falls 
from her rocker. 

Rock-a-thon/75 



VICKI COLLINS, SHELLY LOWE 
and Lisa Strother relax near the 
hotel pool. 



RELAXING BENEATH PALM 
TREES are Mark Robinson and 
Mike Belmear. 




SPOTTED ON A CRUISE were SETTLING IN for the plane trip 
these oil storage tanks used to store are Kelly Spradling and a friend 
oil from world wide wells. from WVU. 



76/Bahamas trip 



'It's better in the Bahamas' 



"It's better in the Ba- 
hamas." 

Fourteen FSC students 
who spent their spring 
break on the sunny Baha- 
mian island of Freeport 
would agree to that state- 
ment. 

"I think it was a great ex- 
perience," said Jim Scott, 



one of the group. 

Scott said the students 
found the island natives 
friendly and the atmosphere 
relaxing. 

Highlights of the tour in- 
cluded a snorkeling cruise, 
a private beach party, and a 
visit to Jacques Cousteau's 
Underwater Museum. 



Freeport, an island south 
of Nassau, is one of the Ba- 
hamas' fastest developing 
tourist areas. 

The student government 
— sponsored trip, arranged 
through a travel agency spe- 
cializing in group tours, 
ranged in cost from $300 to 
$400 per person depending 



on the number per room. 

Those missing out on this 
year's trip should start sav- 
ing pennies, as next spring 
break's planned trip is to 
Mexico and the city of Aca- 
paulco. 




Bahamas trip/77 



Hard working 
cheerleaders 



In April 1979, around 30 
students tried out to be on 
the cheerleading squad for 
the coming year. 

The previous cheerlead- 
ers taught them various 
cheers, stunts, jumps and 
the school song. 

These activities were all 
judged when they tried out 
along with their appear- 
ance, personality, voice, 
movements, enthusiasm and 
posture. 

This year's squad con- 
sisted of six women and 
three men. 

During the summer, the 
cheerleaders met at various 
times to practice. They 



practiced for almost a week 
together before going to 
cheerleading camp at Knox- 
ville, Tenn., in August. 

Practicing was important 
to the nine members of the 
squad. Practice time was set 
every Tuesday and 
Thursday from 12:30-1:30. 
One or two nights a week 
was added practice time 
when the cheerleaders were 
going to do a dance routine 
at a game or when they 
were getting ready for the 
tournaments. 

This practice paid off, for 
the squad won second place 
in the WVIAC tournaments 
at Charleston. 



AFTER HAVING BROKEN her 
ankle at the beginning of football 
season, Donna Knotts cheers at her 
first home game. 



WORKING TOGETHER was 
important for looking good and for 
safety reasons when the 
cheerleaders were doing pyramids 
and stunts. 




TAMMY TENNETT shows her 
dedication to cheerleading by 
cheering in the rain at a football 
game. 









TAMMY TENNETT, Kristi 
Williams and Anna Talerico do a 
cheer together at a home football 
game. 




78/Cheerleaders 



1970-80 CHEERLEADERS - 
FRONT ROW: Anna Talerico, 
Laura Downey, Tammy Tennett, 
head cheerleader; Donna Knotts, 
Kristi Williams, Michele Morris; 
BACK ROW: Tim Belotte, Porter 
Stiles, Emil Lehosit. 

LAURA DOWNEY throws out 
miniature basketballs at a home 
game to help boost school spirit. 




TAKING TIME OUT from 
cheering, Michele Morris watches a 
play at a football game. 



Cheerleaders/79 



• 



Mad man saves 
convicted witch 



"The Lady's Not For 
Burning," a Masquers' pro- 
duction, was presented in 
Wallman Hall on March 27- 
29. 

The contemporary drama, 
written by Christopher Fry, 
is a romantic-comedy that 
takes place in a small mar- 
ket town during the late 
Middle Ages. 

Director of the play was 
Charles H. Swanson, associ- 
ate professor of speech and 
drama. 

Jennet, a witch, was 
played by freshman speech 
communication major 
Becky Nichols. Thomas, a 
discharged soldier, was 
played by John Retton, jun- 
ior psychology major. Rich- 
ard, an orphaned clerk, was 



played by freshman English 
major Cliff Issacs and Ali- 
zon was played by Shelly 
Vilar, freshman speech 
communications and theater 
major. 

Others featured in the 
play were Tim Pirlo as 
Nicholas, Fran Perry as 
Margaret, Pat Hill as Hum- 
phrey, John Fallon as Ty- 
son, Randy Wilson as Tap- 
percoom, Bill Caldwell as 
the Chaplain and Greg Ma- 
son as Skipps. 

Assistant directors were 
Jennifer Little and Lee 
Gable, freshman speech and 
theater majors. The set was 
done by John Hofbauer, 
junior speech and theater 
major. 



JUDGE TAPPERCOOM (Randy MARGARET (FRAN PERRY) talks 

Wilson) gives his advice to the to Jennet (Becky Nichols) about 

mayor (John Fallon) as whether or why she came to see the mayor, 

not to have Jennet burned at the while Thomas (John Retton) 

stake. eavesdrops. 





THOMAS TRIES to cheer up 
Jennet when she thinks she is to be 
burned at the stake. 



80/"The Lady's Not For Burning" 



THOMAS COMES to the mayor 
expressing his wishes to be hung. 

THE CHAPLAIN (Bill Caldwell) 
hugs his prize possession, his 
violin. 




NICHOLAS (TIM PIRLO) tells 
Alizon (Shelly Vilar) she is to 
marry him instead of his brother 
Humphrey while Richard (Cliff 
Issacs) listens. 



HUMPHREY (PAT HILL) listens as 
his mother tells him the plans for 
his wedding. 



'The Lady's Not For Burning"/81 



Entertainment: 

Boogie to your own beat 



What do FSC students do 
for entertainment after 
hours? Excluding sports, 
fraternities, and all on- 
campus activities, they still 
find things to do. 

Music plays a great part 
of evening entertainment. 
Students listen to music 
ranging from Disco to Jazz, 
and from Bluegrass to Rock- 
n-Roll. 

Local estbalishments 
flourish from FSC patron- 
age, as students dance and 
drink themselves into the 
night. 

College students also 
flock to local movie the- 
aters. This past year, they 
saw Bette Midler belt out 
rock-n-roll, Dustin Hoffman 



become a mother, and Steve 
Martin remain "The Jerk". 

Besides going out on the 
town, most students consid- 
er parties with friends the 
most rewarding and cheap- 
est form of entertainment. 

So whether they are at a 
bar, a disco, a party, or at 
the movies, it goes to show 
that FSC students certainly 
have one heck of a night 
life. 



A SALESPERSON tries a hat on 
for size. Shopping proves to be a 
popular night pastime. 

LARY ARNETT, Diane Hanna, 
Mark Waslo, Kiin Brown, Carol 
Michael, Mike Sauro and Tammy 
Goehringer celebrate the weekend 
at a local pub. 





82/Student night life 



WIDE VARIETIES of music, and 
BILL KLINGLESMITH finds rock movies like "The Rose" are popular 
music in good taste. among students. 




FRAN PERRY, Bill Caldwell, and 
John Retton, from the cast of "The 
Lady's Not for Burning", relax at a 
party. 

LOCAL DANCE establishments 
provide students with night 
entertainment. 



Student night life/83 



'We are family' 



Approximately 3,000 
people packed the Feaster 
Center Sunday, April 13, to 
boogie to the rhythm and 
blues sound of Sister 
Sledge. 

Sponsored by Student 
Government, the four 
Sledge sisters from Phila- 
delphia entertained the 
crowd with songs from 
their two platinum albums. 

Highlighting the evening 
was their big disco hit, "We 
Are Family," adopted by 
the World Champion Pitts- 
burgh Pirates as their theme 
song. 

Ramsey Lewis, a top 
name in jazz and pop, 
opened the show as special 
guest artist. 

Concert preparations be- 
gan in December, 1979, ac- 
cording to Michael Belmear, 
Student Affairs Counselor 
and Student Government 
adviser. 

Taken from the pro- 
gramming account funded 
by the Student Activity fee 
and controlled by Student 
Government was appro- 
ximately $20,000 to cover 
the costs of the concert. 

In an estimated break- 
down of the figure, $16,000 



was paid to the performers: 
Lewis received $3,500, and 
Sister Sledge, $12,500. Three 
thousand dollars went to 
the rental of sound and 
light equipment and $1,000 
went for miscellaneous 
items such as food, dry ice 
and overtime for the work- 
ers. 

Ticket sales for students 
and non-students totaled 
approximately $9,000. Tick- 
ets went on sale for stu- 
dents one week and a half 
before they were available 
to the public. 

Actual setting up of 
equipment began Saturday 
before the concert. John 
Hofbauer, FSC student and 
stage manager for the con- 
cert, was instrumental in 
building the stage. 

On Sunday, the sound 
and light equipment was set 
up by 4:30. Twelve students 
were hired to assist the 
group's eight road crew 
who worked until 2 a.m. to 
tear down when the concert 
was over. 

"It was the best concert 
we've ever had," stated Bel- 
mear, "and I appreciate the 
conduct of the audience 
and the help I got." 




RAMSEY LEWIS, the opening act, 
thanks the crowd at the end of his 
act. 




84/Sister Sledge 



TWO MEMBERS of Sister Sledge 
perform for the approximate 3,000 
at the Feaster Center. 



PERFORMING HIS FAMOUS jazz 
sound, Ramsey Lewis mellows the 
mood. 





THE SISTERS BOOGIE to the beat 
of "He's the Greatest Dancer." 

A LIGHT SHOW and fog machine 
added to the visual aspect of the 
concert. 




THE MOOD CHANGES as Sister 
Sledge takes the stage. 

BEING VERSATILE 
PERFORMERS, one of the 
members slows down the tempo. 



Sister Sledge/85 



Miss FSC 1981 



KELLY CARR is congratulated by 
Patricia Dodrill after being named 



Miss Fairmont State. 



Kelly Can, representing 
Sigma Pi Fraternity, was 
crowned Miss Fairmont 
State College 1981 during 
the annual pageant held 
April 21 in Wallman Hall. 

Miss Carr, a sophomore 
retail management major 
from Petersburg, WV, was 
chosen from a field of 15 
contestants by a panel of 
five judges. Other finalists 
included Patricia Dodrill, 
Miss Theta Xi, first runner- 
up; Shelli Summers, Miss 
Future Secretary, second 
runner-up; and Stacy Vick- 
ers, Miss Sigma Sigma Sig- 
ma, third runner-up. 

The contestants, repre- 



senting Greek organizations, 
dormitories, and various 
campus organizations were 
judged in a personality in- 
terview prior to the pag- 
eant. During the pageant, 
contestants were judged in 
sports wear, swimsuits, and 
evening gowns. 

The five judges consisted 
of Emma Laughlin, Frank 
Lee, Cheryl Ryemer, and 
James and Betty Smith. 

Mari Mitchell, Miss FSC 
1980, crowned Miss Carr. 
James Scott, student body 
president, served as master- 
of-ceremonies. Women's 
Panhellenic Council spon- 
sored the pageant. 




DURING THE FINALISTS' 
INTERVIEW, James Scott, student 
body president, interviews Kelly 
Carr. 




DURING THE SWIMSUIT 
COMPETITION, Romona Held, 
Miss Tau Beta Iota, pauses before 
leaving the stage. 



MISS FRESHMAN CLASS Terri 
Green models her streetwear 
clothing. 



86/Miss FSC 



A SMILE OF ELATION expresses 
Kelly Carr's feelings after being 
crowned Miss FSC. 

THIRD RUNNER-UP Stacy Vickers 
appears in the evening gown 
portion of the pageant. 





SHELLI SUMMERS, Miss Future 
Secretary, poses for the judges and 
audience during the evening gown 
competition. 

THE FOUR FINALISTS, Patricia 
Dodrill, Kelly Carr, Stacy Vickers, 
and Shelli Summers, await the 
judges' decision. 



Miss FSC/87 



Student 
leaders 
change 

program 



JAYNE LYBRAND, body language 
expert, demonstrates the wrong 
way to sit during a job interview. 



DONATING BLOOD for blood 
donor day is Greg Tinnell, 
representative-at-large. 

If anything was different 
about student government 
in 1980, it was student in- 
volvement. 

The 1980 election turnout 
was approximately 700 stu- 
dents; three to four hundred 
more voted than ever be- 
fore. 

In order to make student 
government more of a gov- 
erning body, the programm- 
ing committee was added as 
a branch to student govern- 
ment. The chairman and 
committee would take care 
of all programming, helping 
the government to get away 
from the social aspect and 
into the governing light. 

Brent Beveridge, attorney 
at law and FSC graduate, 
was hired by student gov- 
ernment as a service. 

Programming for the '79- 
80 year was headed by the 
government. Cultural 
events, spring concert, guest 
lecturers were part of the 
lineup. 










88/Student Government 



A SAXOPHONE SOLO is 
performed fay a member of 
Ferguson's band. The band 
presented a concert in the fall 
semester. 



JAZZ ARTIST Maynard Ferguson 
prepares to hit a high note in his 
famous version of "Rocky II." 




Jim Scott serves on board 



Student body president 
Jim Scott represented the 
students of West Virginia 
on the Board of Regents this 
year. 

Chairing the adviser 
council (made up of repre- 
sentatives from all state in- 
stitutions), Scott was to car- 
ry on a line of commu- 
nication between the Board 
of Regents and the council. 
The job of the council, ac- 
cording to Scott, is to "bring 
up the concerns of students 
and look at them as a whole 
not as just one institution." 



Some of the concerns re- 
viewed by the board this 
year concerned academic 
advising, fee increases and 
loans. 

Recommendations for ad- 
visers included training and 
posted hours. Orientation 
for freshmen was also a 
consideration. The Higher 
Education Resource Fee 
(HERF) and House Bill 1029 
were also reviewed. 

"In the area of students' 
needs, it came to their at- 
tention that not enough 
loans were available 



through commercial banks," 
said Scott. A private co- 
operation lender was 
brought in for students. "If 
a student is turned down, 
then he or she can come to 
them for a loan," Scott said. 

Under fee changes, the 
application for a change 
now has a blank for the sig- 
nature of the student body 
president so he or she will 
be aware of the increases. 

"People think Fairmont 
State was slighted," said 
Scott. But due to his ap- 
pointment, he feels that 



people are more aware of 
what is going on with the 
college. 

The purpose of student 
government to Scott, 
"should be more research- 
oriented. I think we should 
be more concerned with the 
issues in Charleston and be- 
come aware of what is go- 
ing on in the state and na- 
tion." 



Student Government/89 



ROCK ARTIST jay Ferguson is the 
featured act during the 
Homecoming concert. 

VICE PRESIDENT Kathy Beale 
awaits the beginning of the half- 
time Homecoming festivities. 

TWO COEDS lounge by a pool in 
the Bahamas. A student trip was 
available during spring break. 



Student Government 



(cont.) 




* ' ■ 





Appalachian 

dance 

and music 

ensemble 

DURING THE spring semester, the 
Appalachian dance group 
entertained the students. 




90/Student Government 



SANDY GOLDSMITH, poll worker, 
and candidate Mark Robison 
confer while a student picks up his 
ballot. 





A unique combination of 
Appalachian music and 
dance was one of the pro- 
grams brought on campus 
by student government. 

The Appalachian Dance 
and Music Ensemble per- 
formed in the Ballroom 
March 13. "Color the Mine 
Wars Black and Red" and 
"Fiddler" were two poetry 
selections interpreted in 
music and dance. The selec- 
tions by Dr. Louise McNeil 
Pease, state poet laureate, 
are from her new book, 
"The Elderberry Flood." 

In addition to separate 
music selections, dancers 
performed "Si' Bheag, Si' 
Mho'r," "Gemini," "Jubilee," 
and "Suite Barok." 

MEMBERS OF the Appalachian 
dance group feature duet dancing 
and an ensemble group in their 
presentation. 



Student Government/91 



Wrestlers boast 
All- Americans 



The 1979-80 Fairmont 
State wrestling team ended 
its season with a dual 
record of 12-0. 

In tournament action the 
team finished third in the 
Mid-West Classic, second in 
the Edinboro State In- 
vitational, second in the 
West Liberty State In- 
vitational, sixth in the final 
NAIA poll. 

Phil Gifford led the team 
with a 20-1 record. His only 
loss came in the finals of 
the national tournament. 

Gifford was champion at 
the Mid-West Classic, Edin- 
boro State Invitational, and 
West Liberty State In- 
vitational. He also received 
second place at the NAIA 
nationals. 

Being chosen as an NAIA 
standout was also on the list 
of Gifford's achievements. 

Another leading con- 
tender was Bruce Hinkle, 
who ended the season with 
a 28-3 record. 



Hinkle was champion at 
Edinboro State Invitational, 
West Liberty State In- 
vitational, and Mid-West 
Classic where he was voted 
outstanding wrestler at the 
tournament. He was chosen 
as a NAIA All-American. 
The defending national 
champion at 177, Hinkle re- 
ceived an injury that forced 
him to default to eighth 
place. 

Also having an out- 
standing season on the Fal- 
con team was Joe White 
with a 25-5-1 record. 

Among White's wins 
were second place in the 
Mid-West Classic, cham- 
pion at West Liberty State 
Invitational where he was 
named the tourney's out- 
standing wrestler, champion 
at Edinboro State In- 
vitational, fourth place at 
NAIA Nationals at 142, and 
was chosen as a NAIA All- 
American at 142. 



FSC 




Opp. 


30 


Youngstown State, Ohio 


14 


45 


California State, Pa. 


9 


27 


University of Akron, Ohio 


19 


30 


Marshall University 


14 


33 


Capital University, Ohio 


9 


42 


Washington & Jefferson, Pa. 


6 


32 


Waynesburg College, Pa. 


14 


33 


Edinboro State, Pa. 


19 


37 


West Liberty State 
University of 


13 


24 


Pittsburgh-Johnstown, Pa. 


21 


30 


Wright State University, Ohio 


15 


43 


Oakland University, Mich. 


14 



BRAD DORNICK tries to get his 
opponent into a bear hug position. 



BRUCE HINKLE gets his opponent 
into a cowboy position. 







M. 


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92/Wrestling 



Wrestlers 



(cont.) 



White was also named 
the fourth best freshman 
134 pounder in the country 
(NCAA included) by the 
Amateur Wrestling News. 

Among the top wrestlers 
on the 1979-80 team was 
Mike Geffrey, who had a 
21-4 record. 

Placing first in the Mid- 
West Classic, second in the 
Edinboro State Invitational 



and third in the West Liber- 
ty State Invitational were 
some of Geffrey's achieve- 
ments. 

Others on the team were 
Ken Narducci 13-8, Jeff 
Morris 6-8, Gig Dornick 5-8, 
Brad Dornick 13-12-1, Steve 
Dodge 14-9, Greg Morris 9-7, 
heavy weight class Bob 
Peiffley 6-6 and Charlie Cra- 
ven 3-5. 



STEVE DODGE has his opponent 
in a pancake position during their 
match. 




KEN NARDUCCI tries sprawling 
away from a single-leg hold. 



94/Wrestling 




GETTING HIS OPPONENT in a 
cradle position, Mike Geffrey tries 
to take down his foe. 



Wrestling program pinned 




NAIA CHOICES, Bruce Hinkle and 
Phil Gifford, practice one of their 
many techniques during a workout 
session. 



Cameron said that "not 
having a coach, a difficulty 
in scheduling matches, and 
an increase in the team's 
financial demands 
prompted the college to 
drop the program. Only two 
other schools in the state 
(Marshall University and 
West Liberty) had teams 
that would wrestle the Fal- 
cons, so FSC was forced to 
compete largely with out-of- 
state teams," Cameron said. 

The team, under Church's 
eight years of leadership, 
amassed a 74-23-2 record 
and produced five All 
Americans: Bruce Hinkle, 
Phil Gifford, Joe White, 
Rodney Baird and Mike Kir- 
by who became household 
words with their All-Ameri- 
can performances. 

To complete their eligibi- 
lity, some members of this 
year's squad are considering 
transferring to other col- 
leges. Church plans to re- 
main at the college as a full- 
time faculty member. 

There will be no more 
All-American wrestlers at 
Fairmont State College. 

Following the resignation 
of Coach Sam Church, the 
college dropped the pro- 
gram May 1. said Colin 
Cameron, athletic director. 



STEVE WHITLATCH served as 
the no. 2 player. 



> : a .4 



JERRY MULLINS shows his 
approval of his performance. 

COMPLETING HIS SWING is Ted 
Insco. 

ROGER WEAVER practices before 
tackling the regular course. 




Golfers place 
seventh in tourney 



The six-man golf team 
had to improve this year. 
Last year, the team was 
made entirely of freshmen. 

Holding the number one 
spot was Mike Crowley 
with Steve Whitlatch as 
number two who earned the 
Sportsperson of the month 
title sponsored by THE 



COLUMNS. 

The W.Va. conference has 
12 in its league holding 
nothern, southern and cen- 
tral showdowns. The golfers 
placed sixth out of nine in 
the southern, eighth out of 
nine in the central and 
fourth out of nine in the 
northern. 



96/Golf 



OPPONENT 


OUTCOME 


Shepherd (single) 


Won 


Central Regional 


Eighth 


CSC Spring Invitational 


Thirteenth 


Northern Regional 


Fourth 


Southern Regional 


Sixth 


WVC Tournament 


Seventh 




JERRY MULLINS moves on to the 
next green. 

TIM SMAILES waits for the 
outcome. 




MIKE CROWLEY checks out his 
swing. 



FRONT ROW: Steve Whitlatch, 
Tim Smailes, Mike Crowley; BACK 
ROW: Jerry Mullins, Roger Weaver, 
Ted Insco. 



Golf/97 



LUIS ORTEZA reaches for a long 
volley. 

Men's 

team 

returns 

The ball was in Fair- 
mont's court this year. The 
netters returned from the 
W.Va. tourney fifth in the 
conference with Wesleyan 
on top. 

One of the more impor- 
tant assets for the team was 
the return of Coach Craig 
White after an 8-year ab- 
sense. 

Dr. White started the 
team on a winter program 
of weights and aerobics. 
Six-thirty a.m. practices 
continued until the weather 
broke. White also increased 
the schedule by ten games. 

The 1980 team welcomed 
back Luis Orteza who 
served as the no. 1 player, 
with Keith Togans as no. 2. 

Jim Mcintosh went into 
the finals in fourth position 
which is quite an accom- 
plishment for the Falcons, 
said White. Also, the Rick 
McCandless and Jim Dolan 
duo beat the well-known 
Shepherd team of Wells 
and VanEmberg. But prob- 
ably the most memorable 
game for Coach White was 
when McCandless fought 
off six match points against 
Alderson-Broaddus' no. 3 
player in regular season. 
McCandless lost the game 
"but it was a high point for 
us," said White. 



BY THROWING the ball into the 
air, Jim Mcintosh prepares to serve. 

JERRY LAMBERT hits a forehand 
drive back to his opponent. 

MARK RADCLIFFE fights back by 
returning a fast volley. 




98/Mcn's Tennis 





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t 1 ; m 

f 4 1 






Opponent 


Outcome 


! Duquense University 


1-8 


W.Va. Tech 


7-2 


U. of Charleston 


0-9 


Alderson-Broaddus 


7-2 


W.Va. State 


9-0 


West Liberty 


0-9 


West Virginia University 


1-8 


Shepherd 


3-6 


Davis & Elkins 


7-2 


Wheeling 


5-4 


West Virginia University 


0-9 


Salem 


9-0 


California State, Pa. 


0-9 


W.Va. Wesleyan 


2-7 


Salem 


9-0 


West Liberty 


1-8 


W.Va. State 


9-0 


W.Va. Wesleyan 


2-7 


U. of Charleston 


3-6 


JIM DOLAN returns the ball with a 




backhand slice. 




Men's Tennis/99 





JIM DOLAN returns the ball with a 
backhand slice. 



TAKING ON A WESLEYAN 
OPPONENT, Rick McCandless 
moves in for a short return. 

KEITH TOGANS (top right) 
stretches to make his serve. 

MEN'S TEAM - FRONT ROW: Jim 
Mcintosh, Mark Radcliffe, Luis 
Orteza, Bob Summers; BACK 
ROW: Dr. Craig White, coach; Rick 
McCandless, Jim Dolan, Keith 
Togans. 



Men's Tennis/99 



Many hurdles 
to cross 



The men's track team 
compiled a 2-2 season's 
record in dual meets, de- 
feating Waynesburg College 
125-20 and Washington & 
Jefferson 111-34, while los- 
ing to California State 
twice, 82-63 and 103-42. The 
team finished third in the 
Wesleyan Invitational, fifth 
in the Glenville Invitational, 
and sixth in the Yellow 
Jacket Invitational. 

John Snodgrass estab- 
lished a new school record 
in the 5,000 meter run with 
a time of 16:14.9 and also 
gained NAIA national rank- 
ing with a 2:53.56 time in 
the marathon. 

Rick Dye achieved one of 
the NAIA's fastest times at 
2:18 in the 1,000 yard run 
indoors. 

The women's track team 
missed winning the West 
Virginia Conference track 
title for the second con- 
secutive year by the margin 
of a single point (79-78) to 
West Virginia Wesleyan. 
The team placed second in 
the Yellow Jacket In- 
vitational and third in the 
Marshall Invitational, while 
also compiling a 2-4 sea- 
son's record in dual meets 
against some of the strong- 
est small college women's 
teams in Maryland, Penn- 
sylvania, and West Virginia. 

Two members of the 

JANET HINERMAN, AIAW 
qualifier, school record setter (5'2"), 
won titles in the West Virginia 
Conference and at West Virginia 
State. 

MEN'S TEAM - FRONT ROW: 
Chad Austin, Greg Hott, Fritz, Loy, 
Terry Boyd, Tom Burns, Bill 
Weekley, Rick Dye, Tim Prickett: 
BACK ROW: Brian Hamrick, 
Harley Riddle, Steve Van Gilder, 
Greg St. Pierre, Brad Martyn, John 
Snodgrass, Mike Williams, Scott 
Gossard, Adam Bennett. 



track team (Janet Hinerman 
and Annie Mack) became 
the first Fairmont State 
coeds to qualify for AIAW 
competition beyond state 
level. 



GREG HOTT uses every effort to 
gain on the long jump. 

JAVELIN THROWER Scott 
Gossard fights a glaring sun. 

SCOTT GOSSARD clears the 
mark. 




100/Track 




% 



ANNIE MACK was the leading 
scorer for the team and set three 
school records in 100 meters, 200 
meters, and long jump. 

FRITZ LOY, 120 yard high hurdles 
runner, keeps stride at the 
Wesleyan meet. 





TIM WARD, 110 meter high 
hurdles, paces his Glenville 
opponent. 

CAROLINE TOOTHMAN edges up 
to her opponent. 

WOMEN'S TEAM - FRONT 
ROW: Robin Bennett, Janet 
Hinerman, Annie Mack, Caroline 
Toothman, Sharon Houston, 
Debbie Keener, Linda Cutlip, 
Donna Jones; BACK ROW: Sandy 
Goldsmith, Michelle McKee, Donna 
Hopkins, Linda Cross, Shellie 
Wright, Cathy Arbogast, Brenda 
Farley, Mary Gerrard. 



Track/101 



Still looking for a winning season 



Fifth place isn't so bad, 
especially if you spent last 
season in the bottom spot. 
That's exactly what hap- 
pened to the baseball team. 

Competing against eleven 
other teams in the WVIAC, 
the diamondmen progressed 
well and finished strong ac- 
cording to Larry Hill, who 
stepped in as the new 
coach. 

Wanting to play a very 
competitive schedule, Hill 
went into the season appre- 
hensive, not knowing any- 
thing about the teams down 
south. 



DAVE BARR was ready to play AB 
after warming up. 

JIM ASHTON misses a tag by an 
Alderson-Broaddus opponent. 




102/Baseball 



Under team standings, 
Dave Manzo, a junior, led 
the statistics as top hitter at 
.294. Ron Whiting was cited 
as having the most RBIs and 
home runs. On the pitching 
mound, Ken Bissett settled 
in as top pitcher with three 
out of four wins. Other 



pitchers deserving recogni- 
tion were Bobby Harman 
and Luc Tousignant, a new- 
comer to the Falcon bench. 

Other new players were 
Freddie Wright, Raymond 
Bonnett, catcher, Steve Wil- 
liams — who did well de- 
fensively and Mike Thomp- 



son, leading freshman hitter 
at .316. Stew Warren also 
saw action for the first time 
as a pitcher. 

"They're a young squad 
with a future in front of 
them," said Hill. "We're 
looking for a winning sea- 
son next year." 




.*«- 



-- . 




















I 




RAY BONNETT and Dave Custer 
practice in the Feaster Center. 



OPPONENT OUTCOME 


High Point, N.C. 


W,L 


Westfield State, Mass. 


T 


Gardner-Webb, N.C. 


L 


JNC at Charlotte 


L 


Winthrop, S.C. 


L 


California State, Pa. 


L,L 


West Liberty 


L,L 


Davis and Elkins 


L,L 


W.Va. State 


L,W 


Alderson-Broaddus 


L,L 


Marietta, Ohio 


L,L 


Concord 


L,L 


Salem 


L,L 


Glenville 


W,W 


W.Va. Wesleyan 


L,L 


U. of Charleston 


L,W 


W.Va. Tech 


W,L 



ASSISTANT COACH Anthony 
Cann and Bucky Davis eye home 
plate. 

COACH HILL discusses the grim 
situation with leading RBI and 
home run hitter, Ron Whiting. 



FALCONS ON THE bench 
impatiently wait for the next 
inning. 




Baseball/103 



RANDY RADER runs back a pass 
during a play-off game, while a 
teammate blocks a defensive 
player. 



Group 

sports 

improve 




JOHN URSO receives a volley 
during a Greek meet. 



Participation grew in in- 
tramurals with 400 more 
women and almost 800 
more men. 

The Feaster Center aided 
the program in its avail- 
ability. Racquetball was 
also introduced to the pro- 
gram. 

Fairmont I led Division I 
with 1,370 points and Delta 
Zeta compiled 2,045 for the 
year under Division II. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 
reigned as championship 



champions (1,805) but Theta 
Xi held the most overall 
points (1,905). 

The men had 3,844 partic- 
ipating with 1,710 total from 
the women. 

Basketball was the favor- 
ite sport among women 
while the top for men was 
hard to determine due to 
large participation in sev- 
eral of the major sports in- 
cluding softball, flag foot- 
ball and volleyball. 



A CRY OF VICTORY comes from 
the Delta Zeta team members. 




104/Intramurals 



DELTA ZETA basketball A TOUCHDOWN was hard-earned 
participants listen to a word of by Bruce Capp of the TKE 
advice from their coach. fraternity. 




INDEPENDENTS compete in a 
football game on the soccer field. 



Intramurals/105 




106/ Commencement 



ROSE HESTON is congratulated 
by President Hardway before 
receiving her diploma from B.G. 
Dunn, registrar. 



1980 Commencement 





Fairmont State College's 
109th annual com- 
mencement exercises were 
held Saturday May 10, at 10 
a.m. in the Feaster Center. 

Highlighting the event 
was the commencement ad- 
dress given by guest speak- 
er Douglas Edwards, CBS 
news correspondent. 

Edwards, currently the 
anchorman of "CBS Mid- 
Day News," spoke of the 
need for more commu- 



nication in today's society. 

He stressed a positive 
outlook for the future, and 
encouraged graduates to al- 
ways strive for excellence. 

More than 300 graduates 
received degrees during the 
event, held for the second 
year in FSC's athletic com- 
plex. 



DR. JAMES LARUE and Dr. Yu 
San Wang marshall the prospective 
graduates to their seats. 




SPECIAL GUEST SPEAKER for 
SB the ceremonies was Douglas 
Edwards, CBS new correspondent. 



GRADUATES listen to the 
commencement address given by 
Mr. Edwards 




Commencement/ 107 



WELCOMING THE CROWD is 
President Wendell G. Hardway. 



Commencement 



(cont. 



Dr. H. D. Peters, recently 
selected vice president for 
academic affairs, presented 
the degree candidates, while 
diplomas were presented by 
B. G. Dunn, registrar. 

Processional and reces- 
sional music was provided 
by Frances Moody, and 
Jamie Stewert, senior music 
major sang "The Impossible 
Dream," and the Fairmont 
State College Alma Mater. 



JAMIE STEWERT entertained the 
THE CROWD awaits the beginning crowd by singing "The Impossible 
of the commencement ceremonies. Dream." 




108/Commencement 




KELLY KENT clutches her diploma 
and cap outside the Feaster Center. 

LISA TIANO is congratulated 
following the commencement 
ceremonies. 




FAMILY AND FRIENDS 
congratulate a proud graduate. 



Commencement/ 109 



Dorm vs. apartment 



Is living in an apartment 
all it's made up to be or 
would students prefer living 
in the dorms? 

Some students choose to 
live in a dorm the first year, 
then get an apartment after 
that. Others choose to live 
in the dorm all four years 
and still others do not live 
in the dorms at all. 

"There is a serious hous- 
ing problem in Fairmont," 
said Ann Lester, director of 
women's housing. 

The campus can house 
134 men in Pence Hall, 163 
women in Morrow Hall, 
and 150 women in North 
Hall. 

When Morrow and North 
are full, women students 
are referred to an off- 
campus dorm called Mor- 
gan Hall, which houses 84 
women. 

When the dorms on 
campus are filled, Lester 
takes approximately 130 
women on a waiting list in 
case of a cancellation, but 



advises them to try to find 
housing elswhere. 

The dorms on campus 
and apartments in the area 
are usually taken by Febru- 
ary or March for the fall 
semester, so students that 
want them must have their 
applications in early. 

The cost of living in an 
apartment can range from 
$60-150 a month per person 
with 2-4 people living in 
one apartment. The cost of 
utilities is usually not in- 
cluded in that total. 

The dorms on campus 
cost approximately $800- 
1,000 a semester. That price 
includes room and board. 

Steve Dawson, a fresh- 
man pharmacy major from 
Buckhannon, wanted to live 
in Pence Hall, but did not 
get his application in on 
time. "I wanted to live in 
the dorm the first year so I 
could meet a lot of people. 
Second semester I started 
meeting a lot of people." 



COLLEGE LIFE can be very tiring 
so Kim Mullinex takes a nap in her 
dorm room between classes. 




DEBBIE AYERS puts her feet up to BEVERLY BOLLAND prepares 
take a rest after classes in North herself something to eat in her 
Hall. dorm room between classes. 



110/Dorm- vs. -apartment 





TALKING ON THE TELEPHONE TAKING TIME OUT from studying 
o some of her friends, Susi Cross Joe Queen, Steve Dawson, and J.K. 
makes plans to go out. Mctee play a game of cards. 



FRANK RUNION studies in his 
dorm room at Pence Hall. 




1 



Dorm- vs. -apartment/111 



Dorm 



(cont.) 



Steve now enjoys living 
in an apartment. 

Students who live in the 
dorms and apartments have 
their own reasons for doing 
so. Beverly Bolland, senior 
office administration major 
from Charleston, has lived 
in a dorm for four years. 

"Rules are strict, consid- 
ering you are old enough to 
live away from home," said 
Beverly, "but you meet a lot 
of people." 

Beverly is not the only 
one who thinks that the 
rules are too strict. Donna 
Hopkins, freshman ra- 
dio/TV communication ma- 
jor from Oak Hill, and her 
roommate Annie Mack, 
sophomore psychology ma- 
jor from Oak Hill, both feel 
that the rules are too strict 
and need to be changed. 

Mary Ann Gorrell, soph- 
omore business major from 
Parkersburg, feels that the 
rules are too strict "but you 
meet a lot of people and 
have a lot of fun." 

"You have a lot of free- 
dom," is how Joe Rose, jun- 
ior engineering major from 
Elyria, Ohio, feels about liv- 
ing in an apartment. 

Many of the students that 
live in the dorms say that 
noise passes through the 
walls and it is sometimes 
hard to study. Some apart- 



ment students have prob- 
lems with landlords while 
others do not. Some land- 
lords refuse to repair things 
like water and lighting 
fixtures, door hinges and 
roofs and ceilings that leak. 
Whether students decide 
to live in an apartment or a 
dorm, there are always go- 
ing to be advantages and 
disadvantages to consider. 

DONNA HOPKINS folds her 
clothes to put them away in her 
dorm room at Morrow Hall. 

WHILE TALKING on the telephone 
at his apartment, Bill Gorrell tries 
to study. 




PLAYING PING PONG in the 
lobby at Pence Hall is Martin Hite. 






u 






Mb, jH 








1 • 








En) j 






fe . 


W *fl - 








' Wm 




o 




^^^^Hfci^^^t 









KEEPING IN SHAPE is important 
to Joe Rose who lifts weights in his 
living room at his apartment. 



112/ Dorm- vs. -apartment 




Dorm-vs. -apartment/113 




FACES . . . 

and the friendly 



pie behind them 



MARK LOSH utilizes the card 
catalog in the FSC library. 



Wendell Hardway, President 



Wendell G. Hardway be- 
came president of Fairmont 
State College July 1, 1973. 

A graduate of Cowen 
High School, Cowen, he 
earned B.S. and MA. de- 
grees from West Virginia 
University. He later re- 
ceived his Ph.D. from Ohio 
State University. 

Dr. Hardway began his 



profession as an educator in 
1949, after a tour of duty in 
the U.S. Army. He held 
three positions at Glenville 
State College, including 
chairman of the Division of 
Education from 1954-66. He 
then served as president of 
Bluefield State College from 
1966 until his appointment 
at FSC. 





' / \ : . A- '' 



ONE OF President Hardway's more 
pleasant duties is congratulating 
seniors on graduation day. 

AN INFORMAL POSE of Dr. 
Hardway, his wife Hannah and 
their collie. 

COLLECTING GUNS is one of the 
president's spare-time hobbies. 




116/Administration, Staff 



Administration and Staff 



WILLIAM BORAM, Ph.D., Vice President for 

Academic Affairs, Professor of English (1963-67, 

1970-79) 

GEORGE CANNON, M.A., Vice President of 

Student Affairs, Associate Professor of Psychology 

EDWARD GROSE, Ph.D., Vice President for 

Finance and Facilities 




H. DEAN PETERS, Ph.D., Assistant to Academic 
Vice-President, Professor of History 
HARRY J. HADLEY, Ed. D., Dean of Teacher 
Education, Professor of Education 
PAUL E. EDWARDS, Ph.D., Dean of the 
Community College, Professor of History 
BILLY G. DUNN, Ed.D., Registrar and Director of 
Management Information Systems, Professor of 
Commerce 

JOHN CONAWAY, M.A., Director of Admissions 
and Assistant Registrar, Assistant Professor of 
Education 

LOIS LAUGHLIN, M.A., Assistant to the President, 
Assistant Professor of Education 
COLIN CAMERON, M.A., Director of Athletics, 
Associate Professor of Physical Education 
HOMER COX, B.S., Assistant Vice President for 
Finance and Facilities 

ROBERT STEMPLE, M.A., Director of Clarksburg 
Center 

CHARLES MANLY, M.A., Director of Learning 
Resource Center, Associate Professor of Radio and 
TV 

EDWARD BOCK, M.S.E.E., Director of Computer 
Center, Assistant Professor of Commerce 
FRANK PULICE, JR., B.A., Director of Food Service 
STANLEY GROVES, M.A., Director of Student 
Center and Bookstore 

REBECCA BYRD LOFSTEAD, B.S., Coordinator of 
Public Relations and Development. (Fall Semester) 
RACHEL GROSS, A.B., Ed., Coordinator of Public 
Relations and Development, (Spring Semester) 



Student Affairs Staff 





BLAIR MONTGOMERY, M.A. Assistant to the 

Vice-president for Student Affairs 

WILLIAM SHAFFER, M.A., Coordinator of Student 

Affairs Counselors 

MICHAEL BELMEAR, M.A., Student Affairs 

Counselor 

MICHELE CASTEEL, M.A., Student Affairs 

Counselor 

WILLIAM JULIAN, M.A., Student Affairs 

Counselor 



Library Staff 




MARY JO FAYOYIN, MLS, Instructor of Library 
Science 

MARY HUPP, MLS, Associate Professor of Library 
Science 

MARSHA NOLF, MLS, Associate Professor of 
j^ Library Science 

"^i/: ... RUTH ANN POWELL, MLS, Associate Professor of 
Library Science 

JEAN SIMONOF, MLS, Assistant Professor of 
Library Science 



Administration, Staff/ 117 



DR. EDWARD CLAREMONT 
shows a respirator to visiting high 

MICROBIOLOGY STUDENTS school students during Allied 

practice with microscopes. Health Day. 




David Batson, M.A., Associate Professor of 

Technology 

Robert Bauer, Ph.D., Coordinator, Associate 

Professor of Psychology 

David Bohnke, Ph.D., Chairman of HPERS, 

Professor of Physical Education 

Diana Boyle, B.S., Instructor of Nursing 




118/Division of Allied Health 



•Allied Health 



Allied Health has devel- 
oped from one associate 
health degree in 1973 to six 
associate science degrees, a 
bachelor of science degree 
and a one-year certificate in 
1980. 

With limited enrollment, 



the division doesn't ex- 
perience much change in 
enrollment. 

A new bachelors degree 
has been added in Allied 
Health Administration. Also 
part of the rapid growth 
were six new classes. 



Fairmont also has the dis- 
tinction of having the only 
school in the state with a 
veterinary assistant tech- 
nology degree. 



New faculty member Pen- 
ny Dawson was added as 
full-time instructor of nurs- 
ing. 



STUDENTS IN MICROBIOLOGY 
study blood samples. 



DEBBIE HARLEY practices filling a 
syringe. 







Wiiliam Brown, Ph.D., Coordinator, 

Professor of Biology 

Ruth Burns, M.A., Assistant Professor of 

Business 

William Carpenter, D.V.M., Coordinator, 

Assistant Professor of Veterinary Assistant 

Technology 

Leta Carson, Ph.D., Chairwoman of Fine 

Arts, Professor of Music 



Division of Allied Health/ 119 



STUDENT NURSES Kathy Devison STUDENTS OF VETERINARY 
and Kathy Conley practice taking TECHNOLOGY listen to a 
and reading blood pressure gauges. discussion on animal care. 




Dotson Cather, M.S.M.E., Associate 

Professor of Technology 

Samuel Church, Ph.D., Professor of 

Psychology 

Edward CJaremont, M.M.S.C, Coordinator, 

Assistant Professor of Respiratory Therapy 

Dorothy Coffindaffer, M.A., Assistant 

Professor of Business Education 





120/Division of Allied Health 



BECKY KINER takes care of dogs 
for veterinary technology class. 

CAROL MICHAEL receives 
instructions from a Fairmont 
fireman about extinguishing fires. 





Carl CoJebank, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of 

Education 

James Coleman, Ph.D., Professor of 

Chemistry 

Giennis Cunningham, Ed.D., Coordinator of 

Elementary Education, Director of 

Affirmative Action, Professor of Education 

Jane Dumire, M.A. Director of Publications, 

Coordinator of Journalism, Assistant 

Professor of English and Journalism 



Division of Allied Health/121 



Commerce 



The Division of Com- 
merce experienced a gener- 
al increase in all depart- 
ments this year. 

Two new faculty joined 
the division — Mike Elliott, 
marketing accounting, and 
Phyllis Dunlevy, data pro- 



cessing. 

Human Relations, taught 
by Marvin Gould, certified 
public accountant, was 
added to the curriculum. 
The course explored com- 
munication and leadership 
in the area of business. 



Data processing received 
a new home in the weight 
room of Colebank Building. 

Accounting labs are avail- 
able for students having 



problems with classes. Dur- 
ing lab, students receive in- 
dividual help from account- 
ing students and instructors. 



DOROTHY COFFINDAFFER, education, lectures before letting 
Assistant professor of business students work on their own. 




Michael Elliott, Instructor of Commerce 
Harry Faulk, D. FA, Associate Professor of 

Music 

John Fitch, MA. Associate Professor of 

Sociology, Data Processing 

Eleanor Ford, M.S. Professor of Physics 



1 




122/Division of Commerce 



LENNY MARSHALL TALLIES 
figures for his business class. 





Elizabeth Frye, M.S., Assistant Professor of 

Mathematics 

Michael Fulda, Ph.D., Professor of Political 

Science 

Steven Gatrell, M.A., Associate Professor of 

History 

James Goodwin //, M.S.M.E., Associate 

Professor of Technology 



Division of Commerce/123 



STUDENTS in a secondary 
education block class spread out to 
work on a group problem. 

A STUDENT mans the camera 
during his micro-teaching 
experience for block classes. 

VIDEO-TAPING is an important 
aid in public speaking, as these 
three students work on micro- 
teaching. 





Ronald Goodwin, MBA, Instructor of 

Commerce 

William Griscom, Ed.D., Assistant Professor 

of Technology 
Carter Grocott, MBA, Associate Professor of 

Commerce 

James Hales, Ed.D., Chairman, Director, 

Professor of Technology 



Idfcll 




124/Division of Education 




Education 



Students are interested in 
teaching again — the up- 
swing in enrollment has 
proven it. 

The Division of Educa- 
tion added three new spe- 



A STUDENT in Children's 
Literature class keeps the children 
entertained with story hour. 

VISUAL AIDS help keep the 
children's attention in story hour. 



cializations — learning and 
behavior disabilities and 
the gifted. With this change 
came new faculty member 
Dr. Byron Naum. 

Despite the new areas 
and increase, Dr. Harry 
Hadley, dean of teacher ed- 
ucation, said that there is a 
lack of students in the spe- 
cial fields. Special educa- 
tion, as defined by Dr. Don- 
ald Moroose, professor of 



education, is "specially de- 
signed instruction, at no 
cost to parents or guardians 
to meet the unique needs of 
a handicapped child, in- 
cluding classroom instruc- 
tion and hospital instruc- 
tion." 

Fairmont State was 
founded in 1867 on the 
basis of preparing teacher. 






MeJanie Harris, M.A., Assistant Professor of 

Mathematics 

Stephen Haynes, Ph.D., Professor of Physics 

Lewis Herring, Ed.D., Professor of 

Technology 

Melva Hess, MS, Professor of Home 

Economics 



Division of Education/125 



JOHN RETTON applies makeup 
under the direction of JoAnn 
Lough. 

The Arts 

Wanting to improve de- 
velopment of professional 
programs, the Division of 
Fine Arts continues to fill 
the urgent need of service 
to the college and commu- 
nity. 

The addition of a bach- 
elor's degree in graphic arts 
brought an increase in that 
field. Radio and T.V. com- 
munications also ex- 
perienced "growing pains." 

The W.Va. Arts and Hu- 
manities Council helped 
sponsor Erik Fredricksen, 
Broadway actor and author- 
ity in stage combat. Starring 
in the Masquers' fall pro- 
duction of "Hamlet." Fred- 
ricksen helped stage sword 
combat for the play and 
taught a course in fencing 
as a sport and art. 

Music students attended 
the state Music Educators' 
National Conference while 
the Collegiates, the touring 
choir, made over 20 off- 
campus appearances. Con- 
certs were provided during 
the year as a requirement 
for performing groups and 
for entertainment purposes. 



KAREN OLLIS plays recorder in 
the new music appreciation class. 

MIKE LOPEZ AND DALE KITTLE 
play another round of the fight 
song during the Coal Bowl. 




Nancy Home, M. Ed., Assistant professor of 

Business Education 

Marie Horvath, B.S., Coordinator, Assistant 

professor of Medical Records 

Judith Hoyer, M.S., Associate professor of 

Economics 
John Hussey, Ph.D., Professor of English 




126/Division of Fine Arts 



WORKS IN CLAY were exhibited 
during the fall by ceramics 
students. 

MIKE SOUCH makes a linoleum 
print for printing class. 







4ifc£ 




Byron Jackson, Ph.D., Chairman of Language 

and Literature, Professor of English 

Lowell Johnson, Ed.D., Professor of 

Education 

Tulasi Josh/, Ph.D., Professor of Geography 

William Ken, M.A., Assistant Professor of 

Physical Education 



Division of Fine Arts/127 



KEITH GOLDSBERRY, sophomore 
music major, was ready to get out 
of his uniform after the Coal Bowl. 

MARY RILEY learns how to apply 
makeup. 



The Arts 



(cont. 



"Experience 79," hosted 
by the Fine Arts division, 
introduced freshmen and 
the public to its potential 
during the first week of the 
fall semester. Outdoor con- 
certs, portrait making and 
theatrical makeup drew a 
continuous flow of students 
and outsiders to the 
"round" building. 

To improve the general 
education of music, a 
recorder/appreciation class 
was added, focusing on ap- 
preciation through partici- 
pation. The intercollegiate 
debate team traveled to 
contests at William and 
Mary, U.S. Naval Academy, 
University of Pennsylvania 
and Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity. Debate team standouts 
were Brenda Gould, Pat 
Wilson, Cheri Renick and 
Brenda Paknic. Dis- 
tinguished individual deba- 
ters were Debbie Booth, 
Steve Jones, John Hofbauer, 
Cathy O'Dell and Gina Rug- 
gerio. Fairmont hosted the 
fifth consecutive state high 
school forensics tourna- 
ment, with Suzanne Snyder 
as director. 



DEBBIE BENNETT, Brenda 
Shirkey, and Chris Boyce 
represented FSC's MENC chapter 
at the state fall conference at 
lackson's Mill. 




Wayne Kime, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

English 

Richard Kupreanik, M.Ed., Assistant 

Professor of Technology 

WiJIiam Laughlin, Jr., M.A., Coordinator, 

Professor of Economics 

Loy Leonard, M.A., Associate Professor of 

Technology 





Itl4l 




128/Division M Fine Arts 




JOHN CLOVIS, associate professor 
of art, helps students individually 
in painting class for oils and 
acrylics. 




Yuan Liu, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

Technology 

Earl McLaughlin, Ed.D., Professor of 

Education 

Martha MiKer, Ed.D., Professor of Nursing 

Frances Moody, M.A., Associate Professor of 

Music 



Division of Fine Arts/129 



WEIGHT LIFTING equipment 
helps keep athletes in shape and is 
offered for student use. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION offers a 
variety of choices to the students. 
General phys. ed. students pick 
archery as one of their units. 




Anne Morgan, MA Assistant Professor of 

English 

Donald Moroose, Ed.D., Coordinator, 

Educational Foundations, Professor of 

Education 

Deborah Morrison, MA, Instructor of Nursing 

Orville Naegele, MS, Associate Professor of 

Geology 




130/Division of HPERS 



HPERS 



Little change was found 
in the Division of Health, 
Physical Education, Recrea- 
tion and Safety. 



In the area of physical ed- 
ucation, a new series of 
courses on coaching was 
added. 



Stephen Mahaney, associ- 
ate professor of physical ed- 
ucation, worked on a "learn 
to swim" program for the 




young and adults through 
the community college. 

Dr. Joseph Bundy, profes- 
sor of health education, 
stated that innovations were 
made in environment health 
concepts and all areas of 
health education because of 
the environmental impact 
on society. 



VOLLEYBALL, along with most 
other phys. ed. classes is conducted 
in the Feaster Center. 

CORRECT STANCE is necessary 
for accurate shooting. 

BILL KUROSKI and Doug Jamiel 
use weight-lifting machines while 
football is out of season. 





Byron Naum, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

Education 

Joanna NesseJroad, MS, Associate Professor 

of Home Economics 

Mildred Newcome, MA, Associate Professor 

of English 

Thomas NunnaJly, M.Ed., Assistant 

Professor of Technology 



Division of HPERS/131 



With hopes of instilling 
culture in the college and 
further preparing teachers, 
the Division of Language 
and Literature has remained 
stable in enrollment. 

Production is the greatest 
in the educational field. Stu- 
dents can receive teaching 
degrees in English, foreign 
languages, library science 
and journalism. 

The college library spon- 
sored "Be With a Book for a 
Day," in the fall and found 
that "The Amityville Hor- 
ror" was the most popular 
book among college stu- 
dents. Next in line was 
"Gone With the Wind" and 
"Lord of the Rings." 

Summertime included a 
course in French for chil- 
dren conducted by Chris- 
tiane Sweeney, associate 
professor of French. 

Library science students 
and instructors attended the 
W.Va. Library Association 
Fall Conference. Editors on 
the newspaper and year- 
book staffs traveled to Ohio 
University, Athens, Ohio, 
for summer workshops with 
other colleges and univer- 
sities across the nation. 



A FOUNDATIONS STUDENT uses 
a controlled reader to increase his 
reading speed. 




Barbara Nutter, M.A., Assistant Professor of 

English 
Michael Overking, M.A. Associate Professor 

of Speech 

John Parks, M.A., Assistant Professor of 

Technology 

Ronald Pearse, M.A., Assistant Professor of 

Psychology 



l*"*! 

T' 



P 





132/Division of Language and Literature 




— Language and Literature 




COLONEL CHARLES SAVEDGE, 
nationally known journalism 
educator, leads a workshop held on 
campus. 

TEACHING A CHILDREN'S 
FRENCH CLASS is Christiane 
Sweeney, French professor. 

FOUNDATIONS READING 
CLASS helps students improve 
their basic English skills. 

RANDY SHILLINGBURG, THE 
COLUMNS' editor reads copy for 
an issue of the paper. 






Flora Petro, M.A., Coordinator, Assistant 

Professor of Business Education 

Daniel Phares, B.S., Coordinator, Instructor 

of Medical Lab Technology 

John Pheasant, M.A, Associate Professor of 

Technology 

Walter Phillips, M.A., Associate Professor of 

Technology 



Division of Language and Literature/133 



CHEMISTRY STUDENTS use a 
lab manual to follow steps in 
performing an experiement. 

"We are constantly look- 
ing for new methods," said 
Dr. William Ruoff, division 
chairman of science and 
mathematics. 

Within the division, de- 
partments of biology, chem- 
istry, mathematics and 
physics reside. Dr. Steve 
Stephenson has developed a 
herbarium containing 1,600 
vascular and fungi speci- 
mens from West Virginia 
and the outer reaches of 
Montana and the Rocky 
Mountains, Biology students 
gain knowledge by further 
research. 

Under physical science, 
Dr. Raman Richardson, as- 
sociate professor of physi- 
cal science, uses videotapes 
of natural phenomena in 
teaching. Elementary stu- 
dents are brought in for ele- 
mentary education majors 
so they can have practical 
experience in teaching. 



DR. WILLIAM PRITCHETT points 
out to his zoology class the parts of 
a shark. 




William Phillips, Ed.D., Professor of 

Education 

Alan Poling, M.A., Instructor of Technology 

Gail Pope, M.A., Instructor of Commerce 

William Potter, M.A, Associate Professor of 

Economics, Regents Degree Coordinator 





134/Division of Science and Mathematics 



CHEMISTRY STUDENT carefully 
mixes chemicals during lab. 



The Sciences 




ZOOLOGY STUDENT Lisa 
Burnside gets acquainted with a 
shark that will soon be dissected. 

STUDENTS ATTEMPT to mix the 
correct combination of chemicals 
to achieve their desired substance. 




Harry Priester, Ed.D., Coordinator of 
Secondary Education, Professor of Education 
William Pritchett, Ph.D., Professor of Biology 
Judith Radciiff, M.S., Associate Professor of 
Home Economics 

Rayman Richardson, Ph.D., Professor of 
Physical Science 



Division of Science and Mathematics/135 



SEVERAL STUDENTS calculate 
data with a calculator during a 
biology lab. 

DONNA RADCLIFF and George 
Holloway experiment with 
machinery in an electronics class. 

A BIOLOGY STUDENT uses 
specimens in test tubes while 
performing an experiment in 
biology lab. 




David Ritchie, M.A., Instructor of Business 

Education 

William Ruoff, Ph.D., Chairman of Science 

and Mathematics, Professor of Chemistry 

Patricia Ryan, Ph.D., Foreign Student 

Adviser, Professor of Political Science 

Frederick Schaupp, Ed.D., Chairman of 

Commerce, Professor of Economics, Business 




136/Division of Science and Mathematics 




PAIBOON TANGYUNYONG 
dissects a preserved shark filled 
with latex to locate and identify 
internal parts. 



The Sciences 



(cont.) 




The student affiliates of 
the American Chemical So- 
ciety traveled to Carnegie- 
Mellon Research Institute in 
Pittsburgh. Speakers 
brought on campus include 
Dr. George Young, of the 
Norton Company, Akron 
Ohio; Dr. Bodi Douglas, 
University of Pittsburgh; 
and Dr. David Hendriker of 
Ohio University, Athens. 

Retiring from 32 years of 
teaching was Professor of 
Physics Eleanor Ford, 
who was the coordinator of 
Physics and Physical Sci- 
ence. 



DR. WILLIAM PRITCHETT uses 
an overhead to instruct an 
advanced biology class. 




John Schooley, M.M., Associate Professor of 

Music 

Carol Scott, M.A., Chairwoman of Allied 

Health Division, Associate Professor of 

Nursing 

Robert Shan, Ph.D., Professor of Biology 

Betty Sherman, M.A., Associate Professor of 

Speech 



Division of Science and Mathematics/137 



Social Science 



Changes of all sorts were 
made within the Division of 
Social Science. 

Drawing from the needs 
of students, curriculum and 
the contents of the Social 
Work program were 
changed. 

All degree programs were 
reviewed in order to find 
active ways and means of 
helping students. 

A two-year degree in Le- 
gal Assistance was added to 
the curriculum. 

The advising system was 



improved by assigning indi- 
vidual advisers to specialize 
in different problems in the 
social science areas. 

The West Virginia His- 
tory Association Seminar 
was held on the FSC 
campus and was moderated 
by Joanne VanHorn, faculty 
member. 

Dr. Yu San Wang, divi- 
sion chairman said the en- 
rollment has been stable, 
and that social science re- 
tains more students than 
ever before. 





/ 



** 



STUDENTS LISTEN to a lecture A STUDENT takes a psychology 
during class. exam. 



V 



/ 




David Sherren, Ed. D., Professor of 

Technology 

Stephen Smigocki, Ph. D., Associate 

Professor and coordinator of art. 

Steven Stephenson, Ph. D., Assistant 

Professor of biology. 

Alien Swanson, MSE, Associate Professor of 

Technology. 





138/Division of Social Science 




RONALD PEARSE lectures to a STUDENTS take notes during 
psychology class. behavior modification class. 



k 









■ 




Us 10* 





Charles Swanson, MA, Coordinator of 

Speech and Theatre, Associate Professor of 

Speech. 

Elizabeth Swiger, Ph. D., Professor of 

Chemistry. 

Sally Tarley, MA, Instructor of Business Ed. 

William Thompson, M. Ed., Associate 

Professor of Technology. 



Division of Social Science/139 



KEITH TOGANS WORKS on an 
electrostatic plate. 

Continually trying to be 
responsive to the industries, 
the Division of Technology 
changes its programs and 
classes to meet their needs. 

Dr. Randy Williams, as- 
sistant professor of tech- 
nology, wrote two textbooks 
for classes in mining engi- 
neering. 

Home Economics stu- 
dents got a taste of special 
cooking during a trip to the 
Greenbriar. Technology stu- 
dents also made field trips 
to Westinghouse of Fair- 
mont, the Volkswagon plant 
in Pennsylvania and the 
Eastern Mining Expedition 
in Charleston. 



CRYSTAL PRATT receives 
instruction in tooling leather in 
crafts class. Other projects taught 
are ceramics and copper tooling. 

KELCIE SMITH adds margarine to 
her recipe. 




Joanne Van Horn, 

M.A., Associate 

Professor of History 

MariJee Veasey, 

M.A., Associate 

Professor of Speech 

Yu San Wang, Ph.D., 

Chairman of 

Social Science, 

Professor of 

Political Science 

Richard Wardian, 

M.A., Assistant 

Professor of History 

Daniel Weber, 

M.A., Assistant 

Professor of Speech 

140/Division of Technology 








Technology 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS student works 
on a major welding project. 










Dorothy Wedge, 
Ph.D., Professor of 
Education 
Robert Whiteman, 
M.Ed., Associate 
Professor of Technology 
Margaret Willard, 
M.A., Associate 
Professor of Education 
William Williams, 
M.E., Assistant 
Professor of Technology 
James Young, 
M.S., Associate 
Professor of Geography 



Division of Technology/141 



Tech. 



(cont.) 



DR. GRISCOM discusses principles 
of ceramics with one of his 
students. 

A TECH STUDENT works 
diligently on a welding project. 











JR^^nj^H 




\JhM 




^B 


4^v^ 








Catherine Freeman, Library Technical 

Assistant 

PrisciJla Holder, Library Technical Assistant 

Tom Marlowe, Library Technical Assistant 

Barbara Snyder, Library Technical Assistant, 

Clarksburg Center 




142/Division of Technology 




SPEAKING AT the National 
Industrial Arts Symposium at 
Jackson's Mill is Dr. James Hales, 
Chairman of FSC's Division of 
Technology. Hales was also 
director of the Symposium. 

WORKING ON CERAMICS, Carl 
Lenoir files down the rough edges 
on a piece of greenware. 

ANN CALABRASE and Candy 
Corl tryout a new recipe in a home 
economics cooking class. 





Robert Heffner, Graphics Specialist 
Robert Moffett, LRC Technician 
Barbara Tetrick, Staff Photographer 



Division of Technology/143 



Greeks 



*>m 



BARB OLIVERIO checks her skis 
before taking off on the ROTC 
cross-country skiing trip. 




ALPHA XI DELTA - FRONT Smith; ROW 2: Crystal Wolfe, Renee Campbell, Margie Bradshaw, 
ROW: Barbara Oliverio, Denise Tammy Martin, Carol Hatfield, Pam Hennen. 
Spradling, Debby Wills, Kelcie Cathy Figler; ROW 3: Kathy Lewis, 



144/ Organizations 




DELTA ZETA - FRONT ROW: 
Colleen Clayton, Denise Taylor, 
Charlene Hart, Elaine Dellamea, 
Becky Clagett, Cathy O'Dell, 
Cheryl Snodgrass, Margaret Dailey, 



Crystal Mick; ROW 2: Jill Halbert, 
Joyce Fink, Linda Cogar, Tammie 
Chandler, Carolyn McKain, Becky 
Cupp, Danielle Reed, Kelly Gibbs, 
Kim Wilson; ROW 3: Linda Lang, 



Brenda Cutsy, Lisa Williams, Robin 
Woody, Karen Canfield, Sally 
Haddox, Debbie Perrine, Kim 
Boyce, Stephany Phillips, Donna 
Harrison; ROW 4: Tina Johnson, 



Jean Williams, Donna Cunningham, 
Jackie Patterson, Becky Johns, 
Tonya McClung, Twila Dawson, 
Tina Ballas. 



Organizations/145 



Greeks 



(Cont.) 



GREG BISHOP helps entertain at a 
Greek party. 







INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL - Kip Captor, Greg Bishop, 
William Julian, adviser, Tom Weaver. 
Walker, Mark Queen Eber Deem, 



146/Organizations 




INTER-PANHELLENIC COUNCIL 
- FRONT ROW: Crystal Mick, 
Robyn Girondo, Elizabeth Craft, 



Crystal Wolfe, Susan Mitchell, 
Kathy Sciuga, BACK ROW: Eber 
Deem, David Harpold, Al Cassera, 



Randy Best, Tom Walker. 



Organizations/147 




Greeks 



(cont.) 



TERESA HARDMAN braves a cold 
and rainy homecoming parade. 








PHI MU - FRONT ROW: Sally 
Schmidle, Sandy Cavender, Tammi 
Tarr, Cindy Buchanan, Patricia 
Herrick, Elizabeth Craft, Elizabeth 
Davis; ROW 2: Susan Mitchell, 



Teresa Hardman, Ronda Heldreth, 
Beth Beavers, Deborah Cowger, 
Mary Basile, Sylvia Morrel, 
Melinda Taylor, Allyson 
Wightman; ROW 3: Patty Skinner, 



Karen Myers, Terri Sterling, Nancy 
Marzano, Shelley Lowe, Kimberly 
Cox, Jackie Alessandrini. ROW 4: 
Mara Hall, Barbara Wright, Donna 
Troy, Lynn Buckey, Martha 



Flesher, Kathleen Mraovich, Valerie 
Cacace. 



148/ Organizations 





j 



\ 






\, 



^ 



KEVIN WARCO and Mike Norris 
play racquetball for intramurals. 




SIGMA PI - FRONT ROW: Mike 
Elliott, adviser, Jeff Morris, Maury 
Allaire, Tom Walker, Mike 
Cutright, Dennis VanGilder, Robert 



Trickett, Robert Loy; ROW 2: Duke 
Mallow, Bill Suan, Dave 
Washburn, Brian Foland, Fred 



Tawney, J.B. Davis, Craig Colombo, 
Mike Williams; ROW 3: Mike Hill, 
Steve Vangilder, Steve Dodge, John 



Wells, Jerry Bennett, Emil Lehosit, 
Mark Elbon, Mike Wilson, Jack 
Bell. 



Organizations/149 



■-".' T"*. .,»--..-""<w--«L«.: 



Greeks 



(Cont. 




Xj? 



A RUNNING ENTHUSIAST gets 
his exercise at Rosier Field. 




SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA - FRONT 
ROW: Sharon Hibbs, Sandy Coe, 
Saundra Gorgonio, JoLynn White, 
Kathy Boyles, Ann Bush, Cindy 
Armstrong, Kathy Delaney, Jennifer 
Walker; ROW 2: Beth Allman, Janis 



Donley, Terri Schilling, Nancy 
Wiseman, Judy Stickler, Tammy 
Smith, Sharon Kerns, Lisa Painter, 
Natalie Price, Kelly Brown, Kim 
Summers; ROW 3: Debbie Clark, 
Charlotte Watsell, Robyn Girondo, 



Cindy Shields, Diane DeStefano, 
Tammy Knight, Allison Righter, 
Nadine Waslosky, Sue DeGeorge, 
Teresa McConnell; ROW 4: Julie 
Harlow, Penny Bullock, Patty 
Moss, Dixie VanDevander, Beth 



Mayhew, Beth McDermott, Lori 
Ossman, Charlene Wiseman, Leslie 
Hathaway; ROW 5: Marta Knight, 
Maria Lucente, Cindy Dotson, 
Diana Hanna, Carol Bean, DeeAnn 
Prozzillo. 



1507 Organizations 




Organizations/ 151 



CHERYL CARR bats a birdie to 
pass time during the rock-a-thon. 

STEVE BUTCHER goes for another 
box during the beer stacking contest 
held at one of the basketball games. 



(Cont.) 




TAU BETA IOTA - FRONT ROW: Heck, Bill Snyder; ROW 2: Roger Griffith; ROW 3; Tim Hall, Rick 
Gibbs Davidson, Michael Cupp, Jordan, Brad Lemon, Jay Pallotta, Everett, John Mace, Rich Pasqual; 
Kent Hartlieb, Mark Queen, Jim Greg Holden, Jeff Adams, Mark ROW 4; Mark Bowyer, Doug Pinn, 



Pete Bell, Randy Williams. 



152/Organizations 



mm 




REX CRITES, Craig Jarvis, Jim 
Collins head for classes after lunch in 
the cafeteria. 




TAU KAPPA EPSILON - FRONT 
ROW: Randy Best, Lou Allevato, 
Kip Cator, Al Cassera, Jay 
Messenger, Ken Hibbs, Dan 
Seccuro, Frank Pulice, Jr., adviser; 
Michael Geffrey, Scott Phillips, 
Brent Jarvis, Bruce Capp, Ed 
Morton, Frank Nicholas, Rod 



Lambert; ROW 2: Rob Tucker, Ken 
Schalmo, Shep Sheppard, Rex 
Crites, Courtney Harney, J.L. 
Greaser, Jim Collins, Sam Statler, 
Al Casini, Dave Ricer, Mike 
Haddix, Frank Zappa, Steve 
Johnson; ROW 3: Mike Goff, Ron 
Bacco, Steve Butcher, Tim Prickett, 



Mike Eddy, Jeff Bailey, Lee Bauber, 
Michael Kulji, Steve Gerasimovich, 
Jon Bailey, Mark Thompson, 
Anthony Gaudio, Rusty Staffileno; 
ROW 4: Jeffrey Hamrick, Jeffrey 
Coe, Kevin Meredith, Jeffrey 
Skeens, Lenny Marra, Jeffrey 
Hawkins, David Rich, Mark 



Watson, Bobby Fortney, Charlie 
Young, Dean Fragale, Fred Hannah; 
ROW 5: Porter Stiles, Gregory 
Elder, Jeffrey Henderson, Cliff 
Wilson, Allen Statler, Bob Tinnell, 
Craig Jarvis, Duane Heishman, 
Charlie Craven, Woody Flint. 



Organizations/ 153 



Greeks 



(cont.) 





THETA XI - FRONT ROW: Creed 
Holden, Larry Schmidle, Rodney 
Holbert, Mike Hanood, Fred Kerns, 
Greg Lilly, Randy Cross, Greg 
Bisohp, Mike Hall, John Orchard; 
ROW 2: Jim Ramono, Tim Rokisky, 
Sandy Belli, Lynn Heembach, Brent 
Skidmore; ROW 3: Jim Nemith, Al 
Moore, Rick Eakle, Jerry Mullins, 



Mike Morton, Steve Cuetnick, Jerry 
Kroeger, Dave Keffer; ROW 4: Bill 
Thayer, Bill Cooper, Butch Kemper, 
Rick Spaid, Tom Kopp, Dean 
Malone; ROW 5: Rick Morris, Bob 
Phillips, Carl Krzys, Randy Rader, 
Roger Weaver, Jeff Grubb, Larry 
Coltelli, Jeff Baker. 



154/Organizations 




JIM NEMITH climbs the hill for an 
afternoon class. 



WOMEN'S PANHELLENIC 
COUNCIL - FRONT ROW: 
Margaret Dailey, Linda Cogar, 
JoLynn White, Cindy Armstrong, 
Kathy Delaney, Cindy Buchanan; 
BACK ROW: Becky Clagett, Barb 
Oliverio, Sandy Cavender, Kathy 
Sciuga, Denise Spradling. 



Organizations/155 



Organizations 



BOB TINNELL scrapes the latest 
dumping of snow off of his car. 

AMERICAN CHEMICAL 
SOCIETY sponsored speakers from 
universities and major industries. 



AMERICAN CHEMICAL 
SOCIETY - FRONT ROW: Mary 
Angela Brugnoli, Karen Ollis, Jodi 
Neely, Maria Hite, Barbara Rumer, 
Martin Hite; BACK ROW: Dr. 
Elizabeth Swiger, adviser; Rod 
Shriver, Greg Tinnell, Kelly Bail, 
Erin Williams, Dr. James Coleman, 
adviser. 



AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR 
DRAFTING & DESIGN - FRONT 
ROW: Richard Forren, John 
Runner, Lynnette Yost, Tom 
Llanza; BACK ROW: Dr. Yuan Liu, 
adviser, Matthew Sciegaz, Darren 
Smith, Wesley Burnett, David 
Batson, adviser. 




156/Organizations 




THEATER STUDENTS search for 
gloves that properly match the 
costume. 



ARTISTS LIBERATION 
ORGANIZATION - Dan Barker, 
Katherine Colborn, Angie Domico, 
Karen Merrit, James Oliveto. 



BAPTIST CAMPUS MINISTRY - 
FRONT ROW: Charles Walters, 
Patty Moss, Frances Taylor; ROW 
2: Angela Oakes, Cheryl Given; 
ROW 3: Dan Morgan, Janice 
Morgan, Roger Morgan. 



Organizations/157 



Organizations 

(cont.) 

TWO DORM RESIDENTS relax 
after a day of classes. 

BLACK STUDENT UNION - 
FRONT ROW: Marcellis Lindsay, 
Beverly Bolland, Melanie Spencer, 
Denise Smith, Toni Parker; BACK 
ROW: Duane Bias, Leroy Loggins, 
Payton Flynn, Spanky Blake, 
George Holloway. 




CHAMBER SINGERS - FRONT 
ROW: Beverly Hitchcock, Linda 
Ollis, [ill Jamison, Debbie Booth, 
Bill Gorrell, Millie Fullerton, 
Debbie Bennett; ROW 2: Glafre 
Offutt, Donna McDowell, Jim 
Kessler, Dr. Alice Moerk, 
conductor; ROW 3: Bill Terry, Stan 
Masters, Skip Wilson, Duane 
Heishman. 




158/Organizations 






A STUDENT in the rock-a-thon 
spends some resting time on the 
floor. 

CHRISTIAN STUDENT UNION - 
FRONT ROW: Charles Whitlock, 
Charles Walters, Tina Marie 
Frisenda, Julie Adams, Connie 
Heaster, Frank Runion; BACK 
ROW: Bill Chicerelli, Cheryl Carr, 
Debbie Lucas, Kathy Smith, Leanne 
Yost, Judy Tennant, Caroline 
Toothman. 

COLLEGIATES - FRONT ROW: 
Barb Oliverio, Susan Elmer, Datha 
Ledbetter, Kathryn Shafferman, 
Olive Bowers, Jamie Stewart, 
Beverly Hitchcock, Mary Beto, 
Linda Ollis, Kathy Feather; ROW 2: 
Skip Wilson, Harry Adkins, Cathy 
Figler, Becky Grose, Betsey 
Coffman, Donna McDowell, Jimmy 
Martin, Cindy Parks, Debbie 
Poling, Renee Rhoades, Scott 
Marshall, Richard Fisher: ROW 3: 
Bill Gorrell, Laura Hanlon, Denise 
Spradling, Ron Copeland, George 
Greza, Dennis Pride, Leslie 
Carpenter, Keith Goldsberry, Mike 
Kelley, Jill Jamison, Leslie Nauman, 
Jim Jones. 



Organizations/159 



Organizations 

(Cont.) 

DELTA SIGMA RHO-TAU KAPPA 
ALPHA - FRONT ROW: John 
Overking, Brenda Gould, Thom 
Haller, Suzanne Snyder. 



ENGINEERING TECH- 
NOLOGICAL SOCIETY - FRONT 
ROW: Rick Marlowe, Dennis Pride, 
Irella Contraski, David Signorelli, 
Jim Jones, Sean Malone; ROW 2: 
Kevin Wood, Jeff Broschart, Craig 
Roscoe, Joe Cronin, Richard Forren; 
ROW 3: Scott Lambert, Mike 
Mazzie, Steven Triplett, Raymond 
Grose, Tim Parks, Dr. Lewis 
Herring, adviser. 




160/Organizations 




EVEN WITH COLD WINDS, 
students managed to smile. 




EPSILON PI TAU - FRONT ROW: 
Marvin Clouston, William Griscom, 
Terry Irwin; ROW 2: Scott Phillips, 
Walter Phillips, William 
Thompson; ROW 3: Robert Allman, 
Harold Santy, John Pheasant, Ken 
Kelly. 



Organizations/ 161 



Organizations 



(Cont. 



4-H CLUB - FRONT ROW: Nancy 
McVicker, Gail Wigal, Brenda 
Wolford, Gary Weaver, Denise 
Lough; BACK ROW: Jeff Ferree, 
Kelly Bail, Erin Williams, Teresa 
Heldreth, Susan Lively, Margaret 
Willard, adviser. 



FUTURE SECRETARIES CLUB - 
FRONT ROW: Julie Hadorn, Peggy 
Chenoweth, Beth Casto, Vicky 
Shears; BACK ROW: Dorothy 
Coffindaffer, adviser, Teresa 
Sheets, Carla Meredith, Sandy 
Ludwick, Dana Mullennex. 




162/ Organizations 




HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 
members display their annual 
stockings for newborn babies at 
Fairmont General Hospital. 




HPERS CLUB - FRONT ROW: 
Porter Stiles, Chris Jackson, Vicky 
Shears, Tim Belotte; ROW 2: Diane 
Hanna, Kim Knight, Kristi 
Williams, Cydney Atkins; ROW 3: 
Melissa Lamont, Mary Gerard, 
Scott Hernon, Sandy Stull. 



HOME ECONOMICS CLUB - 
FRONT ROW: Debby Daugherty, 
Linda Cogar, Nancy Manano, Olive 
Bowers, Teresa McConnell; ROW 2: 
Gina Ruggiero, Ann Calabrase, 
Bonnie Bolt, Dottie Gallimore, 
Valerie Cacace; ROW 3: Cathy 
Greenleaf, Kaye Bartrug, Gail 
Wigal, Lynn Buckey, Tammie 
Brown. 



Organizations/163 



r 




IRC MEMBERS attend a reception 
for new foreign students. 



Organizations 

(cont.) 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 
CLUB - FRONT ROW: Bahman 
Behzadi, Hamid Behzadi, Masood 
Tabibian, Edward Helewa, Gordon 
Sadala, Charles Wugate; ROW 2: 
julieh Liu, Gary Birdsell, Debra 
Wyckoff, Norma Gantz, Siavash 
Rahuar, Paiboon Tangyunyong, Dr. 
Patricia Ryan, adviser; ROW 3: 
Peggy Chenowith, Sherry Bennett, 
Thom Haller, Sandy Goldsmith, 
John Cook, Simon Su, Beverly 
Hitchcock, Muna Zabaneh; ROW 4: 
Pierre Lord, Luc Tousignant, 
William Phillips, faculty; Frederick 
Shaupp, faculty; Michael Fulda, 
faculty; Parvaneh Arasteh, Grace 
Helewa. 

INTER-VARSITY - Diane Adrian, 
Jennifer Smith, Patty Moss, Connie 
Heaster, Margaret Willard, adviser; 
Charles Walters. 



164/Organizations 





KAPPA DELTA PI - FRONT 
ROW: Carleen Worstell, Beth 
Haught, Rebecca Seckman, Lisa 
Painter, Pam Kaufman; ROW 2: 
Ronda McDaniel, Pam Bolyard, 
Kelly Kent, Emily Robinson; ROW 
3: Vicki Butcher, Dottie Gallimore, 
Patty Donham, Paula Rossi, 
Margaret Willard, adviser. 







MARCHING BAND - FRONT 
ROW: Tammy McGee, Terry Barr, 
Robyn Girondo, Tracy Barr, 
Tammy Booth, Jackie Cline, Bill 
Gorrell; ROW 2: Connie Gordon, 
Susan Decker, Denise Lopez, Penny 
Riser, Denise Gower, Betty Walker, 
Millie Fullerton, Barbara Oliverio; 
ROW 3: Linda Elmer, Denise 
Bennett, Susan Elmer, Denise 



Spradling, George Greza, Denise 
Lough, Mary Beto, Sharon Garcia; 
ROW 4: Debbie Bennett, Garry 
Bourne, Keith Goldsberry, Kevin 
Shuman, Richard Fisher, Stanley 
Masters, Rick Post, Susan 
Shafferman ROW 5: Nyla Keener, 
Robert Hunt, Mike Lopez, Bill 
Terry, Vinton Wright, Dave Evans, 
Melanie Marsh, Patrick Daugherty; 



ROW 6: Kathy Feather, Ron 
Copeland, Mike Hyman, Brian 
Flannigan, Eber Deem, Betsy 
Coffman, Brenda Hunter, Scott 
Marshall; ROW 7: Chris Boyce, 
John Placha, Mark Refosco, Mike 
Kelly, Donna McDowell, Danny 
Toothman, Frank Runion. 



Organizations/165 



TOM BARTON takes off make up 
applied during make up class. 

Organizations 

(cont.) 



MASQUERS - FRONT ROW: 
Cathy O'Dell, Steve Jones, Damon 
Riley, Sharon Fields, John 
Hofbauer, Mary Bell, Mark Smith, 
Debbie Booth; ROW 2: Pat Hill, 
Tom Barton, Shelly Vilar, Debbie 
Grogg, Kendra Stingo, Tom Stevick, 
Gina Ruggiero; ROW 3: B.J. 
Sherman, adviser; Darlene Brown, 
John Retton, Chris Fazio, Don 
Reed, Chester Harris, Jo Ann 
Lough, adviser. 



MEDICAL LABORATORY 
TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATION - 
FRONT ROW: Tammy Eddy, Diane 
DeBolt, Lisa Jarvis, Lisa Bish, Pam 
Hamric Cottrill, Belinda Straight; 
Donna Blankenship, Steve Simon, 
Michelle Anderson, Jeannie 
Wyckoff Kelly, Caryl Linger, Randy 
Darrah. 




166/Organizations 




MEDICAL LABORATORY 
TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATION - 
FRONT ROW: Anita Jacques Kolar, 
Rhonda Thomas, Debbie Bland, 
Vanessa Earnest, Arnetta Linch, 
Barbara Davis, Dawn Parrish; 
BACK ROW: Paul O'Brien, Teri 
Clement, Margaret Bradshaw, Beth 
Anderson, Donna Guseman, Chris 
Taylor, Anne Stewart, Tonya 
Radcliff. 




MEN'S INTRAMURAL STAFF - 
FRONT ROW: Chip McCutcheon, 
Roger Weaver, Lynn Heimbeck, 
Rex Crites, Carl Lenoir. BACK: Bill 



Zacott, Brian Bradley, Roger 
Jordan, Scott Gossard, Randy 
Cross, Barry Taylor. 



Organizations/167 



Organizations 



(Cont. 



MEN'S INSTRAMURAL STAFF - 
FRONT ROW: Bill Zacot, Ron 
Whiting, Jay Messenger, Bucky 
Davis, Roger Sofdan; BACK ROW: 
Dennis Harpold, Bob Loy, Bill 
Keeler, Mike Hanood, Brian 
Bradley. 



MUSIC EDUCATORS NATIONAL 
CONFERENCE - FRONT ROW: 
Jamie Stewart, Bill Gorrell, Betty 
Walker, Skip Wilson, Brenda 
Hunter, Michael Kelley: ROW 2: 
Frances Moody, adviser; Ron 
Copeland, Linda Ollis, Marcella 
Fineran, Jill Jamison, Lea Ann 
Gerkin; ROW 3: Dr. Harry Faulk, 
adviser; John Placha, Brian 
Flanagan, Scott Marshall. 




168/Organizations 




STEVE JONES AND JOHN 
RETTON receive instruction from 
Erik Fredricksen, FSC alumnus, 
who is a Broadway actor and stage 
combat expert. 



PI ALPHA THETA - FRONT 
ROW: Mari Hunt, Richard 
Wardian, faculty; Kim Horner, 
David Myers, David Jasper, Clifton 
Price; BACK ROW: Steve Gatrell, 
faculty; Joanne Van Horn, faculty, 
T.W. Bragg, Ginny Copley, Anna 
Marie Flamini, Pam Bolyard. 



PI GAMMA MU - FRONT ROW: 
Richard Wardian, faculty; Kim 
Horner, Mary Martin, Sandy 
Goldsmith, Steve Gatrell, faculty; 
BACK ROW: Clifton Price, Joanne 
Van Horn, faculty; T.W. Bragg, 
Sherry Bennett, Thorn Haller, Pam 
Bolyard. 



Organizations/169 



MARGARET WILLARD serves 
Rev. Richard Bowyer during "Cook 
and Taste". 



Organizations 



(cont. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 
ASSOCIATION - FRONT ROW: 
George Shelhammer, Bill Dye, 
Thom Haller; ROW 2: Brad 
Fulayter, Pam Tuttle, Joyce Walker, 
Norma Gantz; ROW 3: Belinda 
West, Dr. Robert Reinhardt, 
adviser; Dr. Patricia Ryan, adviser; 
Carol Hatfield. 



SIGMA ALPHA IOTA - FRONT 
ROW: Brenda Shirkey, Melanie 
Marsh, Jamie Stewart; ROW 2: 
Becky Kessler, Helen Luzapone, 
Brenda Hunter, Dr. Alice Moerk, 
adviser; ROW 3: Linda Ollis, 
Donna McDowell, Nyla Keener, 
Debbie Bennett. 




1707 Organizations 




SIGMA TAU DELTA - Mari Hunt, 
Rhonda Sturm, Dr. George Byers, 
adviser. 




ij 



SOCIETY FOR COLLEGIATE 
JOURNALISTS - Rose Heston, 
Barb Oliverio, Linda Elmer, Liz 
Stewart. 




STAGE BAND - FRONT ROW: Dale Kittle; ROW 2: Jeff Broschart, Copeland; ROW 3: Donna Hess, Chris Boyce, Marcella 
Terry Jones, Danny Toothman, Mark Refosco, Vinton Wright, Bill McDowell, Nyla Keener, Garry Fineran, Lea Ann Gerkin. 
Karen Drummond, Mike Lopez, Terry, Stanley Masters, Ron Bourne, Brenda Shirkey, Scott 



Organizations/171 



STUDENT BODY PRESIDENT Jim 
Scott asks questions of Board of 
Regents representatives during a 
meeting. 



Organizations 



(cont. 



STUDENT EDUCATION 
ASSOCIATION - FRONT ROW: 
Emily Robinson, Marlene Holbert, 
Robyn Girondo, Kathy Boyles, 
Margaret Willard, adviser; Ann 
Bush, Carleen Worstell, Rebecca 
Seckman; ROW 2: Valjean Haught, 
Carol Ashcraft, Sandy Davis, Kelly 
Kent, Vicki Morris, Lisa Painter, 
Dottie Gallimore; ROW 3: Beth 
Haught, Ronda McDaniel, Connie 
Heaster, Charles Walters, Marion 
King, Pam Bolyard, Patty Donham, 
Chriss Gouzd. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT - 
FRONT ROW: Wadie Blanks, 
Denise Taylor, Kathy Beale, Jim 
Scott, Richard Donko; ROW 2: 
Frank Audia, Bob Massullo, Brenda 
Gould, Mark Robison, Danette 
Hardman; ROW 3: Sherry Bennett, 
Sandy Goldsmith, Delia Bunner, 
Greg Tinnell, Toni Parker, 




172/Organizations 




STUDENT NURSES - FRONT 
ROW: Kay Can, Nadine Waslosky, 
Suzanne Williams; ROW 2: 
Kathleen Conley, Lori DeFebbo, 
Peggy Stemple; ROW 3: Virginia 
Santeufemia, Barbara Gorley, 
Debra Harley; ROW 4: Kathy 
Sisler, Billie Fabre, Lisa Toothman; 
ROW 5: Helen Brown, Deborah 
Gallaher, Eric Willis, Diane Edge. 




STUDENT PUBLICATIONS - 
FRONT ROW: Randy Shillingburg, 
Pam Shillingburg, Barb Oliverio, 
Scott Kayser, Linda Elmer; ROW 2: 
Jim Bissett, Rhonda Sturm, Rose 
Heston, Elizabeth Stewart, Lea Ann 
Yost; ROW 3: Cathy Figler, Josie 
Plachta, Susi Cross, Denise Gower, 
Mike Edmond, Frank Runion. 



Organizations/173 




SOCIAL WORK CLUB - FRONT 
ROW: Linda Ropp, Mary Beth 
Quinn, Abby Glover, Kathy Sciuga, 
Pam Tuttle. Kim Brown; BACK 
ROW: Kathy Anderson, Tammy 
Michels, Nancy Casagranda, Robin 
Straight, Lila Bassett, Kathy 
Murphy. 

Organizations 

(cont.) 



WESLEY FOUNDATION - David 
Jasper, Jean Williams, Robin 
Woody, Richard Bowyer, adviser; 
Marsha Hudson. 




174/Organizations 




JOSIE PLACHTA, tries chop sticks 
at a local Chinese restaurant. 



WOMEN'S INTRAMURAL STAFF 
- FRONT ROW: Patty Moss, Ruth 
Kelby, Debbie Ayers, Vicky Shears; 
BACK ROW: Debbie Cooper, Kim 
Brown, Debbie Cowger, Mary 
Saville. 



Organizations/175 



JEFF ADAMS, Fairmont, 

Business Administration 

BETH ALLMAN, Jane Lew, 

Radio-TV Communications 

NANCY ALLMAN, Clarksburg, 

Elementary Education 




Notable assistant 



So who records grades for 
all those lab experience 
sheets in Music Appreci- 
ation? 

Meet Debbie Bennett, a 
sophomore from Grafton, 
who works as an assistant 
to Dr. Alice Moerk. Debbie 
works through Regular Stu- 
dent Employment (RSE), an 
on-campus employment for 
students showing no finan- 
cial need. 

The music major must 
keep records of Music 205 
and 206 quiz grades and 
L.E. sheets and lab attend- 
ance. Debbie also prepares 
materials and does research 
for special programs. 



Receiving excellent train- 
ing for teacher education, 
Debbie has been an assist- 
ant for two semesters and 
hopes to work again next 
year. 

Six hours a week some- 
times turns out to be longer 
for her. Does it interfere 
with schoolwork? "It's part 
of my schoolwork." 

One of themost valuable 
experiences is working and 
meeting the students. "You 
learn to be tactful with the 
students. They will stop you 
on campus and ask about 
their grade." 




KATHY ANDERSON, 

Clarksburg, Social Work 

MARY MICHELE ANDERSON, 

Washington, Medical 

Laboratory Technology 

PARVANEH ARASTEH, 

Fairmont, Health Science 

ROXANN AUTERI, Follansbee, 

Nursing 



DAN BARKER 

KATHY BEALE, New 

Martinsville, Business 

Administration 

ROBIN JOY BENNETT, 

Buckhannon, Physical 

Education 

SHERRY BENNETT, Elkins, 

Psychology 




176/Class of '80 




DARLENE BERKE, Leviltown, 
Pa, Business Administration 
SHARLA BERRY, Paden City, 
Medical Records Technician 
GARY LEE BIRDSELL, 
Fairmont, Business 
Administration 

WADIE BLANKS, Mobile, Ala., 
Business 



CAROL BLATT, Paden City, 

Elementary Education 

CATHERINE BOGGS, Sutton, 

Nursing 

JOE BOLIAN/Fairmont, 

General Science 

PAM BOLYARD, Thornton, 

Mathematics 



TROI BROWN, Columbus, 

Ohio, Radio-TV 

Communications 

SUSIE BRUNER, Grafton, 

Elemetary Education 

LYNN BUCKLEY, Pittsburgh, 

Pa, Home Economics 

DELLA BUNNER, Fairmont, 

Psychology 



ELIZABETH ANN BUSH, 

Clarksburg, Elementary 

Education 

CYNTHIA CAIN 

CAROL CAMPBELL, 

Morgantown, Business 

Education 

NANCY CASAGRANDA, 

Cumberland, Social Work 



New 



ALFRED J. CASSERA, JR., 

Wayne, N.J., Business 

Administration 

BETH E. CASTO, French Creek, 

Executive Secretarial 

NANCY M. CAYTON, 

Fairmont, Journalism 

PEGGY CHENOWETH, Elkins, 

Office Administration 



Class of '80/177 



JO ANN CHIPPS, Fairmont, 

Accounting 

REBECCA L. CLAGETT, 

Fairmont, Business 

Administration 



PATRICIA CLELLAND 

MARCY CODO, Romney, 

Nursing 



LINDA COGAR, Buckhannon, 

Home Economics 

PEGGY A. COLEBANK, 

Grafton, Elementary Education 



VICKIE A. COLLINS, 

Farmington, Business 

Administration 

MARIE JANE COLOMBO, 

Fairmont 



SABRINA WARNER 

CONNELL, Buckhannon, 

Elementary Education 

CYNTHIA CONWAY, Elkins, 

Social Work 





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Day brightener 

To obtain many of the two and four 
year degrees at Fairmont State Col- 
lege, students must participate in a 
practicum which prepares them for 
the field they have chosen. 

Sheila Moore, a junior psychology 
major, is completing her psychology 
practicum as a worker at Wishing 
Well Nursing Home. She visits her 16 
regular patients two afternoons a 
week. These are elderly, disabled, or 
chronically ill people who tell her any 
of their problems. 

"Sometimes these people get very 
lonely and they need someone who 
will take time to listen to them. They 
don't always talk about the problems 
they have; many of them are content. 
Many times they want to talk about 
things they have done in the past." 

She also completed an experiment 
while working at Wishing Well. Her 
hypothesis was "Does encouraging el- 
derly people to talk about their past 
stimulate learning?" 

First she evaluated 20 patients at 
random and asked them general ques- 
tions such as today's date, their birth- 
day, and the name of the president of 
the United States. 

She split them into two groups and 
gave them "memory therapy," which 
is five sessions where they were en- 
couraged to talk about their past. 

Assisting with the activities planned 
is also a part of her duties. The 
patients have birthday parties, view 
movies from the FSC library, bowl, 
and go shopping. 

"It makes me feel good to brighten a 
lonely person's day," she said. 



178/Class of '80 




GINNY COPLEY, Bridgeport, 
Social Studies Comprehensive 
CANDACE K. CORL, 
Carmichaels, Pa., Business 
Administration 
DAVID CORSINI, Clarksburg, 
Business Administration 
DAVID D. CRITES, Clendenin, 
Business Administration 



DURANNE P. DANA, Weston, 

Sociology 

DEBBY DAUGHERTY, Kasson, 

Home Economics 

ELIZABETH S. DAVIS, 

Clarksburg, Food Service 

Management 

SANDY L. DAVIS, Greensboro, 

Pa., Home Economics 



JOYCE DEHNER, Clarksburg, 

Elementary Education 

MARY DELOVICH, Monongah, 

Elementary Education 

WENDY ANN DOE, 

Charlottesville, Va., Commercial 

Design-Graphics 

PAULA DOLOG, Rivesville, 

Elementary Education 



PATTY DONHAM, Grafton, 
Elementary Education 
JAN EDWARDS, Kingmont, 
Business Education 
BETTY J. ELLIFRITT, 
Clarksburg, Elementary 
Education 

SUSAN ELMER, Jane Lew, 
Elementary Education 



DEBRA S. FANTO, Keyser, 

Elementary Education 

BRENDA FARLEY, Coolridge, 

Vet Assistance 

BETH FRALEY, Wierton, 

Nursing 

MICHAEL ALLEN FRONTINO, 

Summersville, Business 

Administration 



Class of '80/179 



KAREN FRY, Fairmont, 

Elementary Education 

DOTTIE GALLIMORE, Iaeger, 

Home Economics 

MARY E. GERRARD, 

Charleston, Health Science 

PAM GIULIANI, Arthurdale, 

Medical Secretarial 



KELLY GOLDEN, Buckhannon, 
Clerical 
SANDRA GOLDSMITH, 
Charlestown, Account- 
ing/Political Science 
MARY GREELY, Fairmont, 
Elementary Education 
REBECCA J. GREENLEAF, 
Buckhannon, Criminal Justice 



GEORGE GREZA, Bruceton 

Mills, Music 

ROGER HALLER 

THOM HALLER, Weston, 

Political Science 

HOBIE HARRIS, St. Marys, 

Civil Engineering 



CHARLENE HART, Bridgeport, 

Elementary Education 

JUDY HAHN, Kingwood, 

English 

VALJEAN HAUGHT, 

Farmington, Elementary 

ROSE HESTON, Fairmont, 

Business Administration 



KIMBERLY HORNER, 

Mannington, Accounting 

MARI K. HUNT, Sistersville, 

English 

TERRY R. IRWIN, Groton, 

Conn. Civil Engineering 

DAVID E. JASPER, Oak Hill, 

Elementary Education 




180/ Class of 80 




DEBBIE JONES, Philippi, 
Elementary Education 
LEE ANNE KARLEN, 
Buckhannon, Graphic 
Arts/Commercial Design 
PAMELA SUE KAUFMAN, 
Bluefield, Elementary Education 




A trip to Fantasy Island 



Travelling all the way 
across the continent to the 
Pacific Ocean to the tiny is- 
land of Catalina, Kim 
Thome, senior commu- 
nications major from Riv- 
esville, spent the month of 
August at the John David- 
son Singer's Summer Camp. 

Chosen to attend through 
audition tapes and a re- 
sume, Kim received instruc- 
tion regarding performance, 
make-up, choreography and 
other aspects of profes- 
sional music from John Da- 
vidson. 



Kim felt the most impor- 
tant concept she learned 
was "confidence — to say to 
yourself 'I can do this . . . 
this is what I want to do 
and I'm going to do the best 
I can.' " 

She now sings locally 
with the rock band "Touch" 
and later plans to become a 
singer on a full-scale profes- 
sional level. Although the 
tuition and airfare for the 
camp were a bit expensive, 
Kim Thorne feels it was 
worth every penny. 




SCOTT KAYSER, Pt Pleasant, 

Speech 

KELLY J. KENT, Mannington, 

Business Education 

CHERYL KINCELL, Fairmont, 

Nursing 

TAMALA S. KIRBY, Fairmont, 

Business Administration 



KENNY KOAY, Fairmont, 

Accounting 

LINDA KRUGER, Wellsburg, 

Elementary Education 

JO ANN KUTZ, Wellsburg, 

Business Education 

TINA LAYMAN, Fairmont, 

Respiratory Therapy 



Class of '80/181 



BRENDA LEISHMAN, 

Kingswood, Psychology 

BRENDA LOAR, Grafton, 

Drafting 



MARK LOSH, Bridgeport 

ARTHUR D. LOY II, Benwood, 

Commercial Design 



GREGORY P. LYNCH, 

Wheaton, Md. Industrial Arts 

JO ANN LYONS, Newburg, 

Clerical 



LISA MALONE, Grafton, 

Nursing 

TINA MARIE MANZO, 

Monongah, Computer Science 



DIANA MARSH, Webster 

Springs, Elementary Education 

MELANIE MARSH, 

Worthington, Music Education 




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A busy lady 

Tammy Michels took two years of 
general studies before deciding that 
social work was where her ambitions 
lie. 

The junior social work major is a 
veteran of a two-month field place- 
ment as an intermittent interviewer. 
The job entails fitting people to the 
right job. 

"Some people have a hard time 
with job placement. My job is to find 
them a job that fits their temperament 
and ability. This job gave me a real 
life look at what I would be doing 
after I graduate. Dealing with each 
individual and their special problems 
presented a continuous challenge that 
taught me to use at my job what I had 
learned as a student." Tammy said. 

Another field placement she is par- 
ticipating in is RISE, Reinforcing Inde- 
pendence through Systematic Educa- 
tion. This is a partial care program 
presented by Valley Community Men- 
tal Health Center to mentally handi- 
capped individuals. 

RISE is designed to aid devel- 
opment of skills such as personal hy- 
giene, grocery shopping, housekeeping 
skills, and monitoring their medicine. 
She also teaches a reading learning 
station on a one-to-one basis at Valley. 

"It's hard to realize what lies ahead 
once I complete college, but my job 
experience has broadened my views 
of social work. It has helped me pre- 
pare for what is expected of me from 
a job," she said. "I also learned that 
most mentally retarded people can 
function in society with the aid of 
these teaching programs." 



182/Class of '80 




MARY MARTIN, Fairmont, 

Business 

ROBERT MASSULLO, 

Morgantown, Elementary 

Education 

MARY LISA MASTON, St. 

Marys, Medical Secretarial 

DEBORAH K. MC CARDLE, 

Littleton, Retail Management 



THOMAS MCINTIRE, 
Worthington, Business 
SUSIE MEADOWS, Charleston, 
Business Administration 
KATHERINE R. MEDINA, 
Clarksburg, Accounting 
CAROL ANN MICHAEL, 
Petersburg, Respiratory Therapy 



CORA MICK, Buckhannon, 

Business Education 

CONNIE MILLER, St. Albans, 

Home Economics 

FOREST C. MILLER III, Reader, 

Technology 

VAUGHN R. MILLER, Albright, 

Mining Technology 



GENEVIEVE R. MITCHELL, 

Kasson, Commercial 

Design/Graphics 

PAM MOATS 

DONNA MONTELEONE 

EDWARD MORGAN 



PHIL L. MORRIS, Weirton, 
Civil Engineering Technology 
DANA L. MULLENNEX, 
Parsons, Medical Secretary 
PATRICIA A. MULLENAX, 
Whitmer, Special Education 
NANCY NORTON MYERS, 
Clarksburg, Sociology 



Class of '80/183 



SALLY L. MYERS, Clarksburg, 

Psychology, Business 

MIKENORRIS 

BARBARA OLIVERIO, 

Carolina, Mathematics 

LUIS ORTEZA, Morgantown, 

Psychology 



LISA PAINTER 

STEVE PANCAKE, Romney, 

Business 

JOHN PASQUALE III, 

Fairmont, Business 

Administration 

JAMS PATTERSON, 

Charlestown, Elementary 

Education 




You plus tutor equals 
learning mathematics 



Many students lost in the 
depths of functions and po- 
lynomials have found a 
helping hand from Pam 
Bolyard, one of the Math 
Department tutors. 

A senior math education 
major from Grafton, Pam 
was selected to work as a 
tutor by Dr. James Larue, 
Coordinator of Mathemat- 
ics. As many as five hours 
per week she has guided 



students back onto the right 
track in pre-calculus, as 
well as calculus courses. 

Pam feels a strong advan- 
tage of tutoring is "in ex- 
plaining a concept. It helps 
the student by backing up 
the understanding of that 
concept." 

Above all, she considers 
it an enjoyable experience 
that certainly has prepared 
her for her career. 




JAY PELLILLO, Monongah 

COREY POTTER, Martins 

Ferry, Ohio, Nursing 

DAVID PROUDFOOT, 

Fairmont, Industrial Arts 




184/Class of '80 




GENNY RAIKES, Fairmont, 
Radio & TV Communication 
MARK REDCLIFFE 
TAMA REXRODE, Fairmont, 
Elementary Education 
TINA RICE, Fairmont 



CHRISTINE RICHARDS, Wolf 
Summit, Physical Education 
EMILY ROBINSON, 
Middlebourne, Elementary 
Education 

VIRGINIA ROBINSON, 
Fairmont, Home Economics 
PAULA ROSSI, Monongah, 
Home Economics 



JOHN M. RUNNER, Bridgeport, 

Engineering Technology 

LAURA RUSSELL, Fairmont, 

Law Enforcement 

JIM SCOTT, Weston, Political 

Science 

PAMELA SHILLINGBURG, 

Fairmont, English 



BRENDA K. SHIRKEY, 

Bridgeport, Music Education 

BARBARA ANNE SINGLEY, 

Charleston, Radio & TV 

Broadcasting 

SANDRA SINSEL, Bridgeport, 

Social Science 

KATHY SISLER, Terra Alia, 

Nursing 



JAMIE SMITH, Elkview, 
Nursing 

JENNIFER SMITH, Grafton, 
Elementary Education 
CHERYL R. SNODGRASS, 
Harrisville, Respiratory Therapy 
DENISE M. SPRADLING, 
Salem, Va., Elementary 
Education 



Class of '80/185 



PEGGY L. STEMPLE, Aurora, 

Nursing 

PORTER STILES 

JOYCE ANN STOUT, Lost 

Creek, Veterinary Assistant 

Technology 

BELINDA STRAIGHT 



RHONDA STURM, Metz, 

English 

DENISE TAYLOR, Fairmont, 

Social Work 

FRANCIS L. TAYLOR, St. 

Albans, Accounting 

SUSAN TERRY, Mannington, 

Clerical Secretary 



MARK THOMPSON, Fairmont, 

Radio & TV Communications 

LISA TIANO, Fairmont, Health 

Science 

MARY ANN TOKARZ, 

Rivesville, Business Principles 

PAM TUTTLE, Pentress, Social 

Work 



VICKY UTT 

PAMELA K. VIANDS, 

Fairmont, Nursing 

LANCE BYRON WAGNER, 

Rivesville, Economics 

JUDY WALKER 



JEANIE WAMSLEY, Elkins, 

Special Education 

CHERYL WARD, Lost Creek, 

Elementary Education 

JUNE ELLEN WARNER, 

Buckhannon, Retail 

Management 

DEBRA D. WATKINS, Wallace, 

Elementary Education 




186/Class of 80 




Red-shirted but 
not forgotten 

In the '78-79 basketball season, 
there was a player referred to as the 
squad's inspirational leader. That 
player was Manny Jones, sophomore 
from Chesapeake. 

Manny, again, in the '79-'80 season 
can be referred to as the squad's in- 
spirational leader. However, this sea- 
son the circumstances are different. 

Manny was "red-shirted" from the 
basketball team. Being red-shirted did 
not stop Manny from wanting to play 
basketball. He still practices with the 
team even though he cannot be an 
active member. 

When asked if he has ever thought 
about quitting, Jones replied, "No, I'll 
never quit because I have wanted to 
play basketball for Fairmont State 
ever since eleventh grade." 

The squad's inspirational leader 
goes to all the games and gives his 
support and enthusiasm to the players 
that are playing. "I always had a lot of 
spirit," said Manny. 

Manny played in 16 games his fresh- 
man year and plans to play again next 
year. 




CHRISTINA WATSON, 
Wileyville, Chemistry 
KAREN DARLENE WELLS, 
Fairmont, Nursing 



JO LYNN WHITE, Sisterville, 
Business Administration 
PATRICIA R. WILLIAMS, 
Bridgeport, Accounting 



SUZANNE M. WILLIAMS, 
Tunnelton, Nursing 
TONI WILSON, Bethesda, MD, 
Clerical Secretary 



CRYSTAL WOLFE, 
Barrackville, Clerical Secretary 
CARLEEN LANAY 
WORSTELL, St. Marys, 
Elementary Education 



DEBRA L. WYCKOFF, 
Wellington, Social Studies 
NANCY YEAGER, Fairmont, 
Elementary Education 



Class of '80/187 




Dorm Resident Assistant likes 
basketball and keeping busy 



"I like to meet people and 
study their behavior," says 
Dottie Gallimore, a senior 
secondary education major 
from Iaeger. 

Dottie is a Resident As- 
sistant (RA) at Morrow Hall 
and has worked as an RA 
for three years. This year, 
Dottie works on a floor in 
which 19 out of 22 girls are 
freshmen. "I like working 
with these girls because 
they are freshmen and it 
gives me a chance to help 
them with a lot of their 
problems," says Dottie. She 
really enjoys meeting 
people and likes working as 
an RA. 

Being an RA is not the 
only thing that Dottie does 
on campus. She also keeps 
score for the women's bas- 



ketball team. "I knew the 
girl who did it my freshman 
year. When she left, I went 
to the coach, explained I 
knew how to keep the 
books, and asked if I would 
be allowed." 

If that does not seem to 
keep Dottie busy enough, 
then she will find something 
else to do. That something 
else is working as a secre- 
tary to Jim Scott and his 
work on the Board of Re- 
gents. 

Dottie is in the Block this 
semester, but says that it 
does not make the work 
seem harder. 

"The best part of the job 
is getting to know the girls 
on my floor and meeting 
people." 



Diana Abel 

Harry Adkins 

Roger Anglin 

Cathy Arbogast 

Susan Armendariz 

Gina Ash craft 



Jeff Bailey 

Kaye Bartrug 

Donna Basile 

Carol Bean 

Denise Bennett 

Karen Bennington 



Krystal Berry 

Deborah Booth 

Tammy Booth 

Chris Boyce 

Julie Boyce 

Margie Bradshaw 



Alice Braham 
Kathryn Brasher 

Becky Brown 
Christina Brown 

David Brown 
Kimberly Brown 




188/Classof '81 




Sharon Brown 
Rodney Brunfield 
oseph Buda 
Kathryn Byles 
Kip Captor 
Cheryl Can- 



Cathy Chapman 
Lisa Chapman 
Kathy Christafore 
Terri Cheslock 
Debra Clark 
Cathy Coffman 



Irella Contraski 
Pam Costion 
Jackie Cox 
Elizabeth Craft 
Susi Cross 
Mary Cummings 



Becky Cupp 
Lori Defebbo 
Betty DeMary 
Kathy Detwyler 
Lisa Dobbins 
Jenny Eakin 



Kristina Earley 
Terry Efaw 
Cheryle Elbon 
Linda Elmer 
Sharon Fields 
Anna Flamini 



KEITH GOLDSBERRY and a friend enjoy a 
dance at the Homecoming disco. 



Class of '81/189 



Louise Fromhart 
Steven Fulayter 
Debbie Gallaher 



Tami Fugater 

Lisa Gearde 

Robyn Girondo 



Barbara Gorby 

Bill Gorrell 

Christine Gouzd 



Stephine Green 

Catherine Greenleaf 

Debra Grogg 



Pamela Gwinn 

Jan Haines 

Valerie Hall 



Diane Hanna 

Chester Harris 

Ramona Held 



Paula Henderson 

Darlene Herndon 

Pattie Herrick 



Janet Hines 

Karen Hockman 

Vicki Hughes 



Gina Hutton 

Ted Insco 

Kathryn Johnson 









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cann ? 



Who 
Anthony Cann! 

If you're ever down by the athletic 
locker rooms in the Feaster Center 
and hear a few "ouches" and "oohs" 
and a lot of "Anthony! Hey, where's 
Anthony?" then you'll know you're 
near the training room. 

Who's Anthony? Why he's Anthony 
Cann, the FSC trainer and that's not 
all. 

Anthony is a certified Emergency 
Medical Technologist who served as 
trainer three years ago and returned to 
the post last fall. 

"I enjoy it a lot. I've been around 
athletes — I played sports. Now that 
I'm old and can't play, I found a way 
to be around it." 

Old, indeed, the 29 year-old trainer 
is also a senior biology major who is 
currently carrying 17 hours and does 
his studying between ankle wraps and 
pulled muscles. 

During football season, he worked 
from 12 to 6:30 p.m. every day and 
three hours on Sundays. 

"The hours will go down in basket- 
ball season," said Anthony, "but there 
are more games." 

The hours may go down in basket- 
ball season, but they don't decrease 
for Anthony who puts in 14 hours a 
week as a part-time cook at a nearby 
restaurant. 

Something about sprained ankles, 
broken bones, and bruised ribs must 
appeal to him because he plans to 
continue his education at West Vir- 
ginia University to become a certified 
athletic trainer. 



190/Class of '81 




James Jones 
Melanie Kanios 
Sharon Kennedy 
Paula Kerns 
Marion King 
Donna Knotts 



Scott Lambert 
Libbie Lanfried 
Carol Langmaack 
Tami Lantz 
Linda Lemasters 
Charla Lester 



Marjorie Liebau 
Arnetta Linch 
Leslie Linn 
Michael Lopez 
Denise Lough 
Charlene Martin 



Libby Mayle 
Tamala McGee 
Kimi McGreevy 
Renee McKibben 
Karl Miller 
Allen Mitchell 



Todd Moore 
Judy Moran 
Sara Moreland 
Roger Morgon 
Michele Morris 
Linda Mullins 



PAM SHILLINGBURG 
sits in an LRC display 
case in observance of 
"Be With A Book For 
A Day." 



Class of '81/191 



The FSC FALCON BAND 
marches through the drizzling 
rain during the Homecoming 
parade. 




Shari Murchland 

Nannette Oliverio 

Kimberly Palmer 

Dawn Parrish 

Carl Phillips 

Angeli Pope 



Beverly Powell 

Kimberly Prickett 

Tim Prickett 

Mary Quinn 

Tonya Radcliff 

Scott Rebrook 



Julie Reed 

Kim Rose 

Melanie Rowand 

Virginia Santeufemia 

Stephanie Sayre 

Peggy Selvey 



Larry Shideler 

Randy Shillingburg 

Tracy Simpson 

Billie Smith 

Deborah Soles 

Rick Spa id 



Lisa Spencer 

Judy Sponangle 

Sharon Sprigg 

Mary Sprouse 

Darcy Steed 

Kathy Stevens 



192/Class of '81 




Establishing contact 
is key for Julie Douglas 



"The most important 
thing is to have contact 
with the kids," says Julie 
Douglas a senior Social 
Work major from St. Marys. 

The "kids" that Julie has 
contact with are mentally 
retarded. 

Julie does volunteer work 
at the Colin Anderson Cen- 
ter in St. Marys in the win- 
ter and the summer. 

In the winter her job is 
mostly custodial care, 
which could involve such 
things as mopping floors to 
changing diapers. Julie can- 
not put a lot of time in dur- 
ing the winter because she 
has to attend school, but 
she volunteers during holi- 
days. "Sometimes when the 
weather is bad and people 
cannot get to work I go and 
help out," said Julie. During 

the summer months Julie 



works as a camp attendant. 
The Center sponsors a camp 
for the children where she 
works and supervises a 
group of around 10 chil- 
dren. This camp lasts for 
three days and two nights. 
Then Julie receives two to 
three days off then goes 
back to work at the camp 
with another group of chil- 
dren. 

Children that Julie works 
with are all mentally re- 
tarded which means that 
they have a limited amount 
of learning ability. Some of 
them may be able to learn 
to write while others can 
only learn how to put lolli- 
pops in their mouths. 

"That's the reason it is so 
important to have contact 
with the children," com- 
mented Julie. 




Elizabeth Stewart 
Mary Stolipher 
Derrik Suter 
Kim Swiger 
Donna Swisher 
Sandra Swisher 



Christine Taylor 
Teresa Taylor 
Linda Taylor 
Judy Tennant 
Bob Tinnell 
Steven Triplett 



Donna Troy 
Debbie Turney 
Thomas Walker 
Sharon Weaver 
Tim Weekley 
William Weekley 



Wera Westfall 
Susan Whitehair 
Kristi Williams 
Jill Wood 
Martha Wright 
Sheila Yost 



Class of '81/193 



Julie Adams 

Cynthia Anderson 

Shirley Ashcraft 

Debra Ayers 

Christine Banvard 

Deborah Bennett 



Lisa Boggs 

Beverley Bolland 

Bonnie Bolt 

Garry Bourne 

Janet Burkhart 

Valerie Cacace 



Rosemary Cain 

Dorothy Case 

Helen Casto 

James Chapman 

Brian Clayton 

Linda Cross 



Linda Cutlip 

Susan Decker 

Richard Donko 

Michael Edmond 

Malee Evans 

Catherine Figler 



Richard Fisher 

Kathie Forman 

Millie Fullerton 

Ramona Gonda 

Christie Goodwin 

Mary Anne Gorrell 



Raymond Grose 

Sally Haddox 

Jannette Hanek 

Danette Hardman 

Karen Harpold 

Pamela Hennen 



Martha Henry 

Tammy Holt 

Fleeta Kisner 

Marta Knight 

Linda Lang 

Cynthia Lanyon 



Gary Maditz 

Larry Maditz 

Susan Marsh 

Kim Marsh 

Nancy Marzano 

Susan Mason 



Donna Merrifield 

Crystal Mick 

Monica Mihaliak 

Vicki Morris 

Patricia Moss 

Sheila Perrine 




194/Class of '82 




Nothing's raining 
on his parade 

Taking a position of authority 
sounds demanding. Well, it is. But for 
Bill Gorell, it has proven beneficial 
for his future as a teacher. 

A junior music major from Middle- 
bourne, Bill tried out for the college 
marching band's drum major post. "I 
have been given partial responsibility 
of the band on and off the field, which 
will help immensely in my future en- 
deavors as a band director." 

As drum major, Bill works on show- 
manship, music conducting skills and 
over-all self-control. When asked 
about his performance, he "was 
pleased but could do better. I want to 
improve my showmanship." 

Difficulties include discipline. "It's 
hard when all the students are of age." 
Yet, to Bill, the 1979 group seems to 
have been the best in the three years 
he's been here. "Sometimes I forget 
how hard it is to play and march at 
the same time." 

A lot of extra performances mean 
only one hour credit for a class meet- 
ing three hours a week. "I just wish 
that more students would find time to 
participate in our organization. We 
can never have enough participation." 




Nancy Poling 
Susan Robinson 
Mary Romine 



Gina Rosena 
Gordon Sadala 
Kelcie Smith 



Melanie Spencer 
Joyce Stephens 
Judy Stickler 



Joyce Succurro 
Marsha Taylor 
Mark Thompson 



Joyce Walker 
Kyle Whetsel 
Jean Williams 



Michael Williams 
Mary Wilmoth 
Barry Wills 



Class of '82/195 



Today's assignment: 
Write your own obituary 



"Think about how long 
your life is, then think 
about how long your death 
is," says Father Jude Molnar 
in his Death and Dying 
class. 

Linda Yost and Judy 
Bright are two of the stu- 
dents in the class. "The 
class tries to give you a full 
understanding of death," 
said Linda. Death is a sub- 
ject rarely discussed in the 
home and the class was of- 
fered to help people under- 
stand death. "Father Jude 
presents things that I have 
known, but never thought 
about, in depth. The class 
makes me think about these 
things," said Judy. 

Linda and Judy both said 
that there are days when 
they leave the class laugh- 
ing and days when they feel 
really depressed. Emotions 
play a big part in the class. 
People will be talking about 
experiences and start 
crying. 



"Father Jude does not put 
his opinion in — one way or 
another. He lets us decide, 
when we are having a class 
discussion, which is the 
right answer for ourselves," 
says Linda. 

They both had to write 
their own obituaries and set 
a time of death for when 
they felt they would die. 
Both felt it was a weird ex- 
perience. 

"People pay money to go 
see movies where people 
get killed and blown up. 
Parents let their children 
see movies with a lot of 
killing before they would 
let them see one containing 
a lot of sex. Yet parents 
rarely sit and talk to their 
children about death," said 
Linda. 

"I think the class gives me 
a better understanding of 
death than I had before," 
says Judy. "People need to 
understand death and learn 
to live with it." 




■ ^ Illft 




Kim Alonso 

Kim Anderson 

Kelly Bail 

Sarah Bassett 

Adam Bennett 



Steve Billings 

Bonnie Blake 

Jim Boggs 

Larry Bonasso 

Olive Bowers 



Dwayne Boyce 

Darlene Brown 

Donna Brunetti 

Lisa Campbell 

Dave Carey 



Todd Carey 

Leslie Carpenter 

Phillip Chambers 

Tammie Chandler 

Anita Clendenin 





^k^Tv 




196/Class of 83 




Besty Coffman 
Laura Cowell 
Michael Crawley 
{ill Cunningham 
Steve Dawson 



Sue DeGeorge 
Kim Demary 
Patricia Dixon 
Laura Dugan 
Micki Edens 



George Edmiston 
David Evans 
Katharine Eyler 
Donna Fernandez 
Marcella Fineran 



Brian Foland 
Brenda Gable 
Lee Ann Gerkin 
Cheryl Given 
Janet Glaspell 



Peggy Goff 
Connie Gordon 
Denise Gower 
Mary Jo Hall 
Lura Hammer 



Laura Hanlon 
June Harvey 
Michelle Haught 
Shelley Heinzman 
Duane Heishman 




FRESHMEN COUNSELOR Wadie 
Blanks gives instructions to 
freshman during an orientation 
game. 



Class of '81/197 



Ellen Hoban 

Marlene Holbert 

Amy Home 



Robin Jenkins 
Becky Johns 
Marcia Jones 



Brauna Kennedy 

Lanna Klien 

Mindy Knepper 



John Koerner 

Tom Lehosit 

Diana Lowermilk 



Maria Lucente 

Jane Lusk 

Melissa Manzo 



Susan Masters 

Connie McClure 

Mary McDermott 



Carolyn McKain 

Adrienne Meikle 

David Miller 



Kathy Mills 
Debbie Morris 
Pam Mullenix 







Terry Ice 
Kim Isner %\ 

Mary Jenkins 







1 








ft 



®S«nP 

















Hofbauer enjoys 
technical aspects 

When most people talk about the- 
ater and show business, they think 
about the actor. Well, there is another 
real part of theater, technical theater, 
whose enthusiasts are called "techies". 
Fairmont State has one of those "tech- 
ies", senior John Hofbauer. 

"I like acting, but my real interest is 
in tech," he said. John has worked 
with productions here such as "Lady 
Windermere's Fan," "Fiddler on the 
Roof," "Leave It To Jane," "Mary, 
Mary," "The Sound of Music", "A 
Midsummer's Night Dream," "The 
Corn Is Green," "Hamlet," "I Never 
Sang For My Father," and he will as- 
sume the responsibility of technical 
director for "The Lady's not for Burn- 
ing." 

His job will be to coordinate the 
technical aspects of the show, such as 
lights and sound, and repair all equip- 
ment. He has done lights for a number 
of student directed one acts and many 
reader theaters. 

"I plan to work summer residency 
somewhere, but I'm not sure where 
right now," he explained. 

John plans to major in Speech and 
Theater with concentration in theater 
next fall at the University of Oregon. 



198/Class of '83 




KELLY SPRADLING 
participates in an activity at 
Freshman Orienation. 




Kathy Murphy 
Leslie Haumann 
Kathern Newbrough 
Angela Oakes 
Deborah Perrine 
Debbie Pritt 
Dan Raines 

Don Reed 
Mark Refosco 
Elizabeth Riggs 
Leo Riley 
Vicky Riley 
Clarence Runion 
Janet Scott 

Candie Seese 
Dorinda Setliff 
Ladonna Shaffer 
Kelly Spradling 
Jolinda Stump 
Michael Thompson 
Tracy Thompson 

Kristine Urda 
Janet Vorselen 
David Walker 
Nadine Waslosky 
Debbie Weaver 
Scott Weaver 
Diana Wells 

Steve Williams 
Kathryn Workman 
Joyce Wright 
Andy Wu 
Charles Wugate 
Ramona Yelcich 
Leanne Yost 



Class of '83/199 




FAIRMONT . . . 

the community and the college 



STEVE WARREN as Mayor Hicks incorporates the talent of 

in the Masquers' Town and Gown townspeople as well as that of FSC 

production of "Leave it to Jane." theater students. 
Town and Gown Theater 






(faktt^ 

Blue Ribbon 




'I've got Pabst Blue Ribbon on my mind! 



PABST BREWING COMPANY. Milwaukee. Peoria Heights. Newark. Los Angeles, Pabst Georgia 



202/Advertisers 



KETTERING'S 



COUNTRY STYLE 



BREAD 



East Side Florist 



Large enough to serve you - 

small enough to care 
"Flowers for all Occasions' 

501 Morgantown Ave. 

Fairmont WV 26554 

Dial 363-7390 




GOOD LUCK, 
GRADS 





®ff pQQtPDuQCDmG t$m 



.BANK/ 



^tonc CTfco**** 



PandOHt-SoudeM 



Stores in Fairmont-Clarksburg-Buckhannon 



Advertisers/203 



IE 

ED 



Community Bank and Trust, N.A. 



204/Advertisers 




Middletown Mall 



Fairmont WV 



304-363-1000 







SPECIALIZING IN 
CHAR-KO SEAFOOD 

STEAKS BROASTED 

On Sizzling CHICKEN 

Platters 

CARRY OUT SERVICE 

CATERING SERVICE 

FOR BANQUETS 

PARTIES, WEDDINGS 

ETC. 



"We Feed The Champs" 

Owned and Operated 

by 
Al Sabo, FSC Alumni 




905 Country Club Rd. 



Phone 363-9761 



FREY 
HOME FOR FUNERALS 



320 Madison St. 

Fairmont WV 26554 

363-3171 




luqenawitlta 



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uaic. 



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902-904 Fairmont Ave. 
Fairmont, W. Va. 26554 



Fendor, Guitars and Amplifiers 

Gibson, Martin, Sigma, 

Ibenez, Gretch and Hando 

Guitars and Accessories 

"We service what we sell" 



Robert B. Frey Sr., William M. Frey 
Directors 




LIGHT & HEAVY DUTY TOWING 



RADIO DISPATCHED 



CALL RALPH - 

366-5555 



HAYMOND'S 

WRECKER SERVICE 

1105 COUNTRY CLUB RD. 




Office Furniture 

Typewriter sales — service 

Hallmark Cards — Gifts 



Adams 
Office Supply 



210 Adams St. 



Ph. - 363-0651 



Frank Spataro 

President 
304-366-9220 



Fiat 
Subaru 
Honda 



Century Motet Inc. 

Fairmont, West Virginia 26554 
SPECIALISTS IN SERVICE 



Lighting-Heating-Insulation and Supplies 



V&W ELECTRIC AND SUPPLY 



107 Jackson St. - P.O. Box 468 

Farimont, WV 26554 

Phone 366-4326 



GRAVELY TRACTORS, INC. 



MNB 




2032 Fairmont Ave. 

Fairmont, WV 26554 

Phone 

366-4690 



Middletown National Bank 
Middletown Mall 



Compliments of 

JACK AND JILL CLEANERS 

112 Fairmont Ave. 

Alterations of all kinds 

and storage 



"Your friendly personal service bank" 

Member Federal Reserve System and 

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



Men's wear 



Formal Rentals 



206/ Advertisers 




103 Years Strong Because 

We've Built Our Future On Yours 

1877-1980 



In downtown Fairmont 



366-3600 



fll E M0SE6ACH 

ELECTRIC & SUPPLY 



and 



Liqlilitvj 



909 Morgantown Ave. 

Fairmont, WV 26554 

Phone 366-4060 



LE VINE'S 



Men's Wear 



Women's Wear 



323 Adams St. 
Fairmont, West Virginia 




Complete Chevrolet 
Sales and Service 

"Marion County's 
Volume Dealer" 

1 229 Country Club Road 
Phone 366-3500 



Advertisers/207 



ylbntiac 



© 



PITROLO 



PONTIAC 



CADILLAC CO. 



Fairmont, WV 



Ph. 366-3100 



^ 




Charleston Federal 



Savings and Loan Association 

Mortgage Loan Office 

1207 Fairmont Ave. 

Fairmont, WV 26554 

Phone 366-2577 



Area Code 304 Tel. 363-2243 



FERTIG CABINET CO., INC. 



Kitchen Cabinets, Vanities, Formica Tops 




Boise Cascade 
Cabinets 



100 Merchant St. 
Fairmont, WV 26554 




CARTOON 

DECORATING 

FOR THE KIDDIES 

OR ANY 
NOVELTY DESIGN 
■ YOU PROVIDE 



BIRTHDAY 

AND 

ANNIVERSARY 
CAKES 

BAKED FRESH DAILY 
1 HOUR SERVICE 
IN MOST INSTANCES 
ANY ORDER BY 2 PM 
WILL BE READY BY 4 PM 

366-4911 

HRS: 9 AM - 4 PM - WEEKDAYS 
9 AM NOON SAT. 
SELECT PASTRIES 
217 MONROF 



Is Someone Looking 
For You In This Year's 

MOUND? 



Be here next year by having your 

picture taken by the portrait 

photographer this fall. 



F&B AUTO REPAIR 

Rt 73 Meadowdale, WV 
363-7456 

Auto and Truck 
repair 

Service for drums 

and rotors for cars 

and trucks 

208/ Advertisers 




Follow THE COLUMNS 

for the dates, times 

and places. 

We'll Be Looking 
For You! 



FSC Student Publications 

Rooms 110-119-120 LRC 

Phone 367-4135 




A MAN CAN GROW 



CT. -/l/?c/ faep Oo Growhg 

WITH OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS COMPANY 




Ours is a growing company and we can 
grow together in fields where a man has 
ample opportunity and room to carve out a 
satisfying hfe-time career 

We offer you stability that is inherent in 
the business of manufacturing and distrib- 
uting a variety of goods, continually being 
broadened by the development of new 
products reaching new markets 

You can enjoy the advantages that come 
from association with a company which is 
outstanding in reputation and prestige in 
its field. 

You can benefit from a training program 
that has proved its worth to a large number 
of young men during the past several years 
as we have expanded our operations. 

You can have the security to be found in 
an organization where men stay and grow 



with a growing company, where there are 
liberal life and health insurance plans, and 
solidly established retirement plans 



OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS COMPANY LINES INCLUDE: 

Duraglas bottles and iars • Closures 

Plastic containers • Plastic fitments 

Corrugated paper shipping boxes 

Multiwall bags • Kraft paper for boxes 

Glass television bulbs • Glass tubing 

Glass rod • Electrical insulators 

Laboratory glass • Vials • Ampuls 

Libbey Safedge tumblers and stemware 

Glass block • Hardwood panels and doors 



We are interested in qualified young men 
with either technical or non-technical back- 
grounds for training in sales, production 
management or general engineering We 
invite those interested to write directly to: 



Director, Selection of Specialized Personnel 



MAKERS OF @ PRODUCTS 



O 



I 



WENS-ILLINOIS 

Glass Container Division 

plant • fairmont, west virginia 



Advertisers /209 



The best of it all — 

when it comes to fashion with value 

come to 



Watson's 



Middletown Mall 
Shop daily 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. 




Compliments of 

Henry and Hardesty 
Insurance 



517 Fairmont Ave. 
Phone - 363-7000 



MAUNZ 

"Dress well 
and succeed" 



Middletown Mall 



where you always 
find more for less! 



Hrk A The Work and Fashion Clothing Store 

ML ML m^& Downtown Clarksburg • Middletown Mall 



GENERAL ENGINEERING 



P.O. Box 1049 

Fairmont, WV 26554 

Phone - 363-3270 



A KqI /\ Abe1 ' Diana Ka y; 188 

IXUCL 1 \. Adams, Jeff L.; 152, 176 

Adams, Julie; 159, 194 
ADAMS OFFICE SUPPLY; 206 
Adkins, Harry F.; 159, 188 
Administration Staff; 116-117 
Adrian, Dianne M.; 74 
Advertisements; 202-211 
Alessandrini, Mary J.; 148 
Allaire, Maury; 149 
Allen, Andre; 65, 66, 68 
Allessio, Annette; 45 
Allevato, Louis F.; 153 
Allied Health; 118-121 
Allman, Beth A.; 150, 176 
Allman, Deborah L.; 10 
Allman, Nancy; 176 
Allman, Robert T.; 161 
Alonso, Kim M.; 196 
Alpha Xi Delta; 144 
American Chemical Society; 156 
American Institute for Drafting and Design; 

156 
Anderson, Beth A.; 166 
Anderson, Cynthia; 194 
Anderson, Kathy J.; 174, 176 
Anderson, Kimberly; 196 
Anderson, Mary M.; 166, 176 
Anglin, Roger J.; 188 
ANTHONY CHEVROLET; 207 
Arasteh, Parvaneh; 164, 176 
Arbogast, Cathy; 188, 101 
Argenti, James S.; 31, 35 
Armendariz, Susan; 188 
Armstrong, Cynthia J.; 150, 155 
Arnett, Lary J.; 82 

Artists Liberation Organization; 157 
Arts, The; 126-129 
Ashburn, Carol A.; 172 
Ashcraft, Shirley M.; 194 
Ashton, James E. Ill; 31, 32, 102 
Atkins, Cydney D.; 163 
Audia, Frank J. Jr.; 172 
Austin, James C; 100 
Auteri, Roxann; 176 
Ayers, Debra L.; 52, 110, 175, 194 



153 



BBacco, William R. 
Bahamas; 76-77 
Bail, Kelly A.; 156, 162, 196 
Bailey, Jeffrey L.; 153, 188 
Bailey, Jon R.; 153 
Baird, Kenneth R.; 93 
Baker, Jeffery, L.; 154 
Ball, Gordon R.; 31 
Ballas, Tina C; 145 
Banvard, Christine A.; 38, 39, 194 
Baptist Campus Ministry; 157 
Barker, Daniel; 157, 176 
Barr, David L.; 102 
Barr, Terry L.; 165 
Barr, Tracy A.; 165 
Barton, Tom E.; 12, 21, 127, 166 
Bartrug, Katherine; 163, 188 
Baseball; 102-103 
Basile, Donna L.; 188 
Basile, Mary C; 148 
Basketball; 64-71 
Bassett, Lila E.; 45, 174 
Bassett, Sarah F.; 196 
Batson, David; 118, 156 
Bauber, Lee; 153 
Bauer, Robert 118 
Beaford, Kevin; 65, 67 
Beale, Kathryn E.; 90, 172, 176 
Bean, Carol; 150, 188 
Beavers, Beth L.; 148 
Behzadi, Bahman; 164 
Behzadi, Hamid; 164 
Bell, Jack; 149 
Bell, Mary; 166 
Bell, Randall J.; 152 
Belli, Sandy; 154 
Belmear, Michael; 117 



Belotte, John T.; 79, 163 

Bennett, Adam M.; 100, 196 

Bennett, Deborah A.; 128, 158, 165, 170, 194 

Bennett, Denise E.; 7, 113, 165, 188 

Bennett, Jerry K.; 149 

Bennett, Robin J.; 22, 23, 52, 176, 101 

Bennett, Sherry L.; 164, 169, 172, 176 

Bennington, Karen S.; 188 

Berke, Darlene; 177 

Berry, Krystal D.; 188 

Berry, Sharla S.; 177 

Berry, Steven F.; 31 

Best, Randall D.; 31, 147, 153 

Beto, Mary F.; 159, 165 

Bias, Duane L.; 31, 36, 158 

Billings, Stephen W.; 196 

Birdsell, Gary L.; 146, 177 

Bish, Lisa A.; 166 

Bishop, Gregory M.; 31, 146, 154 

Bissett, James A.; 173 

Black Student Union; 158 

Blake, Bonnie L.; 196 

Blake, George W.; 158 

Bland, Deborah A.; 166 

Blankenship, Donna J.; 166 

Blanks, Wadie; 27, 172, 177, 197 

Blatt, Carol L.; 177 

Boayer, Richard; 152 

Bock, Edward; 177 

Boggs, Catherine A.; 177 

Boggs, James; 196 

Boggs, Lisa K.; 194 

Bohnke, David; 118 

Bokanovich, Joni L.; 52 

Bolian, S. Joseph; 177 

Bolland, Beverly R.; 110, 158, 194 

Bolt, Bonnie; 163, 194 

Bolyard, Pamela D.; 156, 169, 172, 177 

Bonasso, Larry R.; 196 

Bonnett, Raymond D.; 31, 34, 103 

Booth, Deborah A.; 12, 21, 158, 166, 188 

Booth, Tammy J.; 165, 188 

Boram, William A. 116, 223 

Bourne, Garry A.; 165, 171, 194 

Bowers, Olive M.; 159, 163, 196 

Bowyer, Reverend; 170, 174 

Bowyer, Richard M.; 152 

Boyce, Chris; 165, 171, 188 

Boyce, Julie; 188 

Boyce, Kay E.; 39 

Boyce, Kimberly H.; 145 

Boyd, Terry L.; 93, 100 

Boyle, Diana; 118 

Boyles, Kathryn A.; 60, 150, 172 

Bradley, Brian P.; 167, 168 

Bradshaw, Margaret E.; 144, 166, 188 

Bragg, Thomas W.; 169 

Braham, Alice M.; 188 

Brasher, Kathryn M.; 188 

Brooks, Jeffrey S.; 31 

Broschart, Jeffery A.; 160, 171 

Brown, Becky; 188 

Brown, Christina B.; 188 

Brown, Darlene F.; 166, 196 

Brown, David C; 188 

Brown, Helen R.; 173 

Brown, Kelli B.; 150 

Brown, Kimberly E.; 82, 174 

Brown, Kimberly Elaine; 175, 188 

Brown, Sharon K.; 189 

Brown, Tammie S.; 163 

Brown, Troi D.; 52, 177 

Brown, William; 62, 119 

Brugnoli, Mary A.; 156 

Bruner, Susan; 177 

Brunetti, Donna M.; 196 

Brunfield, Rodney; 189 

Buchanan, Cynthia D.; 148 

Buckey, Lynn A.; 148, 163, 177 

Buda, Joseph E.; 189 

Bullock, Penny H.; 150 

Bunner, Delia; 172, 177 

Burkhart, Janet L.; 194 

Burnette, William W.; 156 

Burns, Bob; 14 

Burns, Ruth; 119 



212/Index 



Burns, Thomas M.; 22, 100 

Burnside, Lisa K.; 135 

Bush, Elizabeth A.; 150, 172, 177 

Butcher, Steven B.; 152, 153 

Butcher, Vicki L.; 165 

Byard, Tim A.; 31 

Byers, George; 171 

Byles, Kathryn; 189 



CCacace, Valerie; 148, 163, 194 
Cain, Cynthia D.; 177 
Cain, Rosemary; 194 
Calabrase, Ann E.; 143, 163 
Caldwell, Bill; 83 
Cameron, Colin; 117 
Campbell, Carol C; 177 
Campbell, Lisa J.; 196 
Campbell, Renee E.; 144 
Canfield, Karen L.; 39, 52, 145 
Cann, Anthony; 31, 191, 103 
Cannon, George; 116 
Capp, Bruce E.; 153 
Captor, Kip L.; 146, 189 
Carey, David P.; 196 
Carey, Todd A.; 196 
Carpenter, Leslie D.; 159 
Carpenter, Leslie R.; 196 
Carpenter, William; 119 
Carr, Cheryl A.; 74, 152, 159, 189 
Carr, Delores K.; 173 
Carr, Kelly L.; 28, 86, 87 
Carson, Leta; 119 
Carsone, Anthony J.; 31 
Casagranda, Nancy J.; 174, 177 
Case, Dorothy L.; 194 
Casini, Albert J. Jr.; 153 
Cassera, Alfred J. Jr.; 147, 153, 177 
Casteel, Michele; 117 
Casto, Beth E.; 162, 177 
Casto, Helen E.; 194 
Castor, Kip; 153 
Cather, Dotson; 120 
Cavallo, Terri R.; 44, 45 
Cavender, Sandra J.; 148, 155 
Cayton, Nancy M.; 177 
CENTURY MOTOR INC.; 206 
Chamber Singers; 158 
Chambers, Phillip D.; 31, 196 
Chandler, Tammie L.; 145, 196 
Chapman, Catherine A.; 189 
Chapman, James A.; 194 
Chapman, Lisa R.; 189 
Chapman, Marshall; 27 
CHARLESTON FEDERAL; 208 
Cheerleaders; 78-79 
Chenoweth, Peggy L.; 162, 164, 177 
Cheslock, Terri R.; 189 
Chicarelli, John; 159 
Chipps, Celeste J.; 178 
Christafore, Kathy; 189 
Christian, Kirk D.; 31 
Christian Student Union; 159 
Church, Samuel; 93, 120 
Citron, Lester; 17 
CITY NATIONAL BANK; 203 
Clagett, Rebecca L.; 145, 155, 178 
Claremont, Edward; 118, 120 
Clark, Debra J.; 150, 189 
Clayton, Brian J.; 194 
Clayton, Connie C; 145 
Clelland, Patricia K.; 178 
Clement, Teri L.; 166 
Clendenin, Anita J.; 196 
Cline, Jackie S.; 165 
Closing; 222, 224 
Clouston, Marvin; 161 
Codd, Marcy L.; 178 
Coe, Jeffrey S.; 153 
Coe, Sandra; 150 

Coffindaffer, Dorothy; 120, 122, 162 
Coffman, Elizabeth; 159, 165, 197 
Coffman, Mary C; 189 
Coffman, Michael E.; 31 
Cogar, Linda L.; 145, 154, 163, 178 



Colborn, Catherine A.; 157 

Cole, Lana; 52 

Colebank, Carl; 121 

Colebank, Peggy A.; 178 

Coleman, James; 121, 156 

Collegiates; 159 

Collins, James M.; 153 

Collins, John F.; 31, 35 

Collins, Michael T,; 65 

Collins, Vickie A.; 178 

Colombo, Craig C; 149 

Colombo, Marie J.; 178 

Colophon; 221 

Coltelli, Larry R.; 154 

Commencement; 106-109 

Commerce; 122-123 

COMMUNITY BANK AND TRUST; 204 

Conaway, John; 117 

Conley, Kathleen M.; 120, 173 

Connell, Sabrinna W.; 73, 178 

Conrad, Richard; 73 

Conrad, Richard F.; 31 

Contraski, Irella F.; 160, 189 

Conway, Cynthia L.; 178 

Cook, Franklin D.; 31, 34 

Cook, John S.; 164 

Cook, Vickie L.; 123 

Cooper, Dave; 65 

Cooper, Debra A.; 175 

Cooper, William R.; 154 

Copeland, Ronald L.; 159, 165, 168, 171 

Copley, Virginia L.; 169, 179 

Corl, Candace K.; 143, 179 

Corley, Darryl H.; 65, 67, 69 

"Corn Is Green"; 20-21 

Corsini, David L.; 179 

Costion, Pamela; 189 

Cowell, Laura E.; 197 

Cowger, Deborah L.; 148, 175 

Cox, Betty Bea; 15 

Cox, Homer; 117 

Cox, Jacklyn R.; 189 

Cox, Kimberly; 149 

Craft, Curtis W.; 65 

Craft, Elizabeth G.; 147, 148, 189 

Crane, Jeffrey L.; 31 

Craven, Charlie; 153 

Crawley, Michael D.; 197 

Crites, David D.; 153, 167, 179 

Cronin, Richard J. IV; 160 

Cross Country; 22-23 

Cross, Randall J.; 154, 167 

Cross, Linda Sue; 39, 101, 194 

Cross, Susan L.; Ill, 173, 189 

Cuetnick, Steve; 154 

Cummings, Mary E.; 189 

Cunningham, Donna J.; 145 

Cunningham, Emily J.; 197 

Cunningham, Glennis; 121 

Cupp, Michael J.; 152 

Cupp, Rebecca J.; 145, 189 

Current, Jennifer; 11 

Custer, David; 103 

Cutlip, Linda L.; 101, 194 

Cutright, Michael W.; 149 

Cutright, Steve W.; 31 

Cutsy, Brenda K.; 145 



DDailey, Margaret A.; 145, 155 
Dana, Duranne P.; 179 
Darrah, Randy G.; 166 
Daugherty, Debra P.; 163, 179 
Daugherty, Patrick G.; 165 
Davidson, Gibbs; 152 
Davis, Barbara J.; 166 
Davis, Bucky; 103, 168 
Davis, Elizabeth S.; 148, 179 
Davis, J.B.; 149 
Davis, Sandra J.; 52, 53 
Davis, Sandra L.; 172 
Davis, Sandy A.; 179 
Dawson, George S.; Ill, 113, 197 
Dawson, Twila D.; 145 
Dean, Martin J.; 31 



Dean 



Index/213 



Debolt 



Debolt, L. Diane; 166 

Decker. Susan E.; 165, 194 

Deem, Eber H.; 146, 147. 151, 165 

DeFebbo. Lori A.; 173, 189 

DeGeorge, Suzanne M.; 150, 197 

Dehner, Joyce R.; 72, 179 

Delaney, Mary K.; 150, 155 

Dellamea. Elaine M.; 60, 145 

Delta Sigma Rho-Tau Kappa Alpha; 160 

Delovich, Mary A.; 179 

DeMary, Betty A.; 189 

DeMary, Kimberly J.; 197 

DeStefano, Diane L.; 45, 150 

Detwyler, Kathy M.; 189 

Devison, Kathy; 120 

Dixon, Patricia E.; 197 

Dobbins, Lisa M.; 189 

Dodge, Stephen D.; 93, 94, 149 

Dodrill, Patricia; 86, 87 

Doe, Wendy A.; 179 

Dolog, Paula J.; 179 

Domico, Angela M.; 157 

Donham, Patricia A.; 165, 172, 179 

Donko, Richard. J.; 172, 194 

Donley, Janis; 150 

Dorm vs. Apartment; 110, 113 

110-113 
Dornick, William B.; 92, 93 
Dotson, Cynthia V.; 150 
Downey, Laura; 79 
Drennen, George; 75 
Drown. Anthony R.; 31 
Drummond, Karen; 147, 171 
Duffield, Frederick E.; 31 
Dugan, Brent; 14 
Dugan, Laura J.; 197 
Dumire, Jane; 121 
Dunn, Billy; 117 
Dye, Richard L.; 22, 23, 100 
Dye, William E.; 170 



EEakin, Jeanine L.; 189 
Eakle. Richard A.; 154 
Earle, Roger; 27 
Earley, Kristina L.; 189 
Earnest, Vanessa J.; 166 
EAST SIDE FLORAL: 203 
Eddy, Michael P.; 153 
Eddy, Tammy J.; 166 
Eden, Michele A.; 197 
Edge. Diane L.; 173 
Edmiston, George M.; 197 
Edmond, Michael B.; 173, 194 
Education; 124-125 
Edwards, Jan E.; 179 
Edwards, Paul; 117 
Efaw, Terry L.; 189 
Elbon, Cheryle A.; 189 
Elbon, Mark W.; 149 
Elder, Gregory D.; 153 
Elderhostel; 16, 17 
Ellifritt, Betty J.; 179 
Elliot, Michael; 122, 149 
Elmer, Linda J.; 165, 171, 173, 189 
Elmer, Susan; 73, 159, 165, 179 
Engineering Technological Society; 160 
Enos, Kate; 15 
Epsilon Pi Tau; 161 
Estes, Joel D.; 31 
Evans, Ann M.; 194 
Evans, David H.; 165, 197 
Everett, Joyce A.; 152 
Eyler, Katharine H.; 197 



FFabre, Billie G.; 173 
Fairmont's Friendly Flavor; 2-7 
Faison, David; 31 
Falcone, Angelina; 52 
Fanto, Debra S.; 179 
Farell, John L.; 31 
Farley, Brenda; 23, 101, 179 
Farley, Gary M.; 31 



Faulk, Harry; 122, 168 

Fayoyin, Mary Jo; 117 

Fazio, Christine; 21, 166 

F&B AUTO REPAIR: 208 

Feather, Kathy L.; 159, 169 

Feola, Dennis M.; 31 

Ferguson, Jay; 26, 90 

Ferguson, Maynard; 6, 89 

Fernandez, Donna K.; 197 

Feronti, John T.; 42 

Ferree, Jeffery; 162 

FERTIG CABINET CO., INC.; 208 

Fields, Sharon; 166, 189 

Figler, Cathy; 27, 144, 159, 173, 194 

Fineran, Marcella I.; 168, 171, 197 

Fink, Joyce; 145 

Fisher, Richard; 159, 165, 194 

Fitch, John; 122 

Flamini, Anna Marie; 169, 189 

Flanagan, Brian; 165, 168 

Flesher, Martha E.; 148 

Flint, Woodrow W.; 153 

Flynn, Payton; 158 

Foland, Brian; 149, 197 

Ford, Brad; 15 

Ford, Eleanor; 123 

Football; 30, 37 

Forman, Kathie; 194 

Forren, Richard; 156, 160 

Fortney, Robert A.; 153 

4-H Club; 162 

Fragale, Dean J.; 153 

Fraley, Elizabeth; 179 

Frederickson, Erik; 7, 168 

Freeman, Catherine; 142 

Freshman Orientation; 18-19 

Freshmen; 196-199 

FREY HOME FOR FUNERALS; 105 

Frisenda, Tina M.; 159 

Fromhart, Louise; 190 

Frontino, Michael; 179 

Fry, Karen; 180 

Frye, Elizabeth; 123 

FSC Student Publications; 208 

Fugater, Tami; 190 

Fulayter, Steven; 170, 190 

Fulda, Michael; 123, 164 

Fullerton, Mildred; 158, 165, 194 

Fulmer, Robert; 31 

Furman, Phillip; 31 

Future Secretaries Club; 162 



G Gable, Brenda K.; 197 
Gable, Howard L.; 21 
Gallaher, Deborah L.; 173, 190 
Gallimore, Dorothy L.; 163, 165, 172, 180 
Gallman, William; 31 
Gantz, Norma E.; 164, 170 
Garcia, Sharon; 165 
Gates, Cindy; 15 
Gatrell, Steven; 123, 169 
Gaudio, Anthony J.; 153 
Gearde, Lisa F.; 190 
Geary, Donald L.; 31, 35, 36 
Gebert, Larry; 31, 60 
Geffrey, Michael B.; 93, 95, 153 
Gerasimovich, Steven; 153 
Gerkin, Lea Ann; 168, 171, 197 
Gerrard, Mary E.; 23, 163, 180, 101 
Gibbs, Kelly; 145 
Gifford, Philip E. Jr.; 93, 95 
Girondo, Robyn M.; 60, 147, 150, 165, 172, 190 
Giuliani, Pamela S.; 180 
Given, Cheryl Jean; 157, 197 
Glaspell, Janet L.; 197 
Glod, Robert P.; 31 
Glover, Abby; 174 
Godshalk, John R.; 31, 32 
Goehringer, Tammy L.; 82 
Goff, Michael D.; 153 
Goff, Peggy A.; 197 
Golden, Kelly M.; 180 
Goldsberry, Keith A.; 128, 159, 165, 189 
Goldsmith, Sandra L.; 39, 91, 101, 164, 169, 
172, 180 



214/Index 



Gonda, Ramona; 194 

Good, Steve D.; 31 

Goodwin, Christie A.; 194 

Goodwin, James; 123 

Goodwin, Ronald; 124 

Gorby, Barbara J.; 190 

Gordan, Connie J.; 165, 197 

Gorgonio, Saundra L.; 150 

Gorley, Barbara; 173 

Gorrell, Mary A.; 194 

Gorrell, William K.; 112, 158, 159, 165, 168, 

190 
Gossard, D. Scott; 167, 100 
Gould, Brenda L.; 160, 172 
Gouzd, Christine A.; 172, 190 
Govine, Andre; 31 
Gower, Barbara D.; 165, 173, 197 
Grasty, Margaret A.; 4, 224 
GRAVELY TRACTORS, INC.; 206 
Greaser, Jeffrey L.; 153 
Greco, Edward C; 31 
Greely, Mary L.; 180 
Green, Stephanie D.; 190 
Greene, Terry K.; 86 
Greenleaf, Catherine L.; 163, 190 
Greenleaf, Rebecca J.; 180 
Greza, George J.; 159, 165, 180 
Griffith, Mark; 152 
Griscom, William; 124, 142, 161 
Grocott, Carter; 124 
Grogg, Deborah S.; 166, 190 
Grose, Edward; 116 
Grose, Raymond S.; 160, 194 
Grose, Rebecca J.; 159 
Gross, Rachel A.; 117 
Groves, Stanley; 117 
Grubb, Jeffrey L.; 154 
Gum, Lindel; 12 
Guseman, Donna M.; 166 
Gwinn, Pamela G.; 190 



HHaddix, Mike 153 
Haddox, Sally Marie; 145, 194 
Hadley, Harry; 117 
Hadorn, Julie 162 
Hahn, Judy; 180 
Haines, Janet; 190 
Halbert, Jill F.; 145 
Hales, James 124, 143 
Hall, Mara; 148 
Hall, Mary Jo; 197 
Hall, Michael; 154 
Hall, Timothy; 152 
Hall, Valerie A.; 190 
Haller, Roger W.; 180 
Haller, Thomas; 160, 164, 169, 170, 180 
Hammer, Lura Catherine; 197 
Hamric, Pamela; 166 
Hamrick, Brian; 22, 23, 100 
Hamrick, Jeffrey; 153 
Hanek, Jeannette; 194 
Hanlon, Laura; 159, 197 
Hanna, Diane L.; 82, 150, 163, 190 
Hannah, David; 31 
Hannah, Fredrick; 153 
Hanood, Michael; 154, 168 
Harby, Christine; 23 
Hardman, Danette; 172, 194 
Hardman, Teresa; 148 
Hardway, Hannah; 116 
Hardway, Wendell; 49, 116 
Harley, Debra; 119, 173 
Harlow, Julie 150 
Harwey, Courtney M.; 153 
Harpold, David; 147, 151 
Harpold, Dennis; 168 
Harpold, Karen; 194 
Harris, Chester W.; 166, 190 
Harris, Hobart W.; 180 
Harris, Melanie; 125 
Harrison, Christopher; 65, 66 
Harrison, Donna J.; 145 
Hart, Charlene M.; 145, 180 
HARTLEY'S; 207 
Hartlieb, Kent M.; 152 



Harvey, June E.; 197 

Hatfield, Carol A.; 144, 170 

Hathaway, Leslie L.; 150 

Haught, Beth A.; 165, 172 

Haught, Michelle L.; 197 

Haught, Valjean; 172, 180 

Hawkins, Jeff L.; 153 

HAYMOND'S WRECKER SERVICE; 205 

Haynes, Stephen; 125 

Heasley, Gill; 52 

Heaster, Connie; 159, 164, 172 

Heck, James D.; 152 

Heemback, Lynn; 154 

Heffner, Mike; 15 

Heffner, Robert; 143 

Heimbach, Robert L.; 167 

Heinzman, Shelley K.; 197 

Heishman, Duane E.; 153, 158. 197 

Held, Ramona; 190, 86 

Heldreth, Ronda R.; 148 

Heldreth, Teresa A.; 162 

Helewa, Edward; 164 

Helewa, Grace M.; 164 

Hellmen, Elaine; 62 

Henderson, Jeffrey G.; 153 

Henderson, Paula J.; 190 

Hennen, Pamela E.; 144, 194 

Henry, Martha A.; 194 

Herndon, Darlene K.; 190 

Hernon, Scott A.; 163 

Herrick, Patricia; 148, 190 

Herring, Lewis; 125, 160 

Hess, Melva; 125 

Hess, Scott; 171 

Heston, Rose V.; 171, 173, 180 

Hibbs, Kenneth L.; 153 

Hibbs, Sharon; 150 

Hill, James P.; 166 

Hill, Larry; 103 

Hill, Michael J.; 149 

Hinerman, Janet E.; 100, 101 

Hines, Janet E.; 190 

Hinkle, William B.; 92, 93, 95 

Hitchcock, Beverly Y.; 158, 159, 164 

Hite, Joseph M.; 112, 156 

Hite, Teresa M.; 156 

Hoban, Ellen M.; 198 

Hockman, Karen L.; 190 

Hodge, Savannah; 17 

Hofbauer, John B.; 10, 12, 41, 166 

Holbert, Marlene K.; 172, 198 

Holbert, Rodney; 154 

Hoden, Creed; 31, 154 

Holden, Greg A.; 152 

Holder, Pricilla; 142 

Holloway, George J.; 136, 158 

Holt, Tammi J.; 194 

Holton, Ray L.; 31 

Home Economics Club; 163 

Homecoming; 24-29 

Hopkins, Donna J.; 52, 112, 101 

Home, Amy E.; 198 

Home, Nancy; 126 

Horner, Kimberly S.; 169, 180 

Horvath, Marie; 126 

Hosmeyer, Karen S.; 45 

Hott, Gregory W.; 100 

Houston, Sharon L.; 101 

Hoyer, Judith; 126 

HPERS; 130-131 

HPERS Club; 163 

Hudson, Marsha; 174 

Hughes, Vicki L.; 24, 90 

Humphries, Christopher; 31 

Hunt, Mari; 169, 171, 180 

Hunt, Robert A.; 165 

Hunter, Brenda L.; 165, 168, 170 

Hupp, Mary; 117 

Hussey, John; 11, 126 

Hutton, Gina 190 

Hyman, Mike R.; 165 



I Ice, Terry L.; 31, 198 
Ilacqua, Frank; 29, 91 
Insco, Ted; 190 



Insco 



Index/215 



I Never Sang 



"I Never Sang . . . ", 62, 63 
International Relations Club; 164 
Interfraternity Council; 146 
Interpanhellenic Council; 147 
Intervarsity; 164 
Isner, Kimberly S.; 198 



J JACK AND JILL CLEANERS; 206 
Jackson, Byron; 127 
Jackson, Christie; 163 
Jacques, Anita M.; 166 
Jamiel, Douglas; 31 
Jamison, Marjorie; 158, 159, 168 
Jarvis, Brent; 153 
Jarvis, Craig; 153 
Jarvis, Lisa; 166 
Jasper, David; 65, 169, 174, 180 
Jenkins, Mary E.; 198 
Jenkins, Robin D.; 198 
Johns, Rebecca; 145, 198 
Johnson, Katheryn; 190 
Johnson, Lowell; 
Johnson, Mark; 31 
Johnson, Stephen; 153 
Johnson, Susan K.; 39 
Johnson, Tina; 145 
JONES; 205 
Jones, Deborah; 181 
Jones, Donna L; 23, 101 
Jones, James; 159, 160, 191 
Jones, Manny; 65, 187 
Jones, Marcia D.; 198 
Jones, Randy R.; 31 

Jones, Steven C; 10, 13, 15, 20, 40, 41, 166, 168 
Jones, Terry A.; 171 
Jones, William A.; 75 
Jordan, Roger L.; 152, 167 
Joshi, Tulasi; 127 
Julian, William; 117, 146 
Juniors; 188-193 



KKanios, Melanie A.; 191 
Kappa Delta Pi; 165 
Karl, Ernest; 16 
Karlen, Lee A.; 181 
Kaufman, Pamela S.; 165, 181 
Kayser, Scott; 173, 181 
Keefover, Susan G.; 24 
Keeler, William; 168 
Keener, Deborah L.; 101 
Keener, Nyla C; 165, 170, 171 
Keefer, David M.; 154 
Kelby, Ruth; 175 
Kelley, Kenneth; 161 
Kelley, Michael C; 159, 165, 168 
Kemper, Kenneth R.; 154 
Kennedy, Brauna S.; 198 
Kennedy, Sharon L.; 191 
Kent, Kelly J.; 165, 172, 181 
Kerns, Frederick R.; 154 
Kerns, Paula J.; 191 
Kerns, Sharon A.; 150 
Kerr, William; 127 
Kerrigan, Vicki; 2 
Kessler, James D.; 158 
Kessler, Rebecca E.; 170 
KETTERING'S; 203 
Kime, Wayne; 128 
Kincell, Cheryl L.; 181 
Kiner, Rebecca A.; 120 
King, Marion L.; 172, 191 
Kirby, Mike; 83 
Kirby, Tamala S.; 181 
Kisner, Fleeta K.; 194 
Kisner, Kevin F.; 74, 75 
Kittle, Dale, 126, 171 
Kittle, Rhonda; 45 
Klein, Lanna; 198 
Kleman, Frank; 31 
Knepper, Melinda S.; 198 
Knight, Kimberly K.; 163 



Knight, Marta L.; 150, 194 

Knight, Tamela J.; 150 

Knotts, Donna J.; 78, 79, 191 

KLINGENSMITH MUSIC, INC.; 205 

Koay, Kenny H.; 181 

Koerner, John F.; 198 

Kopp, Thomas; 154 

Kraiza, Michael; 43 

Kroeger, Jerome H.; 154 

Kruger, Linda M.; 181 

Krzys, Carl; 154 

Kulju, Wayne M.; 153 

Kupperman, Esther; 17 

Kurdski, William D.; 31, 131 

Kupreanik, Richard; 128 

Kutz, Jo Ann; 181 



L'The Lady's . . . "; 80-81 
Lambert, Rod, P.; 153 
Lambert, Scotty B.; 160, 191 
Lamont, Melissa A.; 163 
Landfried, Elizabeth K.; 191 
Lang, Linda L.; 145, 194 
Langmaack, Carol A.; 191 
Language and Literature; 132-133 
Lantz, Tami; 191 
Lanyon, Cynthia R.; 194 
Laughlin, Lois; 2, 117 
Laughlin, William; 128 
Layman, Christina; 181 
Ledbetter, Datha D.; 159 
Lehosit, Emil F.; 79, 149 
Lehosit, Tom; 198 
Leishman, Brenda S.; 182 
Lemasters, Linda L.; 191 
Lemon, Bradford W.; 152 
Lenoir, Carl; 65, 143, 167 
Lester, Charla L.; 191 
Lester, Jeffery H.; 31 
LEVINE'S; 207 
Lewis, Kathy D.; 144 
Liebau, Marjorie; 191 
Lilly, Gregory; 154 
Linch, Arnetta M.; 166, 191 
Lindsay, Marcellis E.; 158 
Linger, Caryl; 166 
Linn, Leslie M.; 191 
Little, Carrol; 12, 21 
Liu, Rong-Lieh; 164 
Liu, Yuan; 129, 156 
Lively, Susan E.; 162 
Llaneza, Tom; 156 
Loar, Brenda K.; 182 
Lofstead, Becky; 117 
Loggins, Leroy; 65, 158 
Long, Kenneth E.; 31 
Lopez, Denise; 165 
Lopez, Michael G.; 126, 165, 171, 191 
Lord, Pierre A.; 31, 164 
Losh, Mark; 114, 182 
Lough, Denise R.; 162, 165, 191 
Lough, Jo Ann; 20, 166 
Lowdermilk, Diana L.; 198 
Lowe, Shelley; 148 
Loy, Arthur; 182 
Loy, Eugene P.; 31 
Loy, Fritz; 100, 101 
Loy, Leonard; 128 
Loy, Robert M.; 149, 168 
Lucas, Deborah L.; 159 
Lucente, Maria L.; 150, 198 
Ludwick, Sandra; 162 
Lusk, Jane; 198 
Luzapone, Helen; 170 
Lybrand, Jayne; 88 
Lynch, Gregory P.; 75, 182 
Lyons, Jo Ann; 182 



MMace, John R.; 152 
Mack, Annie R.; 101 
Maditz, Gary L.; 194 



216/Index 



Maditz, Larry L.; 194 

Mahaney, Steve; 43 

Mallamo; Cecelia; 15 

Mallamo, Joann S.; 5, 14 

Mallow, Duke; 149 

Malone; Dean S.; 154, 160 

Malone, Lisa M.; 182 

Maloney, Frances; 52 

Manano, Nancy; 163 

Mancina, Barbara J.; 73 

Manly, Charles; 117 

Manzo, David M.; 31 

Manzo, Melissa A.; 198 

Manzo, Tina M.; 182 

Marching Band; 165, 192 

Marlowe, Richard A.; 160 

Marlowe, Thomas E.; 142 

Marra, Jeffrey; 153 

Marsh, Diana L.; 182 

Marsh, Kimberly J.; 194 

Marsh, Melanie L.; 165, 170, 182 

Marsh, Susan B.; 194 

Marshall, Lenny; 32, 36, 31, 123 

Marshall, Scott E.; 159, 165, 168 

Martin, Charlene R.; 191 

Martin, James B.; 159 

Martin, Mary V.; 169, 183 

Martin, Tammy; 144 

Martyn, Brad; 100 

Marzano, Nancy; 148, 194 

Mason, Mary M.; 194 

Masquers; 40-41, 166 

Massullo, Robert C; 31, 172, 183 

Masters, Stanley; 158, 165, 171 

Masters, Susan L.; 198 

Maston, Mary L.; 183 

Mayhew, Elizabeth A.; 150 

Mayle, Elizabeth M.; 191 

Mazzie, Michael K.; 160 

McAfee, John K.; Ill 

McCarter, Robert; 17 

McCardle; Deborah K.; 183 

McCloskey, Thomas B.; 31 

McClung, Tonya A.; 145 

McClure, Connie M.; 198 

McConnell, Teresa C; 150, 163 

McCutcheon, Clyde; 167 

McDaniel, Ronda R.; 165, 172 

McDermott, Mary E.; 38, 113, 150, 198 

McDowell, Donna A.; 158, 159, 165, 170, 171 

McEldowney, Deborah; 39 

McGee, Tamala J.; 165, 191 

McGreevy, Kimi-Scott; 191 

Mclntire, Thomas E.; 183 

McKain, Carolyn E.; 145, 198 

McKee, Michelle C; 23, 101 

McKibben, Denise R.; 191 

McKinney, Wayne D.; 31 

McLaughlin, Earl; 129 

McVicker, Christy; 15 

McVicker, Nancy A.; 162 

Medical Laboratory Technology Association; 

166 
Medina, Katherine R.; 183 
Meikle, Adrienne D.; 39, 198 
Men's Intramural Staff; 167-168 
Meredith, A. Carla; 162 
Meredith, Kevin M.; 153 
Merrifield, Donna R.; 194 
Merritt, Karen; 157 
Messenger, Jay R.; 153, 168 
Michael, Carol A.; 82, 121, 183 
Michael, Michael M.; 31 
Michels, Tamela J.; 174 
Mick, Cora S.; 23, 183 
Mick, Crystal L.; 145, 147, 194 
MIDDLETOWN NATIONAL BANK; 206 
Mihaliak, Monica H.; 194 
Miller, Constance J.; 183 
Miller, David R.; 198 
Miller, Forrest C; 183 
Miller, Karl K.; 191 
Miller, Martha; 129 
Miller, Vaughn; 183 
Mills, Kathy K.; 198 
Minarcin, Joseph; 31 



Miss FSC; 86-87 

Mitchell, Allen; 191 

Mitchell, Catherine A.; 39 

Mitchell, Genevieve R.; 183 

Mitchell, Susan B.; 147, 148 

Moats, James T.; 31 

Moats, Pamela S.; 183 

Moats, Ronald M.; 31 

Modzik, Andrew E.; 31 

Moerk, Alice; 158, 170 

Moffett, Robert; 143 

Monteleone, Donna J.; 183 

Montgomery, Blair; 117 

Moody, Frances; 129, 168 

Moore, Al; 154 

Moore, Jerrey T.; 191 

Moore, Kathy J.; 45 

Moran, Judith A.; 191 

Moran, Roger D.; 31 

Moreland, Sara A.; 191 

Morgan, Andrew R.; 31 

Morgan, Anne; 130 

Morgan, Daniel L.; 157 

Morgan, David A.; 31 

Morgan, Edward A.; 183 

Morgan, Janice; 157 

Morgan, Roger D.; 157, 191 

Moroose, Donald; 130 

Morrell, Sylvia J.; 60, 61, 148 

Morris, Debra L.; 198 

Morris, Jeffrey S.; 149, 93 

Morris, Matt; 31, 36 

Morris, Michele L.; 79, 191 

Morris, Phillip L.; 74, 183 

Morris, Richard B.; 43, 154 

Morris, Vicki L.; 172, 194 

Morrison, Deborah; 130 

Morton, Ed; 153 

Morton, Michael; 154 

Morton, Scott C; 42 

Mosby, James; 31, 32 

MOSEBACH ELECTRIC AND SUPPLY; 207 

Moss, Patricia D.; 150, 157, 164, 175, 194 

Mraovich, Kathleen; 148 

Mullenax, Patricia A.; 183 

Mullenix, Pamela A.; 198 

Mullennex, Dana; 162, 183 

Mullins, Gerald A.; 154 

Mullins, Linda A.; 191 

Mulneix, Kimberly A.; 110 

Murchland, Shari A.; 192 

Murgo, Bruce A.; 31 

Murphy, Kathy L.: 174, 199 

Music Educators' National Conference; 168 

Myak, Robert D.; 31 

Myers, David L.; 169 

Myers, Karen S.; 148 

Myers, Nancy N.; 183 

Myers, Sally L.; 184 

Myers, Timothy E.; 31 



NNarducci, Kenneth D.; 93, 94 
Naum, Byron; 131 
Naumann, Leslie; 159, 199 
Neely, Jodi M.; 156 
Nemith, James; 154 
Neptune, Marlyn; 38 
Nesselroad, Joanna; 131 
Newbrough, Kathern F.; 199 
Newcome, Mildred; 131 
Newsom, Roger E.; 31 
Nicholas, Frank; 153 
Nolf, Marsha; 117 
Norris, Michael L.; 149, 184 
Nunnally, Thomas; 131 
Nutter, Barbara; 45, 132 



OOakes, Anglea K.; 157, 199 
O'Brien, Paul E.; 166 
O'Dell, Cathy; 20, 21, 40, 145, 166 
Offutt, Glafre; 158 



Offutt 



Index/217 



Oliverio 



Oliverio, Barbara J.; 144, 155, 159, 165, 171, 

173, 184 
Oliverio, Nannette; 192 
Oliveto, Danny; 65 
Oliveto, James N.; 157 
Ollis, Karen L.; 126, 156 
Ollis, Linda A.; 158, 159, 168, 170 
O'Neal, Edward B.; 65 
Orchard, John M.; 154 
Oreskovich, Mark; 20 
Organizations; 144-175 
Orteza, Luis A.; 184 
Orville, Naegele; 130 
Ossman, Lori A.; 150 
Overking, John; 160 
Overking, Michael; 132 
OWENS-ILLINOIS; 209 



P Painter, Lisa G.; 150, 165, 172, 184 
Pallotta, Jay J.; 152 

Palmer, Kimberly J,; 192 

Pancake, John S.; 184 

PABST BLUE RIBBON BEER; 202 

Parker, Toni D.; 158, 172 

Parks, Cynthia D.; 158 

Parks, John; 132 

Parks, Timothy; 160 

Parrish, Dawn D.; 166, 192 

Pasqual, Richard J.; 152 

Pasquale, John; 184 

Patterson, Jacqueline D.; 145 

Patterson, Janis; 184 

Paugh, Elva; 

Paugh, George; 

Pearse, Ronald; 132 

Peiffley, Robert A.; 93, 94 

Pellillo, Albert J.; 184 

Perrine, Deborah J.; 145, 199 

Perrine, Sheila; 194 

Perry, Buddy L.; 31 

Perry, Elston E.; 22, 23, 222 

Perry, Fran; 83 

Peters, H. Dean; 117 

Petro, Flora; 133 

Phares, Daniel; 133 

Phi Gamma Mu; 169 

Pheasant, John; 133, 161 

Phillips, Craig W.; 164 

Phillips, J. Carl; 192 

Phillips, Jeanne; 5, 14 

Phillips, Jeffrey S.; 161 

Phillips, Robert W.; 154 

Phillips, Scott; 153 

Phillips, Stephany D.; 145 

Phillips, Walter; 133 

Phillips, William; 134 

Phi Mu; 148 

Pi Alpha Theta; 169 

Pinn, Douglas J.; 152 

PITROLO PONTIAC CADILLAC CO.; 208 

Placha, John P.; 165, 168 

Plachta, Carolyn J.; 24, 173, 175 

Poling, Alan; 134 

Poling, Deborah K.; 159 

Poling, Nancy J.; 195 

Political Science Association; 170 

Pope, Angeli C; 192 

Pope, Gail; 134 

Post, Renee C; 45 

Post, Richard A.; 165 

Potter, Corey J.; 184 

Potter, William; 134 

Powell, Beverly E.; 192 

Powell, Ruth; 117 

Pratt, Crystal A.; 140 

Price, Clifton D.; 169 

Price, Natalie L.; 150 

Prickett, Kimberly; 192 

Prickett, Timothy J.; 153, 192, 100 

Pride, Dennis; 159, 160 

Priester, Harry; 135 

Pritchett, William; 134, 135, 137 

Pritt, Debbie R.; 199 

Proudfoot, David; 184 



Prozzillo, Dee Ann; 150 
Pulice, Frank; 117, 153 



Q Queen, Joseph E.; Ill 
Queen, Mark S.; 146, 152 
Quinn, Mary Beth; 174, 192 



RRadcliff, Judith; 135 
Radcliff, Tonya K.; 166, 192 
Radcliffe, Donna P.; 136 
Radcliffe Kevin; 31 
Rader, Randall C; 154 
Rahvar, Siavash; 164 
Raikes, Genevieve; 52, 53, 185 
Raines, Dan L.; 199 
Ramono, Jim; 154 
Ravn, Timothy P.; 31 
Rebrook, Scott E.; 192 
Redcliffe, Mark; 185 
Reed, Danielle; 145 
Reed, Don L.; 12, 21, 41, 166, 199 
Reed, Julie; 192 
Reed, Sharon; 44, 45 
Refosco, Mark; 165, 171, 199 
Reinhart, Robert; 170 
Retton, Joe; 7, 64, 65 
Retton, John; 11, 20, 26, 62, 63, 110, 129, 166, 

168 
Rexrode, Tama; 185 
Rhoades, Renee; 159 
Rice, Tina; 185 
Ricer, David L.; 153 
Rich, David; 153 
Richards, Francis C; 185 
Richards, Thomas W.; 31 
Richardson, Raymond; 135 
Riddle, Harley; 100 
Riggleman, Karen; 39 
Riggs, Elizabeth A.; 199 
Righter, Allison Y.; 150 
Riley, Damon; 13, 166 
Riley, Joseph E.; 2, 8, 65, 68, 69 
Riley, Lonnie L.; 31, 199 
Riley, Mary A.; 10, 20, 128 
Riley, Vicki L.; 199 
Rinehart, Stephen; 31 
Riser, Penny; 165 
Ritchie, David; 136 
Robinson, Emily; 165, 172, 185 
Robinson, Susan A.; 195 
Robinson, Virginia K.; 185 
Robinson, Mark A.; 172, 91 
Rock-a-thon; 74-75 
Rokisky, Tim; 154 
Romaine, Marianne; 45 
Romano, Lisa M.; 52, 53 
Romine, Mary; 195 
Ropp, Linda S.; 174 
Roscoe, Craig; 160 
Rose, Kimberly; 192 
Rose, Paul J.; 112 
Rosena Gina M.; 195 
Rosser, William D.; 31 
Rossi, Paula D.; 165, 185 
Rowand, Melanie; 192 
Ruggiero, Gina M.; 12, 24, 27, 41, 163, 166 
Rumer, Barbara J.; 156 
Runion, Clarence F.; 11, 159, 165, 173, 199 
Runner, John M.; 156, 185 
Ruoff, William; 136 
Russell, Laura L.; 185 
Ryan, Patricia; 136, 164, 170 



SSadala, Gordon W.; 164, 195 
Sanders, Harry; 22 
Santeufemia, Virginia; 173, 192 
Santy, Harold; 161 
Sapp, Gerald; 65 
Satterfield, Tracy; 14 
Sauro, Michael; 82 
Savage, Charlie; 43 



218/Index 



Savedge, Colonel Chuck; 133 

Saville, Mary M.; 175 

SAY-BOY STEAK HOUSE RESTAURANT; 

205 
Sayre, Stephanie; 192 
Schalmo, Ken; 60, 153 
Schaupp, Frederick; 146 
Schilling, Terri; 150 
Schmidle, Sally A.; 148 
Schooley, John; 137 
Schwanenberger, Brian D.; 31 
Sciegaj, Matthew; 156 
Sciences, The; 134-137 
Sciuga, Kathleen; 147, 155, 174 
Scott, Carol; 137 
Scott, James M.; 172, 188, 86 
Scott, Janet L.; 199 
Sears, Vicki; 
Seccuro, Daniel R.; 153 
Seckman, Rebecca A.; 165, 172 
Seese, Carmila L.; 199 
SELECT PASTRIES; 208 
Selvey, Peggy; 192 
Seniors; 176-187 
Setliff, Mary D.; 199 
Seventies, The; 48-51 
Shaffer, Ladonna; 199 
Shaffer, William; 117 
Shafferman, Kathryn; 159 
Shafferman, Susan; 165 
Shan, Robert; 137 
Shears, Vicky; 38, 162, 163, 175 
Sheets, Teresa; 162 
Shelhammer, George S.; 170 
Sheppard, Stephen; 153 
Sherman, B.J.; 63, 137, 166 
Sherves, Rustie; 75 
Shidler, Larry K.; 192 
Shields, Cynthia M.; 150 
Shillingburg, Pamela Y,; 173, 191 
Shillingburg, Randy D.; 133, 173, 185, 192 
Shirkey, Brenda K.; 170, 171, 185 
Shriver, Rodney L.; 156 
Shuman, William K.; 165 
Sigma Alpha Iota; 170 
Sigma Pi; 149 
Sigma Sigma Sigma; 150 
Sigma Tau Delta; 171 
Sigma Tau Gamma; 151 
Signorelli, David B.; 160 
Simonof, Jean; 117 
Simpson, Tracy D.; 192 
Sindledecker, Sharene; 14, 15 
Singley, Barbara; 45, 185 
Sinsel, Sandra L.; 185 
Sisler, Kathy Y.; 173, 185 
Sister Sledge; 84-85 
Six, Brad; 12 
Skeens, Jeffrey A.; 153 
Skidmore, Charley B.; 154 
Skinner, Patricia; 148 
Slack, Jack D.; 31, 33 
Smith, Billie L.; 192 
Smith, Darren; 156 
Smith, Denise A.; 158 
Smith, Dwayne C; 31 
Smith, Jamie C; 185 
Smith, Jennifer; 164, 185 
Smith, Kathy S.; 74, 159 
Smith, Kelcie S.; 2, 60, 61, 140, 144, 195 
Smith, Mark; 166 
Smith, Tamalah M.; 150 
Snodgrass, Cheryl R.; 145, 185 
Snodgrass, John B.; 22, 100 
Snyder, Barbara; 142 
Snyder, Suzanne; 160 
Snyder, William; 152 
Social Sciences; 138-139 
Social Work Club; 174 
Society for Collegiate Journalists; 171 
Sofdan, Roger; 168 
Soles, Deborah L.; 192 
Sophomores; 194-195 
Souch, Michael; 127 
Spaid, Richard; 154, 192 
Spencer, Lisa F.; 192 
Spencer, Melanie; 158, 195 



Sponaugle, Judy; 192 

Spradling, Denise M.; 73, 144, 155, 159, 165, 

185 
Spradling, Kelly; 199 
Sprigg, Sharon L.; 192 
Sprouse, Danny; 31 
Sprouse, Mary P.; 192 
Staffileno, Frederick R.; 153 
Stage Band; 171 
Stankwich, Pat; 10, 11 
Stansberry, William; 31 
Statler, Allen; 153 
Statler, Samuel; 153 
Steed, Doris D.; 192 
Stemple, Peggy L.; 173, 186 
Stemple, Robert; 117 
Stephens, Joyce A.; 195 
Sterling, Terri L.; 61, 148 
Stevens, Kathy W.; 192 
Stevick, Thomas R.; 12, 166 
Stewart, Anne E.; 166 
Stewart, Elizabeth A.; 171, 173, 193 
Stewart, Jamie; 159, 168, 170 
Stickler, Judy; 150, 195 
Stier, Stephen H.; 31 

Stiles, Floyd P.; 28, 32, 68, 79, 153, 163, 186 
Stingo, Kendra; 166 
Stolipher, Mary E.; 193 
Stone, Michael A.; 65 
Stout, H. Allen; 31 
Stout, Joyce A.; 186 
St. Pierre, Gregory; 100 
Straight, Belinda K.; 186 
Straight, Robin K.; 174 
Student Center Renovations; 58-59 
Student Education Association; 172 
Student Government; 88-91, 172 
Student Night Life; 82-83 
Student Nurses; 173 
Student Publications; 173 
Stull, Sandy A.; 163 
Stump, Jolinda L.; 199 
Sturm, Rhonda; 171, 173, 186 
Su, Simon; 164 
Suan, William; 149 
Seccurro, Joyce M.; 195 
Summer Theater; 10-15 
Summers, Kimberly J.; 150 
Summers, Rochelle; 87 
Suter, Derrik; 193 
Sweeney, Christiane; 133 
Sweetheart Ball; 60-61 
Swiger, Elizabeth; 156 
Swiger, Kimberly; 193 
Swimming; 54-57 
Swisher, Donna M.; 193 
Swisher, Sandra; 193 



TTabibian, Masood; 164 
Talerico, Anna S.; 78, 79 
Tangyunyong, Paiboon; 137, 164 
Tarley, Sally; 123 
Tarr, Tammi L.; 148 
Tau Beta Iota; 152 
Tau Kappa Espilon; 153 
Tavares, Donald R.; 31 
Tawney, Frederick J.; 149 
Taylor, Barry L.; 167 
Taylor, Christine A.; 166, 193 
Taylor, Denise A.; 145, 172, 186 
Taylor, Frances L.; 157, 186 
Taylor, Linda J.; 193 
Taylor, Marsha D.; 195 
Taylor, Melinda S.; 148 
Taylor, Teresa S.; 193 
Teahan, Mimi; 5, 14 
Teahan, John; 14 
Teahan, Julie; 15 
Technology; 140-143 
Tennant, Judy K.; 59, 193 
Tennent, Tammy; 78, 79 
Terry, Susan M.; 186 
Terry, William E.; 158, 165, 171 
Tetrick, Barbara; 143 
Thayer, William C; 154 



Thayer 



Index/219 



Theta 



Theta Xi; 154 

Thomas, Rhonda L.; 166 

Thompson, Raymond; 31 

Thompson, Mark A.; 186 

Thompson, Mark R.; 153, 195 

Thompson, Michael D.; 199 

Thompson, Rebecca; 5, 14 

Thompson, Tracy H.; 199 

Thompson, William; 161 

Thorn, Kimberly A.; 181 

Thorpe, John A.; 43 

Tiano, Lisa F.; 186 

Tinnell, Gregory; 88, 156, 172 

Tinnell, Robert J.; 12, 153, 156, 193 

Togans, Keith V.; 140 

Tokarz, Mary A.; 186 

Toothman, Caroline; 52, 159 

Toothman, Daniel; 165, 171 

Toothman, Lisa A.; 173 

Toothman, Rosina C; 23, 101 

Tousignant, Luc; 31, 36, 164 

Track; 100-101 

Trickett, Robert W,; 149 

Triplett, Steven D.; 160, 193 

Troy, Donna L.; 148, 193 

Tucker, Eric; 5, 14 

Tucker, Robert L.; 153 

Turner, Andrew C; 31 

Turner, Oden M.; 65 

Turney, Debra; 193 

Tuttle^ Pamela M.; 170, 174, 186 



U Underwood, Timmy T.; 31 
Urda, Kristine L.; 199 
Utt, Vicky S.; 72, 186 



V Valentine, Douglas R.; 31 
Vandevender, Dixie L.; 150 
VanGilder, Dennis N.; 149 
VanGilder, Stephen L.; 149, 100 
VanHorn Joanne; 140, 169 
Veasey, Marilee; 140 
Viands, Pamela; 186 
Vickers, Stacy M.; 86, 87 
Vilar, Rochelle; 12, 166 
Viola, Mark A.; 31, 32, 35 
Viox, Timothy C; 31 
Volleyball; 38-39 
Vroselen, Janet L.; 199 
V&W ELECTRIC AND SUPPLY; 206 



WWade, William; 31 
Wagner, Lance B.; 186 
Walker, Betty; 165, 168 
Walker, David P.; 199 
Walker, Jennifer L.; 150 
Walker, Joyce A.; 170, 195 
Walker, Judy L.; 186 
Walker, Kathryn L.; 52 
Walker, Thomas W.; 146, 147, 149, 193 
Walters, Charles; 157, 159, 164, 172 
Wamsley, Eugenia; 186 
Wang, Yu San; 140 
Warco, Kevin A.; 3, 149 
Ward, Cheryl J.; 186 
Ward, Timothy; 31, 101 
Wardian, Richard; 140, 169 
Warner, June E.; 186 
Warren, Steve; 10, 13, 201 
Washburn, David B.; 149 
Waslo, Mark D.; 24, 31, 34, 82 
Waslosky, Nadine M.; 150, 173, 199 
Water Polo; 42-43 
Watkins, Debra D.; 186 
Watsell, Charlotte; 150 
Watson, Christina D.; 187 
Watson, Mark J.; 153 
Watt, Wilham H.; 31 
Weaver, Deborah L.; 199 
Weaver, Gary L.; 162 
Weaver, Roger L.; 146, 154, 167 
Weaver, Scott P.; 199 



Weaver, Sharon; 193 

Weber, Daniel; 140 

Wedge, Dorothy; 141 

Weekley, Timothy W.; 193 

Weekley, William J.; 22, 193, 100 

Welch, Patricia A.; 5, 15, 29 

Wells, Diana K.; 199 

Wells, John A.; 149 

Wells, Karen D.; 187 

Wesley Foundation; 174 

West, Belinda K.; 170 

Westfall, Vera L.; 193 

Whetsel, Kyle G.; 195 

White, Jennifer L.; 72 

White, Jo Lynn; 150, 155, 187 

Whitehair, Susan E.; 193 

Whiteman, Robert; 141 

Whiting, Ronald; 103, 168 

Whitlock, Charles; 159 

Wigal, Lora; 162, 163 

Wightman, Allyson G.; 148 

Willard, Margaret; 141, 162, 164, 165, 170, 172 

Williams, David C; 31 

Williams, Erin G.; 156, 162 

Williams, Jean A.; 24, 145, 174. 195 

Williams, Kristi A.; 78, 79, 163, 193 

Williams, Lisa D.; 145 

Williams, Michael A.; 22, 100, 149, 195 

Williams, Patricia R.; 187 

Williams, Randy; 152 

Williams, Steven S.; 199 

Williams, Suzanne; 173, 187 

Williams, William; 141 

Willis, Eric N.; 173 

Wills, Barry L.; 195 

Wills, Deborah; 144 

Wilmoth, Mary J.; 74, 195 

Wilson, Cliff E.; 153 

Wilson, Kim E.; 145 

Wilson, Michael N.; 149 

Wilson, Randy J.; 12, 21 

Wilson, Skipp; 158, 159, 168 

Wilson, Toni L.; 187 

Wirth, Joseph P.; 31 

Wise, James M.; 31, 33 

Wiseman, Charlene A.; 150 

Wiseman, Nancy D.; 60, 150 

Wolfe, Crystal L.; 144, 147, 187 

Wolford, Brenda A.; 162 

Women's Basketball; 52-53 

Women's Intramural Staff; 175 

Women's Panhellenic Council; 155 

Women's Tennis; 44-45 

Wood, Jill; 193 

Wood, Kevin D.; 160 

Wood 'n Math; 72-73 

Woody, Robin L.; 145, 174, 195 

Workman, Kathryn L.; 199 

Worstell, Carleen L.; 165, 172, 187 

Wrestling; 92-95 

Wright, Barbara M.; 148 

Wright, Clifford, 31 

Wright, James F.; 65 

Wright, Joyce E.; 199 

Wright, Martha S.; 193 

Wright, Shellie A.; 101 

Wright, Vinton D.; 165, 171 

Wu, Andy Hsni Lok; 199 

Wugate, Charles K.; 154, 199 

Wyckoff, Debra L.; 164, 187 

Wyckoff, Jean A.; 166 



YYeager, Nancy L.; 187 
Yelcich, Ramona J.; 199 
Yost, LeAnn; 159, 173, 199 
Yost, Lynette; 156 
Yost, Sheila R.; 193 
Young, James; 141 
Young, John C; 153 



ZZabaneh, Muna; 164 
Zacot, William E.; 167, 168 
Zirbs, Rebecca S.; 52 



220/ Index 



Contributors 



Emma Annan 
Lary Arnett 
Cheryl Can- 
Michael Crawley 
Susi Cross 
Becky Cupp 
Micki Eden 
Cathy Eyler 
Lee Ann Karlen 
Scott Kayser 
Bob Heffner 



J-240 Students 
Lynne Laswell 
Kimi-Scott McGreevy 
Genny Raikes 
Don Reed 
Pam Shillingburg 
Randy Shillingburg 
Stacy Vickers 
Toni Wilson 
LeAnn Yost 
Sheila Yost 



Photographic Contributors 



Dan Barker 
Cheryl Carr 
Linda Elmer 
Lee Ann Karlen 
Doug Kyle 
Mark Losh 
Cathy Mitchell 
Mike Norris 
Barbara Oliverio 



Mike Sauro 
Pam Shillingburg 
Randy Shillingburg 
Jim Short 
Kelcie Smith 
Dr. Steve Stephenson 
Stevens Studios 
Barb Tetrick 
Mark Thompson 



Staff 



Advertising 
Mary Ann Gorrell 
Cheryl Carr 
Susi Cross 

Co-editors 



Editorial Assistants 
Cathy Figler 
Denise Gower 
Mike Edmond 

Barbara Oliverio 
Linda Elmer 



The 1980 Mound was 
printed on 80 lb. bordeaux 
paper. Smyth sewn, the 
book was rounded and 
backed and consists of 224 
pages. Herff Jones printed 
the book and class pictures 
were taken by Stevens Stu- 
dios. Melior type was used 
with 18, 30, 36 pt. for head- 
lines, 10 pt. for body copy 
and 8 pt. for captions. 

The cover and division 
pages design was a Metaco- 
lor process by Metacolor of 
San Francisco, California. 
The design was created by 
Linda Elmer with the final 
art work prepared by Lary 



— Colophon 



Arnett. 

The yearbook would be 
at a loss without the many 
contributors and photog- 
raphers who helped make 
the book a living, exciting 
project. Three staffers de- 
serving special recognition 
were Cathy, Denise and 
Mike who were there from 
start to finish. 

Much appreciation goes 
to Bob Heffner, Barb Tet- 
rick, LuAnne Boyce, Debbie 
Moore and especially Jane 
Dumire for their donations 
of expertise and encour- 
agement. 



Fairmont State College is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action institution. 



Colophon/221 




FALCON GRIDDERS show signs of 
fatigue during a clash with 
Concord. 



ELSTON PERRY takes time to rest 
in between events. 



Sure, there were times 
when we thought we could 
not last a day longer, let 
alone four years. Yet we 
had taste. 

—The bitter taste of fail- 
ure whether on the field or 
in the classroom— 



—the sweetness of gradu- 
ation, finding a new friend 
or the unexpected pleasure 
of passing a test— 

—the sour aftertaste of a 
hard night of studying or . . . 
whatever— 




JAMES BROOKS, art professor, 
sketches Morgan Turnbull during 
"Experience 79," an open house, 
sponsored by the Division of Fine 
Arts. 



mmm 

A CONTESTANT throws a frisbee 
during the Special Olympics held 
in the Feaster Center. 



222/Closing 




. . , ... . 




Dr. William A. Boram 



Dr. William Alden Boram 
died Nov. 15, 1979, at his 
home at 1136 Bell Run Rd. 
following an extended ill- 
ness. He was born Nov. 14, 
1931, in Weston. 

The 48-year-old vice pres- 
ident of academic affairs 
was selected for the office 
in 1970. He had previously 
served as chairman of the 
Division of Language and 
Literature. During the 
1960's, he held a position at 
Ohio University, but later 
returned in 1970 to begin 
his decade of office. 

"Dr. Boram was the 
school's chief academic 



officer during a period of 
significant growth, and the 
success of many of our new 
two and four year programs 
stemmed largely from his 
leadership," stated Dr. H. 
Dean Peters, Boram's suc- 
cessor as FSC's vice presi- 
dent of academic affairs. 
"He was highly regarded 
throughout the state as an 
academic leader." 

Boram was a graduate of 
Glenville State College with 
a B.A. degree in education. 
He held an M.A. degree 
from West Virginia Univer- 
sity and a Ph.D. from the 
University of Pittsburgh. 



He was an active member 
of the Fairmont City Coun- 
cil, the Fairmont General 
Hospital Board, the Ameri- 
can Association, of Univer- 
sity Administrators, the 
West Virginia Deans' Asso- 
ciation, the Fairmont Rotary 
Club, and the First Presby- 
terian Church. 

"He was very effective in 
working with the faculty 
and in the implementation 
of academic programs," said 
Dr. Wendell Hardway, pres- 
ident. 

Dr. Boram is survived by 
his widow Joann and three 
children. 



Closing/223 



LARY ARNETT hits the dance floor 
at a local night spot. 

Savoring 
flavor 



All in all, after we have 
left the hill for the last time, 
the thoughts will be savored 
and the flavor will linger for 
a lifetime. 



MARGARET GRASTY signals for a 
touchdown during "Monday Night 
Football." 




224/Closing 



9 



FAIRM0N1 



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